Woman Photographs Her Street Harassers

dollbabi

Earth Angel
Hannah Price’s series, City of Brother Love, features portraits of men in Philadelphia captured just moments after they harassed her on the street.

My Harassers - The Morning News

Photographer Takes Portraits Of Men Moments After They Catcall Her; The Results Are Mesmerizing | Clutch Magazine

Hannah Price Photography













Raised in Fort Collins, Colo., Hannah Price is a photographic artist primarily interested in American minorities. As a mixed-race minority herself, Ms. Price seeks out subjects that she is often stereotypically linked to.

Price is a 2009 graduate of Rochester Institute of Technology. She has exhibited work at NEXT at the Philadelphia Photo Art Center, receiving the 2nd prize awarded by Ariel Shanberg of the Center for Photography at Woodstock; the In Review exhibition at Gallery 339 in Philadelphia; the (Por)trait Revealed exhibition at Rayko Gallery in San Francisco; and the Here and Now: Prints, Drawings and Photographs by Ten Philadelphia Artists exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Three of Ms. Price’s photographs from the City of Brotherly Love series are included in the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Her most recent exhibtion Emerging Photographers Hannah Price & Glynnis Reed: City of Brotherly Love and Elements of Love was at Stockton Art Gallery, in Galloway, NJ.

She attends the Yale School of Art, working on receiving her MFA in Fine Art Photography in 2014.


The Morning News:
How did the series begin?

Hannah Price:
I grew up in Fort Collins, Colo., and never experienced men publicly expressing their sexual interest in me till I moved to Philadelphia. At the time it was an unusual experience and threw me off guard.

TMN:
Describe the moment when you turn your camera on the guy.

HP:
Once a guy catcalls me, depending on the situation, I would either candidly take their photograph or walk up to them and ask if I can take their photograph. They usually agree and we talk about our lives as I make their portrait.

TMN:
You do a lot of portrait work. How much of yourself is in each shot?

HP:
I always make sure the lighting and composition is as beautiful as possible and try and capture what is interesting about the person.

TMN:
Editing a series like this, do you detach yourself?

HP:
No.

TMN:
What’s your favorite camera at the moment?

HP:
Mamiya 7 and Panasonic AVCHD 40 video camera.

TMN:
What do you think of shooting with your cell phone?

HP:
Camera phones take great pictures! I personally won’t use them for professional use, but don’t mind if others do!

TMN:
When was the last time you were made uncomfortable by someone else’s artwork?

HP:
A Clifford Owens performance last year.

TMN:
Can you elaborate on that?

HP:
I’d prefer not to.
 

femmeayitienne

***//\\***
I wonder what the discussion was like when she asked to take their photo. I also am curious about what was going through their minds.
 

agroDOLCE

SweetfuhDayz
Interesting project. The second and third photos are most interesting to me. Look at the guy's eyes in the second photo.

I wonder what was so uncomfortable about the Clifford Owens performance.
 

iPicong

New member
Why the heifer couldn't say "courted" instead of harassed...........poor black men being further demonized and stigmatized by their oppressors just for showing interest in the "mixed race minority" woman
 

BacchanalDiva

Registered User
Waiting for someone to point out that this chick is not hood and yet subjected to same behavior from the men of the hood. Wonder if they saw this, what the chances are that it will hit home to them that their behavior is not normal?
 

Poca

Registered User
Well she probably exhibited one of the mentioned behaviors and her mama didn't properly prepare her either.

When women are Objectified it is more deliberate than random. Men Objectified women that exhibit a provocative nature/demeanor/appearance, that appear to be clueless or less likely to verbally defend themselves. So, this falls back on the female's parents, especially the mother....she is a female and should know the dangers that presented to women, and how to protect her daughter from them.
 

BacchanalDiva

Registered User
Well she probably exhibited one of the mentioned behaviors and her mama didn't properly prepare her either.

When women are Objectified it is more deliberate than random. Men Objectified women that exhibit a provocative nature/demeanor/appearance, that appear to be clueless or less likely to verbally defend themselves. So, this falls back on the female's parents, especially the mother....she is a female and should know the dangers that presented to women, and how to protect her daughter from them.
:kicks
 

femmeayitienne

***//\\***
Well she probably exhibited one of the mentioned behaviors and her mama didn't properly prepare her either.

When women are Objectified it is more deliberate than random. Men Objectified women that exhibit a provocative nature/demeanor/appearance, that appear to be clueless or less likely to verbally defend themselves. So, this falls back on the female's parents, especially the mother....she is a female and should know the dangers that presented to women, and how to protect her daughter from them.
Lolololol
 

iPicong

New member
Wow. Wonder if he went through with it...but how can you actually do that to an audience member? He doesn't think they'll press charges? I'm :confused:
if u home click on google images of his name........sick puppy or artistic genius depending on who u talk to
 

BacchanalDiva

Registered User
if u home click on google images of his name........sick puppy or artistic genius depending on who u talk to
Crazy. But thanks I get it now. They already knew what to expect and that art makes sense to me now.

On a theoretical level, part of me expected to feel both turned on and at least mildly terrified. The score seemed to bear directly on Walker’s own work, where silhouettes of compromising master-slave relationships illustrate the underbelly of power dynamics within imagined sexual tableaux. A video and photographs of Owens’s previous performances of Walker’s score line one wall of the PS1 exhibition. Before participating in the performance, we as audience members had the chance to see how others had reacted and “performed”during the score’s previous iterations. So by staying, by agreeing to participate in a scenario that we’d already been given glimpses of, we as audience members were also complicit in the performance’s unfolding.

Yet on a personal level, for me Owens’s actions spoke to more than merely a demonstration of a concept. As he perused the audience members, I felt myself caught in the throes of desire and shame. I had to ask myself what I would permit if he were to approach me, only to be grateful when he moved on. I wanted to believe that something was being worked out in this space, that we were all participating in some kind of exorcism by recapitulating the shared trauma of slavery and prejudice. It’s about a Black man being allowed to exercise a power in the museum that he could be arrested for if enacted in the public realm. When I later asked Owens about his performance of Walker’s score, he immediately referred to the threatening history between white women and black men, and his desire to challenge it. He talked about the challenge of dealing with rejection from the people he solicits, and how each time he has performed Walker’s score, he has an experience of himself inside of his male identity that is hard to reconcile in the real world.

I spoke to the women Owens approached after the performance and was surprised by their ambiguous relationships to his coercion. Each woman drew boundaries around what kind of intimacy was permissible and what wasn’t based on her own mysterious gauge. One told me she felt fine being touched, but did not want to kiss him, another said she felt fine making out, but then when he started to feel her up she was worried that her boyfriend would feel uncomfortable. A third said she enjoyed the spontaneity of dry humping, but didn’t want him in her pants. Among them all, there was a sense of permissiveness, of being willing to serve the work that Owens was creating, and of wanting it to be successful, that to me seemed sacrificial and eerie.
 
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