Soul Power: Music festival in Zaire 1974

Mrs. Campbell

Girl Crush
The festival was part of the Ali/Foreman fight. To my absolute and utter delight, I happened to catch it last night while flipping channels. I've seen it on more than one occasion, but can watch it a million times over.

Awwwwwwwsome! :clapping: :clapping:

Special shout out to Queen Celia...Azuuuucaaaaar!!!!!!!!!!!!!

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DzAylBftstQ?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Seawall

Registered User
The festival was part of the Ali/Foreman fight. To my absolute and utter delight, I happened to catch it last night while flipping channels. I've seen it on more than one occasion, but can watch it a million times over.

Awwwwwwwsome! :clapping: :clapping:

Special shout out to Queen Celia...Azuuuucaaaaar!!!!!!!!!!!!!

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DzAylBftstQ?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Great moment in history. Celia with Fania and Tabu Ley killed. I've read an interview with Pacheco where he said that when James Brown emerged from the plane and saw the cheering Zairians, he assumed that they were there for him. He was disappointed when he realized that the cheers were for Celia, Pacheco and Fania
 

Seawall

Registered User
Fania Records' Founding Fathers : NPR

"Fania was also known for emphasizing the African roots to its various Caribbean-American musical styles. For example, Pacheco's song "Acuyuye" was inspired by a children's chant he heard while visiting Africa. And the Fania All-Stars performed alongside the 1974 Muhammad Ali-George Foreman boxing match in Zaire, billed as the "Rumble in the Jungle."

"Well, something happened that really moved me," Pacheco says. "'Cause I was in Africa about seven or eight times before we went to Zaire. And the plane was full of entertainers. But the honcho that was there was James Brown.

"So when we landed in Africa, he wanted to be the first one out of the plane. So he comes out of the plane to go like this, 'My peoples! My peoples! My lovely people!' And there have been 5,000 Africans. And they went past him, and they started chanting, 'Pa-che-co! Pa-che-co!' They went bananas."

Despite its roots in Africa and the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, Pacheco describes the salsa movement as a specific byproduct of New York.

"It is Cuban music," Pacheco says. "But the thing is, like, the idea came because we had Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans in the Fania All-Stars; two Jews and an Englishman. And when you make a salsa, you have different condiments. I said, 'This is perfect to cook a salsa.'""
 

rayt2009

Radiant Silvergun
This was an epic show. Got it saved to my dvr. Was moved by Ceila Cruz' stirring performance and Bill Withers moved me to shed a tear. Great Show. JB = GOAT
 
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