Nice Washington Post Article on TnT Carnival

Bake n Shark

Gangsta Boogie
Trinidad Kicks Off Carnival Extravaganza

By PAISLEY DODDS
The Associated Press
Monday, February 7, 2005; 3:19 PM

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad - Masqueraders covered themselves in mud and motor oil Monday to start Carnival, swaggering through the streets to pounding beats and having one last dirty dance before showering and slipping into jeweled bikinis and feathered headdresses.

Tens of thousands of people spilled into the streets for J'Ouvert, which means opening, a tradition where revelers douse themselves in mud and oil before dawn to honor black masqueraders who fought against British soldiers in 1881 to hold their Carnival. Even during Carnival's tamer days more than a century ago, some considered the festivities lewd.

"The only thing bad about Carnival is the end of Carnival!" said Glenn Rollins, 43, with bloodshot eyes and a wide smile.

Fueled by concoctions of rum, coffee and tobacco, men donned dresses and women painted on beards Monday as they gyrated behind vibrating speakers, flicking streams of mud, oil and paint at observers. Some barely dressed at all, their bodies caked in dirt, as they grabbed bystanders from the shadows and flung them into a sweaty sea of bodies.

Although Caribbean revelers wear more clothes than Carnival dancers in Rio de Janiero, the dances are less choreographed and more raucous than the ones in Brazil.

Trinidad's Carnival reaches its climax Tuesday when all the masquerade bands - more than 50 this year - strut across the Queen's Park Savannah in their glittering costumes. The bands put on part of their fancy costumes for pre-parades across the city on Monday.

Carnival was introduced to Trinidad by French immigrants in the 1700s. Before Ash Wednesday and Lent, plantation owners doused themselves in molasses and dressed up as slaves. The slaves - celebrating the end of the harvest - in turn dressed up to parody their masters.

Today, the celebrations have become the Caribbean's biggest and most lavish bash, drawing more than 1 million people from the region and Diaspora - almost doubling the Caribbean nation's population of 1.3 million - and generating about $1 billion in business.

"Every year the festivities just get better," said Kamel Hamid, 52, who came from Toronto. "But it has been 30 years since I last saw J'Ouvert."

Monday's festivities began with a competition for Carnival king and queen, summoning masqueraders disguised as fire-breathing dragons, glittery grim reapers and a huge translucent butterfly. The masqueraders were followed by the crowning of a Calypso monarch.

Band leaders attached intricate and heavy costumes - some as wide as a large tree canopy and as high as 30 feet - for the competition that began on Dimanche Gras, or Carnival Sunday, and faded into the darkness and another day as Monday rolled around.

"Sleep? No, I've barely slept, but I don't feel so bad," said Johanna Schmidt, 23, from Berlin, clasping a dented can of energy drink.

Curtis Eustace was crowned king for his towering costume of an orange and black dragon, adorned by golden skulls on its expansive sparkling appendages. Pamela Gordon was crowned queen for her giant translucent butterfly that was as big as a dump truck.

One masquerader wore a sparkling grim reaper-like figure attached to his body that towered over his head and shot out white firecrackers. Another costume was a lanky white vulture with bulging eyes, an expansive purple and red wingspan and a troupe of fire-blowing devil dancers.

Other female costumes included a gargantuan orange and gold Indian princess and a Carmen Miranda-like costume laden with fruit and giant fake parrots lifting the masquerader's skirt.

One of the celebration's oldest staples has been the Calypso competition. Calypso, with its pulsating beats and political satire, is rooted in African traditions of improvised songs.

This year's artists included well-known Calypso stars such as Chalkdust, who was crowned this year's Calypso monarch for his song "Ah doh Rhyme." The song is about how anger over Trinidad's political corruption and exploited gas and oil reserves keeps him from rhyming.

"The poetry of Calypsonians is known across the world," said Winston Smith, 23, of Brooklyn, N.Y. "It doesn't matter if you're from the Caribbean or American. What matters is that these people are talking about things politicians don't have the guts to tackle."
 

SexyJ

New member
That was a nice article! I wish I had known before today that this article was written in the washington post b/c I would have cut the article out.
 

Bake n Shark

Gangsta Boogie
SexyJ said:
That was a nice article! I wish I had known before today that this article was written in the washington post b/c I would have cut the article out.
It's still available online...go to the Washingtonpost.com's home page..."World"..."Americas"...."Caribbean"..."Trinidad & Tobago". There are a series of articles relating to TnT there...some as old as 5 years (Kitch's death). Also pick up a copy of the (free) Washington Post Express newspaper (at the Metro Stations and elsewhere), there's a picture of a young lady in costume from TnT carnival on the cover...the caption reads "Carnival l Costume Party"...
 

Socaboy

look meh!
Nice article...I was vex not one paper in NYC said ah peep about Carnival...only the Metro had ah small corner about J'ouvert, but that was it...STEUPS!!!!!!! With the amount of West Indians in this city makes you realise we really don't have a voice here.
 

Rummy

Rum Aficionado/Soca-holic
better than the one in today's Sun-Sentinel:
Carnival climaxes with teens' jailbreak

PORT-OF-SPAIN · Heavy on sequins, feathers and bravado, bleary-eyed masqueraders donned their extravagant outfits one more time Tuesday as Trinidad's famed Carnival roared to a climax, while police rounded up 10 teenagers who broke out of jail to attend the party.

Tens of thousands of revelers spilled into the streets for the big finale, most of them oblivious to the jail break and isolated clashes that killed at least two people.

Fifty masquerade bands of marchers and musicians strutted in a blur of glitter and feathers across Queen's Park Savannah in the capital of Port-of-Spain.

Celebrations were disrupted, however, when a truck piled high with speakers knocked down two electricity polls, flinging live wires on revelers.
 

Bake n Shark

Gangsta Boogie
Rummacita said:
better than the one in today's Sun-Sentinel:
Carnival climaxes with teens' jailbreak

PORT-OF-SPAIN · Heavy on sequins, feathers and bravado, bleary-eyed masqueraders donned their extravagant outfits one more time Tuesday as Trinidad's famed Carnival roared to a climax, while police rounded up 10 teenagers who broke out of jail to attend the party.

Tens of thousands of revelers spilled into the streets for the big finale, most of them oblivious to the jail break and isolated clashes that killed at least two people.

Fifty masquerade bands of marchers and musicians strutted in a blur of glitter and feathers across Queen's Park Savannah in the capital of Port-of-Spain.

Celebrations were disrupted, however, when a truck piled high with speakers knocked down two electricity polls, flinging live wires on revelers.
Facking Cubans :devil
 

Shandy 2.0

God is my pilot
Rummacita said:
Like they took the worst news to report from the Trini papers.
Why even bother reporting. That is some shitty journalism right there.

It's like the reporter took a bunch of fragments from different artilces and pasted them together. And only the bad ones to get that sensationalism nonsense.
 

Bake n Shark

Gangsta Boogie
shandy said:
Why even bother reporting. That is some shitty journalism right there.

It's like the reporter took a bunch of fragments from different artilces and pasted them together. And only the bad ones to get that sensationalism nonsense.
Dat's arrite though...as much as we welcome more people tuh pass thru and take part in an experience unlike any other, we sure ent begging friend from nobody. Who want tuh malign and what not let them carry on....
 

Shandy 2.0

God is my pilot
Bake n Shark said:
Dat's arrite though...as much as we welcome more people tuh pass thru and take part in an experience unlike any other, we sure ent begging friend from nobody. Who want tuh malign and what not let them carry on....
True.
 

Trinibaje

IMIX ATTORNEY GENERAL
Bake n Shark said:
Facking Cubans :devil
that would be the rednecks in broward.. the cubans at the herald did a nice article in the sunday paper... so take that comment back :devil
 

Nekeisha2

Registered User
Bake n Shark said:
Trinidad Kicks Off Carnival Extravaganza

By PAISLEY DODDS
The Associated Press
Monday, February 7, 2005; 3:19 PM

PORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad - Masqueraders covered themselves in mud and motor oil Monday to start Carnival, swaggering through the streets to pounding beats and having one last dirty dance before showering and slipping into jeweled bikinis and feathered headdresses.

Tens of thousands of people spilled into the streets for J'Ouvert, which means opening, a tradition where revelers douse themselves in mud and oil before dawn to honor black masqueraders who fought against British soldiers in 1881 to hold their Carnival. Even during Carnival's tamer days more than a century ago, some considered the festivities lewd.

"The only thing bad about Carnival is the end of Carnival!" said Glenn Rollins, 43, with bloodshot eyes and a wide smile.

Fueled by concoctions of rum, coffee and tobacco, men donned dresses and women painted on beards Monday as they gyrated behind vibrating speakers, flicking streams of mud, oil and paint at observers. Some barely dressed at all, their bodies caked in dirt, as they grabbed bystanders from the shadows and flung them into a sweaty sea of bodies.

Although Caribbean revelers wear more clothes than Carnival dancers in Rio de Janiero, the dances are less choreographed and more raucous than the ones in Brazil.

Trinidad's Carnival reaches its climax Tuesday when all the masquerade bands - more than 50 this year - strut across the Queen's Park Savannah in their glittering costumes. The bands put on part of their fancy costumes for pre-parades across the city on Monday.

Carnival was introduced to Trinidad by French immigrants in the 1700s. Before Ash Wednesday and Lent, plantation owners doused themselves in molasses and dressed up as slaves. The slaves - celebrating the end of the harvest - in turn dressed up to parody their masters.

Today, the celebrations have become the Caribbean's biggest and most lavish bash, drawing more than 1 million people from the region and Diaspora - almost doubling the Caribbean nation's population of 1.3 million - and generating about $1 billion in business.

"Every year the festivities just get better," said Kamel Hamid, 52, who came from Toronto. "But it has been 30 years since I last saw J'Ouvert."

Monday's festivities began with a competition for Carnival king and queen, summoning masqueraders disguised as fire-breathing dragons, glittery grim reapers and a huge translucent butterfly. The masqueraders were followed by the crowning of a Calypso monarch.

Band leaders attached intricate and heavy costumes - some as wide as a large tree canopy and as high as 30 feet - for the competition that began on Dimanche Gras, or Carnival Sunday, and faded into the darkness and another day as Monday rolled around.

"Sleep? No, I've barely slept, but I don't feel so bad," said Johanna Schmidt, 23, from Berlin, clasping a dented can of energy drink.

Curtis Eustace was crowned king for his towering costume of an orange and black dragon, adorned by golden skulls on its expansive sparkling appendages. Pamela Gordon was crowned queen for her giant translucent butterfly that was as big as a dump truck.

One masquerader wore a sparkling grim reaper-like figure attached to his body that towered over his head and shot out white firecrackers. Another costume was a lanky white vulture with bulging eyes, an expansive purple and red wingspan and a troupe of fire-blowing devil dancers.

Other female costumes included a gargantuan orange and gold Indian princess and a Carmen Miranda-like costume laden with fruit and giant fake parrots lifting the masquerader's skirt.

One of the celebration's oldest staples has been the Calypso competition. Calypso, with its pulsating beats and political satire, is rooted in African traditions of improvised songs.

This year's artists included well-known Calypso stars such as Chalkdust, who was crowned this year's Calypso monarch for his song "Ah doh Rhyme." The song is about how anger over Trinidad's political corruption and exploited gas and oil reserves keeps him from rhyming.

"The poetry of Calypsonians is known across the world," said Winston Smith, 23, of Brooklyn, N.Y. "It doesn't matter if you're from the Caribbean or American. What matters is that these people are talking about things politicians don't have the guts to tackle."
very nice :cool:
 

Bake n Shark

Gangsta Boogie
Trinibaje said:
that would be the rednecks in broward.. the cubans at the herald did a nice article in the sunday paper... so take that comment back :devil
My bad...

damn cuban rednecks in Broward :devil
 
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