Calypo Influenced French Antillean oldies

Seawall

Registered User
Fairly new release of Antillean music from the 50's and 60's. It's a good documentation of the impact of calypso and Cuban music on French Antillean song forms.




Here's a featured artist. This song isn't on the CD, but one has to post what can be found on youtube.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3x7fEngL2tA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ouedCHsl9q8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

A later tune from when the cadence had taken hold.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/P4xIi7od5SA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Fairly new release of Antillean music from the 50's and 60's. It's a good documentation of the impact of calypso and Cuban music on French Antillean song forms.




Here's a featured artist. This song isn't on the CD, but one has to post what can be found on youtube.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/3x7fEngL2tA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/ouedCHsl9q8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

A later tune from when the cadence had taken hold.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/P4xIi7od5SA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Nice post Seawall which basically confirms what the Mighty Sparrow said about Calypso's early influence on the development of other Caribbean music genres in this interview.

Mighty Sparrow - Calypso as Mother music
<iframe width="560" height="350" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BMkKbltjEEo?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Go to 4:50 to hear exactly what Sparrow had to say

Btw what year would you guys say that Cadence music took hold in Haiti, or can you give a period like late 60's or early 70's? And finally can you post one of the earliest examples of a Haitian Cadence song or is that last 1972 cadence song that Seawall posted just above by the Guitar Boys Orchestra from Guadeloupe one of the earliest examples?
Many thanks in advance for your feedback.
 

Seawall

Registered User
Nice post Seawall which basically confirms what the Mighty Sparrow said about Calypso's early influence on the development of other Caribbean music genres in this interview.

Mighty Sparrow - Calypso as Mother music
<iframe width="560" height="350" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/BMkKbltjEEo?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Go to 4:50 to hear exactly what Sparrow had to say

Btw what year would you guys say that Cadence music took hold in Haiti, or can you give a period like late 60's or early 70's? And finally can you post one of the earliest examples of a Haitian Cadence song or is that last 1972 cadence song that Seawall posted just above by the Guitar Boys Orchestra from Guadeloupe one of the earliest examples?
Many thanks in advance for your feedback.
Don't get carried away, I think that the dominant non creole influence has always been Afro Latin music. Martinique and Guadeloupe had their beguine, belair, mazurka, and other traditional and pop forms, however, calypso was influential, but clearly not as much as Cuban and Haitian music. Haitian music was influenced by calypso also, but the music of DR and Cuba played a more important role. And Haitian music influenced calypso also as can be heard in the video below. Caribbean musicians borrowed from many genres.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/COfMzF9dr_k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

I can post calypso mixed with beguine also.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/n-xnU--SPnw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Something I found.
Begin The Beguine... Roots of Calypso, Compas and Zouk
by Marcus Doucette

September 26 2012


Sound Travels to Martinique and Guadaloupe all week to find the roots of the Antillean and to a certain degree, Caribbean music. The style has a name: biguine, and it is pretty much the common denominator of music from the Lesser Antilles and particularly the French Antilles. Rhythm-centric, it began in Martinique in the 19th century. Born in fields worked by Africans and is another example of how fresh music becomes when cultures come into contact.
It became globally known when Cole Porter wrote one of his most famous songs Begin the Beguine in 1935 - a pun in the title, and not at all a biguine song. The style's real fame is that it is the predecessor of numerous modern Caribbean musical styles such as calypso, compas, zouk, Dominican merengue and many others.

Yesterday, we heard some examples of the drum beguine, which as you heard, is centered around a main drum and several sycophants in poly-rhythmic bliss. Today however, it was all orchestral beguine, which adds Western instrumentation drawing from the big band sound that was paradigmatic in the early part of this century when beguine was born. Dope stuff!
Looking to get into that early Antillean vibe? Your caribbean party needs the impressive comp on Soundway Records called TUMBÉLÉ! Biguine, afro & latin sounds from the French Caribbean, 1963-74, you won't be disappointed and you can find many of the songs on this comp in what I played for y'all today.
- See more at: Begin The Beguine... Roots of Calypso, Compas and Zouk | 88Nine Radio Milwaukee

<iframe width="100%" height="166" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/61256480&color=ff5500"></iframe>
 

Seawall

Registered User
From the CD booklet of Biguine, afro & latin sounds from the French Caribbean, 1963-74. This is a crucial compilation.




"The biguine has much the same role as calypso in Trinidad, taking in everything from social commentary to bawdy innuendos and self-aggrandizement. Biguines are composed for competitions, carnivals and to comment on current affairs.

Apart from the islands themselves, Haiti had the strongest outside influence on the music of Martinique and Guadeloupe in the early 60’s. The cadence rampa and compas direct ruled the grands bals of Martinique and Guadeloupe, mixed up with Cuban-style guaguancos and chas chas."


As you can see above, kaiso has many sister genres throughout the Caribbean. The plena, son, bachata are just 3 of these genres.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
@Seawall:

I am aware of Beguine music as both of those songs you posted I heard while growing up in Trinidad. I don't think Beguine came before Calypso, but maybe it could be regarded as a sister genre to Calypso.
I guess some of these early mother genres like Calypso, Beguine and Belair influenced each other to a certain extent in the early days as they were developing.
Sparrow is spot on in his assessment of Calypso's early influence on the development of other Caribbean music genres.

However I can't believe you posted all that side stuff and did not even attempt to answer by main questions.
Let's try again for a second time:

What year would you guys say that Cadence music took hold in Haiti, or can you give a period like late 60's or early 70's? And finally can you post one of the earliest examples of a Haitian Cadence song? Or is that last 1972 cadence song above by the Guitar Boys Orchestra from Guadeloupe one of the earliest examples you can find?
Many thanks in advance for your feedback.
 

Seawall

Registered User
"The history of the biguine goes back to the mid 19th century, just following the Martinique emancipation of slaves in 1848." - Encyclopedia of Latin American Popular Music
edited by George Torres

As for the compas direk and cadence rampa roots in Haiti, that topic has been discussed here already. This topic is about biguine and the impact of calypso and Afro Latin music. The cha cha and calypso were perhaps the most popular pop forms during the '50's (in the Caribbean), and influenced Antillean bands. The Guitar Boys Orchestra from Guadeloupe were just one of the groups on the CD, their inclusion documented the early '70's sound of cadence. There were many other Antillean orchestras, starting from the late 50's, from the inception of the compas direk (introduced in 1955), that had already incorporated the Haitian rhythm. Also, some Haitian groups were residing and recording in the French Antilles and left an impact. Then Ryco Jazz from the Congo entered the scene in the mid to late '60's. All of these ingredients led to zouk.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
"The history of the biguine goes back to the mid 19th century, just following the Martinique emancipation of slaves in 1848." - Encyclopedia of Latin American Popular Music
edited by George Torres

As for the compas direk and cadence rampa roots in Haiti, that topic has been discussed here already. This topic is about biguine and the impact of calypso and Afro Latin music. The cha cha and calypso were perhaps the most popular pop forms during the '50's (in the Caribbean), and influenced Antillean bands. The Guitar Boys Orchestra from Guadeloupe were just one of the groups on the CD, their inclusion documented the early '70's sound of cadence. There were many other Antillean orchestras, starting from the late 50's, from the inception of the compas direk (introduced in 1955), that had already incorporated the Haitian rhythm. Also, some Haitian groups were residing and recording in the French Antilles and left an impact. Then Ryco Jazz from the Congo entered the scene in the mid to late '60's. All of these ingredients led to zouk.
So based on Compas direk being introduced in 1955 would you say that Cadence rampa took hold in Haiti and then in Guadeloupe and other Antillean islands by the late 50's, the early 60's or the late 60's?

My question to you is based off of you posting this comment and 1972 cadence song in this thread.
A later tune from when the cadence had taken hold.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/P4xIi7od5SA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

tikreyol

Got Kompa?
Great thread Seawall. Afropop has some great info in their Story of French Caribbean music podcast. It's no surprise Calypso had its day with the proximity and popularity of it. I even hear Machel and Patrice on their radio stations. But of course it was eclipsed by all the Haitian/Cuban music that exploded onto the scene. Between the Creole and Latin scene we all share this "bal" like music scene.
 

Seawall

Registered User
Years ago, when zouk CDs were easily available at Tower and Virgin Records, I bought this gem by Ralph Thamar. It has a few calypso cuts, but I couldn't find any clips on youtube.


01. Elle Ne Pense Qu'à L'amour (Bomba)
02. Au Bon Temps Des Caravelles (Calypso Lent)
03. Les Prénoms Des Filles (Calypso)
04. Cordonniers Et Coiffeurs (Biguine - Zouk)
05. La Sérénade (Biguine Lente)
06. Les Filles De La Martinique (Mazurka)
07. Bon Dieu Bon (Calypso)
08. Philosophie (Merengue)
09. Sans Chemise Et Sans Pantalon (Biguine Jazz)
10. Maximilien (Calypso)
11. Cé Les Antilles (Biguine Sentimentale)
12. La Marseillaise Noire (Hymne Afro-Caribéen)
Ralph THAMAR : La Marseillaise Noire

Here the legend with a pan jazz band. Don't know if the band is French Antillean or European.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/YvHuAqkso4k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 
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