Report provides details on Caribbean immigrants in the United States

LGN

Registered User
Report provides details on Caribbean immigrants in the United States

A new study published by the Washington-based Centre for Immigration Studies (CIS) has revealed that 6% of the 7.9 million immigrants who have moved to the United States in the last five years are from the Caribbean. Between 2000 and 2005, 467,000 Caribbean immigrants went to the United States.

Cuba accounted for the most immigrants with a total of 128,000. The Dominican Republic followed closely with 121,000, while Haiti and Jamaica followed with 91,000 and 62,000 respectively.

The report estimates that between 3.6 and 3.8 million, or almost half, of the 7.9 million new arrivals are illegal immigrants.

According to the CIS study, there are just over 35 million foreign-born people living in the United States. By far the largest number of foreign-born people ? 10.8 million - have Mexico as their country of origin. Cuba is the country of origin for 948,000 people, the Dominican Republic for 695,000, Jamaica for 607,000, and Haiti for 570,000.

The report finds that immigrants to the United States experience considerably worse quality of life compared to those described as ?natives?. The poverty rate for immigrants and their US-born children (under 18) is 18.4%, compared to a rate of 11.7% for natives and their children.

Immigrants from the Dominican Republic and Haiti fare worse than the average for immigrants from all countries. Twenty-five per cent of immigrants from the Dominican Republic ? 174,000 people ? live in poverty. Over 20% of immigrants from Haiti ? 117,000 people - live in poverty.

The main reason for the high poverty rates is given as poor education, leading to only poorly paid jobs. Of adult immigrants, 31% have not completed high school, three-and-a-half times the rate for natives. More than a third - 36.7% - of immigrants from the Dominican Republic have not completed high school. Immigrants from Haiti scored somewhat higher with only 27.2% of them not having completed their secondary education. The percentage for native-born inhabitants of the United States is 9%.

The CIS study also finds that one-third of all immigrants lack health insurance, making it difficult, if not impossible, to receive basic health care. Nearly 43% of immigrants from Haiti are uninsured, while the rate for those from the Dominican Republic is 30.5%.

The full report is available online at http://www.cis.org/
 

Empressdududahlin

Dawtah of the Sun
Check this:


Black Americans
Click here for publications on this topic​

One of the facts of American history seldom discussed is the nation's long-standing preference for immigrant labor, when the alternative was to train and employ native-born black Americans. Historically, blacks have been regarded as a residual labor pool and were drawn into the urban, industrial economy only when the preferred immigrant supply was not available. As a consequence, spokesmen for black Americans historically opposed mass immigration.

Today, as manufacturing and industrial jobs continue to decline, the competition for the remaining blue-collar jobs intensifies, and when this happens black Americans lose for a variety of reasons ranging from racial stereotypes to employer preference for vulnerable workers fearing deportation


I'm interested in finding out about the statistics of the other Caribbean islands as well (starts to search)... thanks for this link
 

LGN

Registered User
soca_souljah said:
:read:

Looks more like a Cuba, Hispanola, Jamaica research
Point being?
If you want to know how many migrated from M'rat to US from 2000 to 2005 it was the highest total ever from M'rat :4.5 People, 90% of Montserrat's whole popluation.
0.5 counts for the person wid no legs.
 

LGN

Registered User
HoneyEmpress said:
Check this:


Black Americans
Click here for publications on this topic​

One of the facts of American history seldom discussed is the nation's long-standing preference for immigrant labor, when the alternative was to train and employ native-born black Americans. Historically, blacks have been regarded as a residual labor pool and were drawn into the urban, industrial economy only when the preferred immigrant supply was not available. As a consequence, spokesmen for black Americans historically opposed mass immigration.

Today, as manufacturing and industrial jobs continue to decline, the competition for the remaining blue-collar jobs intensifies, and when this happens black Americans lose for a variety of reasons ranging from racial stereotypes to employer preference for vulnerable workers fearing deportation


I'm interested in finding out about the statistics of the other Caribbean islands as well (starts to search)... thanks for this link
If interested as well. find anything tell me. I do have a link somewhere that tells how many of each ethnic(some by nationality) group lives in Canada. Probably not correct to the mark as some dont fill in the census and illegal immigrants out there as well.
 
Top