Island Creole or Dialect

cease10

Registered User
I am totally shocked as to how onpoint Wikipedia is....I mean they even have deh definitions of our badwords in there :rofl

Virgin Islands Dialect

Phrases

* Wha you sayin – what's up
* Hail up – hi, hello
* Ya – here (St. Croix)
* Heh – here (St. Thomas, St. John, BVI)
* Cyan – cannot
* Safe – alright, or okay
* Wha pa' he/she/you deh? – Where is/are he/she/you?
* Whe' he/she/you deh? – Where is/are he/she/you?
* Me'en know – I don't know
* Deh deh – It is here/It is there (St. Croix)
* He/she ain deh deh – He/she isn't there (St. Croix)
* I/he/she gone to come back – I/he/she left and am/is returning shortly
* I/he/she deh ya – I/he/she am/is here (St. Croix)
* Come ya – come here (St. Croix)
* Come heh – come here (St. Thomas, St. John, BVI)
* I's – I am
* You's – you are
* Ayo – you all
* Deh – there
* Dem – them (can also be added at the end of any noun to make it plural, as in "de hass dem")
* Dat – that
* Dah – that
* Ting – thing
* Tek – take
* Mek – make
* Wha – what
* Geh – get, or have
* Geh from ya – go away (St. Croix)
* Geh from heh – go away (St. Thomas, St. John, BVI)
* Nah – no
* Ih – it, as in "ih real hot outside" (it is really hot outside)
* Ah – of, as in "I geh two ah dem" (I have two of them)
* Ah nex – another, as in "I geh ah nex one" (I have another one)
* Vex – upset (vex is also an English word, but it is used much more often in Virgin Islands Creole than in standard English)
* Tief – to steal
* Jook/Chook – to stab or poke
* Schupid – stupid
* Bus' off – to leave
* Cahn – marijuana
* Bun – to smoke, usually refers to smoking marijuana
* Wuk up – to dance (usually specific to calypso or soca music)
* Breeding – the state of being pregnant
* Breed – to impregnate
* Dealin – when a couple is not yet officially dating, but are on their way to be; the equivalent to the stateside phrase "talking"
* Mahgah/Meeguh – meager, extremely skinny
* All ah we – all of us
* Cheese and bread – a remark of surprise
* Eh eh – a remark of surprise
* Mehson – literally "my son," commonly used at the beginning or ends of sentences, akin to the American English slang use of "oh, man!"
* Deh man – use is similar to "mehson."
* Yuh chek? – asked at the end of a sentence, akin to saying "you know?"
* Chek you latah – see you later
* Uh huh pampa leh-leh – a remark made by school children when another student has gotten in trouble
* Coo-coo – the act of defecation, or feces (commonly said by children)
* Rample – to mess up, as in "Don' rample up de bed I mek up, mehson!"
* Quelbe – official music of the Virgin Islands
* Quadrille – native dance of the Virgin Islands
* Bahn ya – literally "born here," a commonly used phrase in Virgin Islands society, used by some to determine whether someone is or is not a "native Virgin Islander." For example, someone might say "my parents are from Antigua, but I'm a Virgin Islander, because I bahn ya!"
* Bam! – said after someone has made a stupid joke. Its use is not as common in recent years. (St. Croix)
* Blam! – see Bam!
* Scoboops/Scroboops – verbal embarassment (from an authoritative figure)
* Wraut up – cursed out
* Lyah – liar
* Ah good! – serves you right (St. Croix)
* Ihs good! – serves you right (St. Thomas)
* Foh true? – you serious?
* You sick de man? – are you crazy?
* Chek yah – come here,
* Watch yah! – look at this. Term of endearment used before, after, or during an argument. (St. Croix)
* Ignohrant – one who gets "vex" quick.
* Gahn een – someone who is crazy; lost their mind.
* Lime/Limin – location of a party or hangout; hanging out.
* Pickin Whelks – wearing pants with pant legs that are obviously too short.
* Disgustin – being extremely playful; harrassing
 

cease10

Registered User
VI Badwords

these are too funny, but they are totally onpoint :rofl

Profane words

* Antiman – a gay person
* Bud/charlie/wood – penis
* Skin-back charlie – circumcised penis
* Pum pum/tun tun/pokey – vagina
* Rass – ass
* Ram – euphemism for rass, not as vulgar
* Sket/skettel – a sexually promiscuous woman
* Pump – to masturbate
* Boom – having an erection
* Jam – to gyrate on, or dance closely to
* Muddascunt – literally the Virgin Islands creole pronunciation of "mother's cunt," its use is similar to "motherfucker."
* Bull – to engage in sexual intercourse
* Bun rice – to pick one's underwear out from between one's buttocks
 
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cease10

Registered User
VI Nouns

Nouns

* Chil'ren – children
* Mudda – mother
* Fadda – father
* Nene – godmother
* Pepe – godfather
* Gongolo – millipede
* Gyul/gyal – girl
* Pussman – a male player
* Yankee – a person from the United States
* Garot/Gasso - an islander originally from an Eastern Caribbean island not including the U.S. and British Virgin Islands
* Babylon - the United States, the police, or the government
* Lahlah – idle gossip
* Melee – malicious gossip
* Licks – spanking (a form of child discipline)
* Donkey years – many years
* Hass – horse (St. Croix)
* Cyar – car (St. Croix)
* Banah – a person's behind
* Jumbie – an evil spirit
* Mocko Jumbie or Moko Jumbie – a popular carnival figure who is a masked, costumed person on stilts who scares away evil spirits
* Pardna – a friend, companion or close associate
* Quat – a quarter
* Bubbla – water fountain
* Tahmon – tamarind (St. Thomas)
* Tambrahn – tamarind (St. Croix)
* Jam – a party
* Grave yahd – the cemetery
 

cease10

Registered User
Antiguan guide

This is to help deciphering the Antiguans....

Pronunciation

Many non-Antiguans find that Antiguans drag their words. Which is probably true. Words are expressively and rawly pronounced. Antiguan Dialect is pronounced very similarly to Jamaican. This has lead some to surmise that the slaves of these countries came from the same place in Africa. Below are a few ways in which some language blends are fused or changed completely.

* TR as in 'Truck' is pronounced CH thus: 'Chuck.'
* DR as in 'Dress' is pronounced J thus: 'Jess'
* TH as in 'Them' is pronounced D thus: 'Dem'
* Th as in 'Think' is pronounced T thus: 'Tink'
* ...WN as in 'Down' is pronounced NG thus: 'Dong'
* Probably due to the Spanish influence, V is sometimes pronounced like a B. eg. 'Vex' is pronounced 'Bex'.
* Sometimes an ending T is left off and words such as 'Best' sound like 'Bess'. Expect sounds like 'Expeck'. And 'Left' sounds like 'Leff'.
 

cease10

Registered User
Antiguan Examples

Practical examples

1.

* English: "I'm going to work."
* Dialect: "Me a go a wuk."

2.

* English: "It tastes good."
* Dialect: "Eh bang good."

3.

* English: "I don't like it."
* Dialect: "Me nah lub um."

4.

* English: "Girl, where are you going?"
* Dialect: "Gyal, weh you ah go?"

5.

* English: "I'll see you later."
* Dialect: "Me will check you lata."

6.

* English: "I didn't want to see her."
* Dialect: "Me nah min wah fu see she."

7.

* English: "It is my own."
* Dialect: "Ah fu me own."

8.

* English: "Don't tell us what to do."
* Dialect: "Nah tell arwe wah fu do."

9.

* English: "You were gone too long."
* Dialect: "You min gawn too lang."

10.

* English: "Good morning, how are things?"
* Dialect: "Marning, How tings?"

11.

* English: "I'm doing well."
* Dialect: "Me yah." (Literally "I am here" menaing i'm still alive so i'm good.)
 

LolaMs

Spitfire
This is to help deciphering the Antiguans....

Pronunciation

Many non-Antiguans find that Antiguans drag their words. Which is probably true. Words are expressively and rawly pronounced. Antiguan Dialect is pronounced very similarly to Jamaican. This has lead some to surmise that the slaves of these countries came from the same place in Africa. Below are a few ways in which some language blends are fused or changed completely.

* TR as in 'Truck' is pronounced CH thus: 'Chuck.'
* DR as in 'Dress' is pronounced J thus: 'Jess'
* TH as in 'Them' is pronounced D thus: 'Dem'
* Th as in 'Think' is pronounced T thus: 'Tink'
* ...WN as in 'Down' is pronounced NG thus: 'Dong'
* Probably due to the Spanish influence, V is sometimes pronounced like a B. eg. 'Vex' is pronounced 'Bex'.
* Sometimes an ending T is left off and words such as 'Best' sound like 'Bess'. Expect sounds like 'Expeck'. And 'Left' sounds like 'Leff'.

anybady arksyoo fuh help fuh anybady???:butcher:
 

.

L O S T
i posted up on the jamaican article a while back
again it was mostly on point......




Giveaway features include the characteristic pronunciation of the diphthong in words like "cow", which is more closed and rounded than in Standard British or American English; the pronunciation of the "but" vowel (again, more closed than the SB or AE version, though not as closed as in the Creole); semi-rhoticity, i.e. the dropping of the "-r" in words like "water" (at the end of unstressed syllables) and "market" (before a consonant); but not in words like "car" or "dare" (stressed syllables at the end of the word). Merger of the diphthongs in "fair" and "fear" takes place both in Jamaican Standard and Jamaican Creole, resulting in those two words (and many others, like "bear" and "beer") becoming homophones. (Standard speakers typically pronounce both closer to "air", while Creole speakers render them as "ear"). The short "a" sound (man, hat) is very open, similar to its Irish or Scottish versions.
 

cease10

Registered User
hexcyoos wheh inna fooyoo rawsoal mind you ever fix up di idea we give a rat battam who di ass andarstand we?? :dntknw:
head back to wikipedia to decipher this ting :read.......ok I think I got it now


My reply:

U nah lub um."
"Ah fu me own."
"Nah tell me wah fu do."
:grin:
 
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