Which Anglo Caribbean accent has the strongest affinity of African influence?

Inquistive

New member
Unlike Jamaica, Guyana or Trinidad, Barbados was the destination of few African-born slaves after 1800.[8] Thus, African blacks became "Bajanized" relatively early on in the island's history. This tended to make them less resistant to local culture, with its Anglicised language, religion and customs.

As in most English-based Caribbean creoles, the interdentals /θ/ and /ð/ have merged with other consonants (in this case, /t/ and /d/, respectively).[11] Unlike most other Caribbean creoles[citation needed], Bajan is rhotic[citation needed]. Bajan has a strong tendency to realize word-final /t/ as a glottal stop [ʔ]. Thus the Bajan pronunciation of start, [stɑːɹʔ], contrasts sharply with the pronunciation of other Caribbean speakers[citation needed], [staːt] or [stɑːt] or [staːɹt][citation needed].
The word for you (plural) is wuna, similar to Jamaican unnu / unna or Bahamian yinna. Unlike Standard English, Bajan tends towards using a zero copula.
Questions are usually pronounced as a statement with a raised intonation; usually on the last word; to indicate that it is a question e.g. Wunna win de cricket? means "Did you (pl.) win the cricket match?"; dah you own? means "Is that yours?"
Habitual actions are usually indicated by the word does and done, for example I does guh church punna Sunduh means "I go to church on Sundays", or I done guh church pon Sunduh "I went to church on Sunday". It is quite common for this to be shortened to I's guh church pun Sunduh.[citation needed]
Verbs in Bajan are not conjugated for tense, which is inferred from time words e.g. I eat all de food yestuhday = "I ate all of the food yesterday", where the word yesterday indicates that the action happened in the past.[citation needed]
The word gine is usually used to mark the future tense e.g. I gine eat = "I am going to eat".[citation needed]
Ain't (frequently shortened to ain') is used as a negative marker e.g. "I didn't do that" becomes I ain' do dat/dah. It is not uncommon for the I and the ain' to be pronounced in Bajan as "Ah'n" i.e. "Ah'n do dah" or "Ah'n able".


Maybe Swaggerific could enlighten himself.
 

Farinborn

readin btwn da lines
How can any of them sound African when they were taught English by the same Europeans that colonized Africa? I would say thatmanyof them have a few words from Africa intertwined with the local dialect of the W.I. But to sound African..........

The Africans don't even sound the same when speaking English....you ever heard a Ghanaian and a Nigerian argue............?
 
How can any of them sound African when they were taught English by the same Europeans that colonized Africa? I would say thatmanyof them have a few words from Africa intertwined with the local dialect of the W.I. But to sound African..........

The Africans don't even sound the same when speaking English....you ever heard a Ghanaian and a Nigerian argue............?
Opti's brain is fried
 

Inquistive

New member
How can any of them sound African when they were taught English by the same Europeans that colonized Africa? I would say thatmanyof them have a few words from Africa intertwined with the local dialect of the W.I. But to sound African..........

The Africans don't even sound the same when speaking English....you ever heard a Ghanaian and a Nigerian argue............?
Anything that doesn't sound indigenous to standard English is more than likely African. At least in the Caribbean
 

Farinborn

readin btwn da lines
Anything that doesn't sound indigenous to standard English is more than likely African. At least in the Caribbean
So according to your insert, we all speaking African when we type or vocalize in the following manner.........

You want ah bumbuu.c.l.a.t box inna you head weh favor on drop dung coconat....Ndis yah tred nuh mek it star. Is like unno ah reach fi di knife an nuh know seh ah di blade you grab.....
 

Inquistive

New member
So according to your insert, we all speaking African when we type or vocalize in the following manner.........

You want ah bumbuu.c.l.a.t box inna you head weh favor on drop dung coconat....Ndis yah tred nuh mek it star. Is like unno ah reach fi di knife an nuh know seh ah di blade you grab.....
Yeah, pretty much


I'm not gonna play Devil's Advocate with you though.
 

Farinborn

readin btwn da lines
Yeah, pretty much


I'm not gonna play Devil's Advocate with you though.
You don't have to. Word for word they sound different they have over 20 dialects in one town the size of Brooklyn. When they convers with one another at the market, they all speak the same common language with a different accent.

I overstand your argument, but the question should be "how much influence does the African language influence/ed the Caribbean dialect.However, there is no African language. Only languages pertaining to particular countries and groups of people. So you still need to narrow it down...
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
In St.Lucia I though when some of the locals spoke the accent sounded slightly like something I'd heard in an African movie.
 

TC

Steuuuupssss!
Yeah they don't sound too sophisticated , e.g the West Indies cricket captain
Other than certain parts of London amoung certain classes of people I am not certain that I have ever heard an accent of any speaker of English(as a group) that sounds sophisticated.
 
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