Suspected Serial Killer in custody

Mrs. Campbell

Girl Crush
Indiana man held after bodies of seven women found - CNN.com

(CNN) -- It started with one body at a motel in Hammond, Indiana.
By the next day, a 43-year-old Gary man was in custody, and his confession, police say, would lead them to three other women's bodies. They'd find three more the next day.
The bodies were found in four locations, and the man "continues to provide information of possible locations, not just in Gary but in other parts of northwest Indiana," Gary Mayor Karen Freeman-Wilson told CNN.
"It's quite possible that there may be more victims," the mayor said.
Bodies of 7 women found in Indiana Man held after bodies of 7 women found
Though the man hasn't been charged or identified, local headlines blare and residents wonder: Did police find a serial killer?
Authorities have yet to label the man as such.
Police were told Friday night that an unresponsive woman was found in a room at a Motel 6 off Interstate 80, Lt. Richard Hoyda of the Hammond Police Department said. The 19-year-old woman had been killed by strangulation, CNN affiliate WGN reported.
Detectives developed a lead that led them Saturday to Gary, where they executed search warrants on a home and vehicle and took a person of interest into custody, Hoyda told CNN.
"The search warrant was executed not at the residence of the suspect but at a location near to the reported suspect's home in Gary," he said in a statement.
The man made a confession and took detectives to Gary, where "several other female victims of possible homicide" were found, Hoyda said. Three women were found in three abandoned homes Saturday, and police found three other bodies Sunday, Freeman-Wilson said.
Two victims identified
Two of the seven bodies recovered have been identified, said Chelsea Whittington, a spokeswoman for Freeman-Wilson.
Afrikka Hardy, 19, was the first woman found, on Friday, according to authorities.
Anith Jones, 35, of Merrillville, was one of the victims, a mayor\'s spokeswoman says.
Afrikka Hardy, 19, was the woman found at the Motel 6, and Anith Jones, 35 of Merrillville, who had been missing since October 8, was found over the weekend, she said.
The five other women have yet to be identified, Whittington said. Freeman-Wilson said she was not aware of any connection among the women but noted that only two had been identified.
A man living next door to where one of the bodies was found told CNN affiliate WSBT that he believes the crimes occurred recently.
"Somebody had to come in there like last week or something, because (Northern Indiana Public Service Company) and the water company were there turning off the power and stuff, so there was no one in there," Justin Jones said.
Suspect 'certainly was cooperative'
The man in custody, who is talking to police, is a convicted sex offender from Austin, Texas, Freeman-Wilson said. He also had a conviction out of Lake County, Indiana, that was "not in the sex offender category," she said.
"He certainly was cooperative. He led (police) to the locations of these bodies. Whether he was eager or not, I'm not in a position to say that," she said.
Several police agencies are now working the case, which could grow larger and expand into at least one other state, the mayor said.
In total, seven women were found -- one at the Motel 6 and six at undisclosed locations, the Lake County Coroner's Office told CNN.
The Gary man in custody is a suspect in at least one of the deaths, police said in a statement that didn't explain why he had yet to be connected to the other deaths when authorities allege he confessed.
Police did not immediately return calls requesting more details.

Afrikka Hardy, 19 old


Anith Jones, 35 yr old
 

Lucianite

Registered User
there is this bruva being held in the Uinv VA murder + one other possibility
the UVA student is all over the news
while a sista found dead in the same area was never a media topic - not linked to the bruva.
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Eugene Robinson - (White) Women We Love


(White) Women We Love



By Eugene Robinson
Friday, June 10, 2005

Someday historians will look back at America in the decade bracketing the turn of the 21st century and identify the era's major themes: Religious fundamentalism. Terrorism. War in Iraq. Economic dislocation. Bioengineering. Information technology. Nuclear proliferation. Globalization. The rise of superpower China.

And, of course, Damsels in Distress.

Every few weeks, this stressed-out nation with more problems to worry about than hours in the day finds time to become obsessed with the saga -- it's always a "saga," never just a story -- of a damsel in distress. Natalee Holloway, the student who disappeared while on a class trip to the Caribbean island of Aruba, is the latest in what seems an endless series.

Holloway assumed the mantle from her predecessor, the Runaway Bride, who turned out not to have been in distress at all -- not physical distress, at least, though it's obvious that the prospect of her impending 600-guest wedding caused Jennifer Wilbanks an understandable measure of mental trauma.
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Before the Runaway Bride, there were too many damsels to provide a full list, but surely you remember the damsel elite: Laci Peterson. Elizabeth Smart. Lori Hacking. Chandra Levy. JonBenet Ramsey. We even found, or created, a damsel amid the chaos of war in Iraq: Jessica Lynch.

The specifics of the story line vary from damsel to damsel. In some cases, the saga begins with the discovery of a corpse. In other cases, the damsel simply vanishes into thin air. Often, there is a suspect from the beginning -- an intruder, a husband, a father, a congressman, a stranger glimpsed lurking nearby.

Sometimes the tale ends well, or well enough, as in the cases of Smart and Lynch. Let's hope it ends well for Holloway. But more often, it ends badly. Once in a great while, a case like Runaway Bride comes along to provide comic relief.

But of course the damsels have much in common besides being female. You probably have some idea of where I'm headed here.

A damsel must be white. This requirement is nonnegotiable. It helps if her frame is of dimensions that breathless cable television reporters can credibly describe as "petite," and it also helps if she's the kind of woman who wouldn't really mind being called "petite," a woman with a good deal of princess in her personality. She must be attractive -- also nonnegotiable. Her economic status should be middle class or higher, but an exception can be made in the case of wartime (see: Lynch).

Put all this together, and you get 24-7 coverage. The disappearance of a man, or of a woman of color, can generate a brief flurry, but never the full damsel treatment. Since the Holloway story broke we've had more news reports from Aruba this past week, I'd wager, than in the preceding 10 years.


I have no idea whether the late French philosopher Jacques Derrida hung on every twist and turn of the Chandra Levy case; somehow, I doubt he did. But I suspect the apostle of "deconstructionism" would have analyzed the damsel-in-distress phenomenon by explaining that our society is imposing its own subconsciously chosen narrative on all these cases.

It's the meta-narrative of something seen as precious and delicate being snatched away, defiled, destroyed by evil forces that lurk in the shadows, just outside the bedroom window. It's whiteness under siege. It's innocence and optimism crushed by cruel reality. It's a flower smashed by a rock.

Or maybe (since Derrida believed in multiple readings of a single text) the damsel thing is just a guaranteed cure for a slow news day. The cable news channels, after all, have lots of airtime to fill.

This is not to mock any one of these cases (except Runaway Bride) or to diminish the genuine tragedy experienced by family and friends. I can imagine the helplessness I'd feel if a child of mine disappeared from a remote beach in the Caribbean. But I can also be fairly confident that neither of my sons would provoke so many headlines.

Whatever our ultimate reason for singling out these few unfortunate victims, among the thousands of Americans who are murdered or who vanish each year, the pattern of choosing only young, white, middle-class women for the full damsel treatment says a lot about a nation that likes to believe it has consigned race and class to irrelevance.

What it says is that we haven't. What it says is that those stubborn issues are still very much alive and that they remain at the heart of the nation's deepest fears.

eugenerobinson@washpost.com
 

mz_JazE

Southern Belle
there is this bruva being held in the Uinv VA murder + one other possibility
the UVA student is all over the news
while a sista found dead in the same area was never a media topic - not linked to the bruva.
huh? link please
 

Lucianite

Registered User
huh? link please
Is 2009 Virginia death linked to Hannah Graham case? - CNN.com

Lynchburg, Virginia (CNN) -- Cassandra Morton never became a household name like some of the other women. Not like Morgan Harrington. Or Hannah Graham.
Even for the people in the historically black Tinbridge Hill neighborhood of Lynchburg, where sense of community and oral history thrive, memories of Morton are hazy.
"Wasn't she the girl whose body they found up on the mountain?" people ask.
Morton went missing on October 10, 2009. Several weeks later, a hiker discovered the 23-year-old's decomposed body on Candlers Mountain, near Camp Hydaway, a retreat owned by Jerry Falwell's Liberty University.
Lynchburg police and the Campbell County Sheriff's Office hunted for Morton's killer in vain. A year after her death, authorities admitted their leads had gone cold.

Cassandra Morton went missing in October 2009. Her body was found several weeks later.
As the years wore on, Morton's family learned to live without knowing who committed this heinous act. Or why she was robbed of life. Their hope of learning the truth diminished with time.
Until recently.
One night last month, University of Virginia student Hannah Graham disappeared after going out with friends. The arrest of a suspect in that case has prompted authorities to take another look at Morton's death and several other unsolved cases of women who were murdered, raped or went missing.
Police seize cab driven by Jesse Matthew Jesse Matthew accused of two sex assaults Jesse Matthew's background
Police have charged Jesse L. Matthew Jr. with abduction with the intent to defile in Graham's disappearance.
They said forensic evidence also links Matthew to at least two other cases: the death of Morgan Harrington, whose body was discovered in Albemarle County in 2010, and a 2005 rape of a 26-year-old woman in Fairfax City.
Matthew was also accused of a 2002 rape at Liberty University in Lynchburg, though charges were not pressed. The Campbell County Sheriff 's Office is investigating any possible connection between Matthew and Morton. Sheriff Steve Hutcherson declined further comment on an ongoing investigation.
The result of all this has been that suddenly, almost five years after her death, Morton's face is all over the media again. It has meant torture, all over again, for her mother, Catherine Morton.
She again felt the kind of shock that jolted her when police showed up at her doorstep several days after Thanksgiving 2009. They showed her a photograph of the body. She recognized her daughter's moccasins and beige jacket. They told her they had matched Cassandra's dental records to the body that was discovered.
Catherine fell to the floor.
"She hasn't been right ever since," says her husband and Cassandra's stepfather, Rawleigh Myers.
Police seize cab of man linked to 2009 death
Overshadowed by a 'damsel in distress'?
Cassandra Morton's cremated remains rest in an urn her mother keeps by her bed. It's a constant reminder of the daughter she lost; a reminder that her killer remains unpunished.
Every morning, Catherine Morton prays for her daughter's soul. She takes comfort in knowing that 250 people showed up at her daughter's funeral at the Tree of Life Ministries a few blocks up the road from her rented duplex on Campbell Avenue.
She swallows eight or nine pills a day to treat her depression and hypertension. There's not much she can do about the anger that rises within. Why did her daughter's death not make national headlines like Graham or Harrington? Why did no one from the state come to help her in her hour of grief and pain?
Morton's death was never big news. And it was always overshadowed by news about Harrington, who went missing six days after Morton vanished.
In fact, when Morton's body was discovered, some headlines wondered if it might be that of Harrington, whose parents had been vocal from the first day about their daughter's strange disappearance from a Metallica concert at the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville.
They appeared on television and created a website to seek justice for their daughter.
"There's been so much publicity about Morgan, about Hannah," Myers says.
He is blind in his left eye and suffers from high blood pressure. He used to work for the school system, then performed odd jobs here and there. But these days, he and Catherine Morton barely survive by collecting disability.
"The Harringtons can afford a reward to find their daughter's killer," he says, sitting on a small front porch cluttered with things. "We're poor and black. Nobody cares."

The photo that was used in newspapers and television when Morton went missing was, ironically, a police mug shot.
His stepdaughter, Myers says, didn't fit the profile of missing women who make headlines. Like Elizabeth Smart, Laci Peterson and Natalee Holloway. Or Harrington and Graham.
"It's hard to deny that race has something to do with the fact that attractive young white women get vastly more coverage when they disappear," says A. Barton Hinkle, an editorial writer at the Richmond Times-Dispatch, who wrote about the so-called Missing White Woman Syndrome in a recent column.
The Washington Post's Eugene Robinson first described the media fascination in a 2005 column in which he described "Damsels in Distress."
"A damsel must be white. This requirement is nonnegotiable. It helps if her frame is of dimensions that breathless cable television reporters can credibly describe as 'petite,' and it also helps if she's the kind of woman who wouldn't really mind being called 'petite,' a woman with a good deal of princess in her personality. She must be attractive -- also nonnegotiable. Her economic status should be middle class or higher, but an exception can be made in the case of wartime.
"Put all this together, and you get 24-7 coverage," Robinson wrote. "The disappearance of a man, or of a woman of color, can generate a brief flurry, but never the full damsel treatment."
Hannah Graham's parents' emotional plea Graham suspect linked to yet another case
Similar comments were made in Cleveland, after the bodies of 11 black women were found in a "house of horrors" in 2009.
"In all their coverage, sympathetic as it may be, the [Cleveland] Plain Dealer never raises the bigger issue. What made these women such easy targets was being black, being women and being from the highly segregated and desperately poor east side of Cleveland," Angie Schmitt, founding editor of Rust Wire, wrote a year after the bodies were discovered.
"Nobody was going to tear up the city looking for a few black women from the east side with sketchy pasts."
Justice for everyone?
Morton grew up in and around Lynchburg one of three siblings. Her parents separated, and when Catherine Morton married Myers about 12 years ago, he embraced her as his own.
Myers never had much contact with his own daughter from a previous relationship; Cassandra filled that void. He loved to hear her call him "Daddy."
Myers adjusts the baseball cap hugging his head. "Relax," it says. "God is in control."
But he is far from relaxed talking about Cassandra. Catherine Morton decided she had had enough of journalists after Graham's case made the news. She had agreed to speak with me but changed her mind. She makes it clear she's upset her daughter's name has been dredged up again. She tells her husband to "keep it short."
But Meyers wants to talk. He wants to keep Cassandra's memory alive. At a vigil last year organized by "Help Save The Next Girl," a group started by Harrington's parents, Myers spoke publicly about Cassandra.
"She was loved," he told the crowd, among them the families of nine Virginia women whose cases remain unresolved.
Myers says his stepdaughter wasn't perfect. She had fallen in and out of trouble, moved from one home to another. She was arrested in 2005 for theft. The photo that was used in newspapers and television when she went missing was, ironically, a police mug shot.

Rawleigh Myers says the slaying of his stepdaughter, Cassandra Morton, has not received much attention.
 

Lucianite

Registered User
Rawleigh Myers says the slaying of his stepdaughter, Cassandra Morton, has not received much attention.
She dabbled with drugs and men, Meyers says. She got pregnant and gave birth to two daughters. She was supposed to check into a rehabilitation facility two days after she went missing.
She did not fit the picture of the all-American girl next door. But that, says her family, doesn't mean she should go without justice.
Authorities have not said anything about the evidence they have on Matthew. Cassandra Morton's family has no idea whether she, Hannah Graham and Morgan Harrington are linked in some chilling way.
They know only this: For the first time in years, they harbor hope again of learning the truth, however brutal that might be.
 

mz_JazE

Southern Belle
Is 2009 Virginia death linked to Hannah Graham case? - CNN.com

Lynchburg, Virginia (CNN) -- Cassandra Morton never became a household name like some of the other women. Not like Morgan Harrington. Or Hannah Graham.
Even for the people in the historically black Tinbridge Hill neighborhood of Lynchburg, where sense of community and oral history thrive, memories of Morton are hazy.
"Wasn't she the girl whose body they found up on the mountain?" people ask.
Morton went missing on October 10, 2009. Several weeks later, a hiker discovered the 23-year-old's decomposed body on Candlers Mountain, near Camp Hydaway, a retreat owned by Jerry Falwell's Liberty University.
Lynchburg police and the Campbell County Sheriff's Office hunted for Morton's killer in vain. A year after her death, authorities admitted their leads had gone cold.

Cassandra Morton went missing in October 2009. Her body was found several weeks later.
As the years wore on, Morton's family learned to live without knowing who committed this heinous act. Or why she was robbed of life. Their hope of learning the truth diminished with time.
Until recently.
One night last month, University of Virginia student Hannah Graham disappeared after going out with friends. The arrest of a suspect in that case has prompted authorities to take another look at Morton's death and several other unsolved cases of women who were murdered, raped or went missing.
Police seize cab driven by Jesse Matthew Jesse Matthew accused of two sex assaults Jesse Matthew's background
Police have charged Jesse L. Matthew Jr. with abduction with the intent to defile in Graham's disappearance.
They said forensic evidence also links Matthew to at least two other cases: the death of Morgan Harrington, whose body was discovered in Albemarle County in 2010, and a 2005 rape of a 26-year-old woman in Fairfax City.
Matthew was also accused of a 2002 rape at Liberty University in Lynchburg, though charges were not pressed. The Campbell County Sheriff 's Office is investigating any possible connection between Matthew and Morton. Sheriff Steve Hutcherson declined further comment on an ongoing investigation.
The result of all this has been that suddenly, almost five years after her death, Morton's face is all over the media again. It has meant torture, all over again, for her mother, Catherine Morton.
She again felt the kind of shock that jolted her when police showed up at her doorstep several days after Thanksgiving 2009. They showed her a photograph of the body. She recognized her daughter's moccasins and beige jacket. They told her they had matched Cassandra's dental records to the body that was discovered.
Catherine fell to the floor.
"She hasn't been right ever since," says her husband and Cassandra's stepfather, Rawleigh Myers.
Police seize cab of man linked to 2009 death
Overshadowed by a 'damsel in distress'?
Cassandra Morton's cremated remains rest in an urn her mother keeps by her bed. It's a constant reminder of the daughter she lost; a reminder that her killer remains unpunished.
Every morning, Catherine Morton prays for her daughter's soul. She takes comfort in knowing that 250 people showed up at her daughter's funeral at the Tree of Life Ministries a few blocks up the road from her rented duplex on Campbell Avenue.
She swallows eight or nine pills a day to treat her depression and hypertension. There's not much she can do about the anger that rises within. Why did her daughter's death not make national headlines like Graham or Harrington? Why did no one from the state come to help her in her hour of grief and pain?
Morton's death was never big news. And it was always overshadowed by news about Harrington, who went missing six days after Morton vanished.
In fact, when Morton's body was discovered, some headlines wondered if it might be that of Harrington, whose parents had been vocal from the first day about their daughter's strange disappearance from a Metallica concert at the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville.
They appeared on television and created a website to seek justice for their daughter.
"There's been so much publicity about Morgan, about Hannah," Myers says.
He is blind in his left eye and suffers from high blood pressure. He used to work for the school system, then performed odd jobs here and there. But these days, he and Catherine Morton barely survive by collecting disability.
"The Harringtons can afford a reward to find their daughter's killer," he says, sitting on a small front porch cluttered with things. "We're poor and black. Nobody cares."

The photo that was used in newspapers and television when Morton went missing was, ironically, a police mug shot.
His stepdaughter, Myers says, didn't fit the profile of missing women who make headlines. Like Elizabeth Smart, Laci Peterson and Natalee Holloway. Or Harrington and Graham.
"It's hard to deny that race has something to do with the fact that attractive young white women get vastly more coverage when they disappear," says A. Barton Hinkle, an editorial writer at the Richmond Times-Dispatch, who wrote about the so-called Missing White Woman Syndrome in a recent column.
The Washington Post's Eugene Robinson first described the media fascination in a 2005 column in which he described "Damsels in Distress."
"A damsel must be white. This requirement is nonnegotiable. It helps if her frame is of dimensions that breathless cable television reporters can credibly describe as 'petite,' and it also helps if she's the kind of woman who wouldn't really mind being called 'petite,' a woman with a good deal of princess in her personality. She must be attractive -- also nonnegotiable. Her economic status should be middle class or higher, but an exception can be made in the case of wartime.
"Put all this together, and you get 24-7 coverage," Robinson wrote. "The disappearance of a man, or of a woman of color, can generate a brief flurry, but never the full damsel treatment."
Hannah Graham's parents' emotional plea Graham suspect linked to yet another case
Similar comments were made in Cleveland, after the bodies of 11 black women were found in a "house of horrors" in 2009.
"In all their coverage, sympathetic as it may be, the [Cleveland] Plain Dealer never raises the bigger issue. What made these women such easy targets was being black, being women and being from the highly segregated and desperately poor east side of Cleveland," Angie Schmitt, founding editor of Rust Wire, wrote a year after the bodies were discovered.
"Nobody was going to tear up the city looking for a few black women from the east side with sketchy pasts."
Justice for everyone?
Morton grew up in and around Lynchburg one of three siblings. Her parents separated, and when Catherine Morton married Myers about 12 years ago, he embraced her as his own.
Myers never had much contact with his own daughter from a previous relationship; Cassandra filled that void. He loved to hear her call him "Daddy."
Myers adjusts the baseball cap hugging his head. "Relax," it says. "God is in control."
But he is far from relaxed talking about Cassandra. Catherine Morton decided she had had enough of journalists after Graham's case made the news. She had agreed to speak with me but changed her mind. She makes it clear she's upset her daughter's name has been dredged up again. She tells her husband to "keep it short."
But Meyers wants to talk. He wants to keep Cassandra's memory alive. At a vigil last year organized by "Help Save The Next Girl," a group started by Harrington's parents, Myers spoke publicly about Cassandra.
"She was loved," he told the crowd, among them the families of nine Virginia women whose cases remain unresolved.
Myers says his stepdaughter wasn't perfect. She had fallen in and out of trouble, moved from one home to another. She was arrested in 2005 for theft. The photo that was used in newspapers and television when she went missing was, ironically, a police mug shot.

Rawleigh Myers says the slaying of his stepdaughter, Cassandra Morton, has not received much attention.
It sure as hell didn't! I don't think it even came up in the last month. If it did it got "white washed" (literally) by the media.
 
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