Can you Feel the Beat?

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
SMH it isn't more "universal" :kicks what you meant to say was more popular. But even then that's wrong because Reggaeton has emerged as the biggest genre out of the Caribbean. They are moving more units, going on actual world tours and have radio support. They have the numbers.
play soca and dancehall to show some new friends Caribbean music.the moment I played dancehall dem bugas bawl out reggaeton lmao
 
I am not trying to bash anyone or nation but can somebody besides a Vincy or a trini explain to me this so called Vincy ragga soca beat? That I think is non existent to my ears.
 

tikreyol

Got Kompa?
play soca and dancehall to show some new friends Caribbean music.the moment I played dancehall dem bugas bawl out reggaeton lmao
From what I've heard Reggaeton artists are even making English versions that are playing on the Pop stations :kicks They truly won't need Dancehall artists anymore.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cYro643OEXY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Carib2

Registered User
I am not trying to bash anyone or nation but can somebody besides a Vincy or a trini explain to me this so called Vincy ragga soca beat? That I think is non existent to my ears.
Um, no because its basically non existent lets be honest....
 
Um, no because its basically non existent lets be honest....
i mean in no way i dissing Vincies, but i hear the jab beat from Grenada, the bouyon beat from Dominica, the benna beat from Antigua and the tuk beat from Barbados but i cannot pinpoint this so called Ragga Soca beat that many Vincies claim that they started, it just sounds like other soca easily coming out of Trinidad.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Is this Soca? Sound kinda Dancehallish.
Apparently this is the united theme for the Caribbean at the Rio Olympics (based on Digicel).
Just wished it was a pure Dancehall track which would be more representative of the Caribbean.

<iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/266701861&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false&visual=true"></iframe>
I believe that Machel talks about this track during this interview and describes it as a fusion of Soca and Dancehall.

Machel Montano talks Soca Movement, Mas Band, New Projects & More w/ DJ Young Chow!
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/z3lA6v8XgTI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Carib2

Registered User
i mean in no way i dissing Vincies, but i hear the jab beat from Grenada, the bouyon beat from Dominica, the benna beat from Antigua and the tuk beat from Barbados but i cannot pinpoint this so called Ragga Soca beat that many Vincies claim that they started, it just sounds like other soca easily coming out of Trinidad.

I guess some of the tunes have horn or something playing. I dunno ask VINCYPOWA lol...
 

Mr_Crafty

New member
No! I don't consider anything that interpolates the actual lyrics of a song from another genre to be authentic anything! Did you listen to the album he put out? Most of that stuff sounded like an attempt to fuse RnB with Soca. This is not to take away from KL or his success but purely from a sound standpoint. Would you consider most of Sanchez' songs to be authentically Caribbean because of the tracks they were on despite being adaptations? I wouldn't (JMHO). The others you mentioned I can easily agree to.

Nahman this b.s here, nah I haffo go VP pon this one, this is some traumatized trini bullsh*t.

You trinis really grudge KL one likkle international hit that much aryo come up with a b.s criteria as to whats " authentic caribbean music" and what isn't? I mean since we just pulling stuff out we ass to make up a criteria for what's authentic caribbean music this trash below wey teef from Cyndi Lauper shouldn't be considered authentic caribbean music neither, nah true?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1m9FNP25vM0

:rolleyes: I mean nothing interesting about this chune that sets it apart from any other garbage, boring jump n wave song besides the sweet melodies taken from the Cyndi Lauper. But as usual is trinis do it so its ok, perfect representative of "authentic c'bean".

Keep it real the bs u chatting is due to the fact some of you mofos bitter as f*ck that song come outta likkle vincy and not outtra trini. If it been a trini song, none of this bs woulda been seeping outta your mouth.

On to the next one.

Now as for the two aids infested bullaman dem who pretending dey don't know what ragga soca is, lemme re-educate aryo cah like bullin does f*ck up ppl brain n ge dem short memory.

While you two HIV carrying, shit-pokey nyamming, tutu tolo dullards were whining on man to that god awful jump n wave soca, this is the type of music vincy nikkaz was making from since the early 2000's













^^wait wait waiz da? pop mixed wid soca in 2009?? but i thought trinis invented island pop in the 2010's?

So basically ragga soca is what u homos started calling groovy soca and 'island pop' in the 2010's. You've been schooled

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5pI8wTbYvWk

Now have a nice day, da last one dey dem wouldn't allow me fo embed buh it bad no f*ck

Peace. :lazy:
 
Crafty, you sound very emotional. I asked someone who is not a Vincy to explain to me what is this so called ragga beat. Only people I hear going on with this nonsense are Vincies who somehow use this as a patriotic chant for their music. The facts are no major Caribbean musical art form ever came out of St Vincent to my knowledge.

This ragga music that y'all claiming as authentic Vincy music sounds like any slow soca music out of any island. I don't get the big whoop but that's just me.
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
The only track that Mr Crafty posted in post #28 above that sounds like a genuine Ragga Soca track is Nookie by Jamesy P.

All the other tracks that he posted sound like regular soca tracks at a "groovy" tempo or what Trinis accurately refer to as Groovy Soca.

The last track Mr Crafty posted has an EDM Soca feel to it but there are similar EDM & Soca fusion tracks that came out from T&T artists almost 15 years before that one. Here is one of many.

Machel Montano & Xtatik - Come Dig It - Soca Music Video (1995)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mlDoyO_9tKc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Btw EDM Soca is the updated term for Island Pop.

When Soca was first invented by Lord Shorty in the early 1970's the music was originally mostly at a Groovy Soca pace but the term Groovy Soca was not coined until 2005.
Here is a typical groovy pace soca tune from the 1970's.

Kalyan - What We Gonna Do Next (1977)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1nQ2f8j4PfE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
The only track that Mr Crafty posted in post #28 above that sounds like a genuine Ragga Soca track is Nookie by Jamesy P.

All the other tracks that he posted sound like regular soca tracks at a "groovy" tempo or what Trinis accurately refer to as Groovy Soca.

The last track Mr Crafty posted has an EDM Soca feel to it but there are similar EDM & Soca fusion tracks that came out from T&T artists almost 15 years before that one. Here is one of many.

Machel Montano & Xtatik - Come Dig It - Soca Music Video (1995)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mlDoyO_9tKc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Btw EDM Soca is the updated term for Island Pop.

When Soca was first invented by Lord Shorty in the early 1970's the music was originally mostly at a Groovy Soca pace but the term Groovy Soca was not coined until 2005.
Here is a typical groovy pace soca tune from the 1970's.

Kalyan - What We Gonna Do Next (1977)
<iframe width="650" height="400" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1nQ2f8j4PfE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
All tracks posted by crafty are authentic vincy raggasoca we dont need a trini to tell us what our music is

What you all call groovy soca 2005 to now are an attempt at how to play our vincy ragga soca
if you notice you have not post any song similar in style to the songs posted by crafty.

The first music your all call island pop was a copy of troots and ice captivate
not that shit by michelle
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Here is an early Groovy Soca from 1990 but the music video for it was recorded in 1991.

Taxi – Frenchman (Official Video / 1990/91)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vkPdC1VDkLE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And here is a proper early Ragga Soca hit from 1993. A collaboration of artists and musicians between T&T and Jamaica is what gave popularity to this soca sub-genre started in the late 1980's to early 1990's when the fusing of Dancehall/Raggamuffin music from Jamaica with Soca music from T&T became a popular trend.

Byron Lee & The Dragonaires - Dancehall Soca (Music Video / 1993)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iz7mBEYwxWk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And here is another early Island Pop aka EDM Soca from 1993.

Wayne T & Silky Slim - Doye Doye (1993)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jxGRJNo9gTY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

The harsh reality is that the Vincies have done nothing innovative first where soca music is concerned.
There are always earlier soca recordings to put a big question mark to all the Vincy soca innovation claims.

As I stated before Soca music started out at a Groovy pace when it was invented by Lord Shorty in the early 1970's. Just listen to the words of this trademark soca hit below from Lord Shorty released in 1974 in which he sings about changing the accent of Carnival to a groovy groovy bacchanal.

Lord Shorty - Endless Vibrations (1974)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2OlsGIN-lLM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
• Accompanied by Art De Coteau Orchestra
• Brass section arranged by Ed Watson / Rhythm section arranged by Garfield Blackman


Words for Endless Vibrations (1974)
Composed by Lord Shorty


(Hey!)
(Hit the horns!)
(Sexy!)


Change the accent of Carnival
To a groovy, groovy Bacchanal.
Wailing, expressing – de old feeling do needs changing.
Wake up, people, examine your minds –
Get with it, get with it, the change of the times.
It’s a new generation, endless vibrations
– right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Hit the horns!)

Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!
(Groovy)


Change your musical structure, make it super sweeter.
J’ouvert morning, when we wailing, bring on this funky feeling.
Uptight, uptight, feeling so fine
– come on, come on, come on, let the music take your mind.
Get with the feeling, it’s so exciting
– right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Do it horns!)

Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!
(Right on)


A new musical expression to ease today’s frustration.
Move it, come on, groove it.
Endlessly let me feel it.
Come on, people, check out de scene.
Take a side, take a side, de music is mean.
Can you dig it, brudduh? Get it all together?
Right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Hit the horns!)
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!


Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!

Fêtin’ Carnival Sunday night, don’t dig no blues, don’t dig no fight.
Eh, we winin’, lord we prancin’.
Rock your baby, rock your baby, kungfu fightin’.
Music so bad, fuss your hip,
Rock your boat, rock your boat, rock your ship.
It’s really outta sight, makes you feel like dynamite
– right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Hit me horns!)

Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!
(Right on)

END

Soca music was groovy from its birth and for most of the 1970's, the music recordings don't lie but people do. Soca music was generally sped-up in the 1980's to create Jam & Wine Soca and then it was generally sped-up even more in the 1990's to create Jump & Wave Soca. But lets keep in mind that while jump & wave soca was popularly being made for the road during the 1990's, ragga soca and slower pace groovy soca was also being made during that same period for the fetes and parties. In the 2000's jump & wave soca was rebranded Power Soca while the slower original pace soca was rebranded Groovy Soca.
The music evidence proves that Groovy Soca despite being branded as such in the 2000's was nothing new.

Black Stalin summarizes it well in this 1978 song.

Black Stalin - De Same Old Ting (1978)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Fkas7MpxxdU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
• Arranged by Earl Rodney
 

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
Here is an early Groovy Soca from 1990 but the music video for it was recorded in 1991.

Taxi – Frenchman (Official Video / 1990/91)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vkPdC1VDkLE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And here is a proper early Ragga Soca hit from 1993. A collaboration of artists between T&T and Jamaica is what gave popularity to this soca sub-genre that started in the late 1980's to early 1990's when the fusing of Dancehall/Raggamuffin music from Jamaica with Soca music from T&T became a popular trend.

Byron Lee & The Dragonaires - Dancehall Soca (Music Video / 1993)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/iz7mBEYwxWk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

And here is another early Island Pop aka EDM Soca from 1993.

Wayne T & Silky Slim - Doye Doye (1993)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jxGRJNo9gTY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

The harsh reality is that the Vincies have done nothing first or original where soca music is concern.
There are always earlier soca recordings to put a big question mark to all the Vincy soca innovation claims.

As I stated before Soca music started out at a Groovy pace when it was invented by Lord Shorty in the early 1970's. Just listen to the words of this trademark soca hit from Lord Shorty released in 1974 in which he sings about changing the accent of Carnival to a groovy groovy bacchanal.
Soca music was groovy from its birth and for most of the 1970's, the recordings don't lie but people do.

Lord Shorty - Endless Vibrations (1974)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2OlsGIN-lLM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
• Accompanied by Art De Coteau Orchestra
• Brass section arranged by Ed Watson / Rhythm section arranged by Garfield Blackman


Words for Endless Vibrations (1974)
Composed by Lord Shorty


(Hey!)
(Hit the horns!)
(Sexy!)


Change the accent of Carnival
To a groovy, groovy Bacchanal.
Wailing, expressing – de old feeling do needs changing.
Wake up, people, examine your minds –
Get with it, get with it, the change of the times.
It’s a new generation, endless vibrations
– right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Hit the horns!)

Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!
(Groovy)


Change your musical structure, make it super sweeter.
J’ouvert morning, when we wailing, bring on this funky feeling.
Uptight, uptight, feeling so fine
– come on, come on, come on, let the music take your mind.
Get with the feeling, it’s so exciting
– right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Do it horns!)

Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!
(Right on)


A new musical expression to ease today’s frustration.
Move it, come on, groove it.
Endlessly let me feel it.
Come on, people, check out de scene.
Take a side, take a side, de music is mean.
Can you dig it, brudduh? Get it all together?
Right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Hit the horns!)
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!


Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!

Fêtin’ Carnival Sunday night, don’t dig no blues, don’t dig no fight.
Eh, we winin’, lord we prancin’.
Rock your baby, rock your baby, kungfu fightin’.
Music so bad, fuss your hip,
Rock your boat, rock your boat, rock your ship.
It’s really outta sight, makes you feel like dynamite
– right on, right on, right on, right on!

Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay (Hey!)
Lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay lay – (Hit me horns!)

Come baby, oh baby, jump with me.
Come baby, oh baby, romp with me.
Wine! It’s Carnival grine! Make Bacchanal!
(Right on)

END
None of your music from above song anything like what grafty posted


groovy is a slang back in the day

why are you highlighting groovy groovy Bacchanal because it sure does not equal groovy soca


As I said before trini groovy soca is an attempt at vincy ragga soca the evidence to prove it

island pop is a copy at captivate who you a try trick


that taxi man song you slip in you trinis want to play slick trying to say he create groovy soca lmao

ALways trying to tief vincy music dem music from d 90´s aint song like what grafty posted if i want i could post music from 70 80 90 as well

The point i am making the music call groovy soca from trini from 2005 up is an attempt to emulate KL Thats a fact

bunch a tiefs
 

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
Putting words together and sugar coating it means nuthing

Your music you calling groovy soca aint sound nuting from back den its a cheap imitation of vincy ragga soca thats a fact thats why you cant post no groovy soca from 2005 on Fact

that Byron Lee & The Dragonaires - Dancehall Soca song you posted prove what again sugar coating as usual

beckette coined dancehall soca but you leave this out didnt you cause as usual you a liar

here is the original dancehall soca
from the 80s

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SjBi0hv_PE8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


LOL
 

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
The slickness about these type a trinis they trying to say soca start out groovy like it suppose to mean someting to educated people

soca started out soca


they they slip in groovy soca invented in 2005 and is a subgenre of soca and rnb
and giving taxi the credit that why said dat bastard above playing slick by adding the taxi video

vincy ragga soca have different flavors soca fused with rnb is one

as i said you could fool idiots but educated people aint buying that

GROOVY SOCA IS A COPY OF VINCY RAGGA SOCA THATS A FACT
 

Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Groovy Soca was defined by the International Soca Monarch people who introduced the term in 2005 as Soca music recorded at a 135 Beats Per Minute (BMP) speed or less. This means that 90% plus of the original early soca recordings from the 1970's fall into the Groovy Soca category. Even a 10 year old can understand this.

Here are two more early Groovy Soca tracks from 1975 produced by Lord Shorty for Ella Andall.

Ella Andall - Second Fiddle (1975)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xK_zlZuy3GM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Music by Lord Shorty's Vibrations International

Ella Andall - Hello Africa (1975)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/u2L0zQo_V-g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Music by Lord Shorty's Vibrations International
 

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
Groovy Soca was defined by the International Soca Monarch people who introduced the term in 2005 as Soca music recorded at a 135 Beats Per Minute (BMP) speed or less. This means that 90% plus of the original early soca recordings from the 1970's fall into the Groovy Soca category. Even a 10 year old can understand this.

Here are two more early Groovy Soca tracks from 1975 produced by Lord Shorty for Ella Andall.

Ella Andall - Second Fiddle (1975)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xK_zlZuy3GM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Music by Lord Shorty's Vibrations International

Ella Andall - Hello Africa (1975)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/u2L0zQo_V-g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Music by Lord Shorty's Vibrations International

In other word you cant post any music from the 2000 because its trying to imitate vincy music




POPSO
Pop goes soca
Whatever you choose to call it, the soca-pop-R&B hybrid popularised abroad by Kevin Lyttle, Rupee, and KMC shows soca adapting to both international listening tastes and market -ing plans. But at home in Trinidad, Destra Garcia’s version of “groovy soca” is the buouyant sound of Carnival today
At any given moment in Trinidad and Tobago’s musical history, there’s a genre being put forward as the sound most likely to do for the country what reggae has done for Jamaica. Soca, rapso, and ragga soca have held this position at various times — and ragga soca is still in the running — but the “money sound” these days is indisputably that style variously known as groovy soca, crossover soca, or — if you’re a VP Records marketing executive — “popso”.
If you happened to turn on your radio during the 2001 Carnival season, you’d have been sure to hear a song called “Turn Me On” by a little-known Vincentian crooner named Kevin Lyttle. Mid-tempo, easy on the ears, perhaps a little treacly — you didn’t necessarily have to like “Turn Me On” to understand its widespread appeal, and as the weather warmed up in other parts of the globe it became a summer hit in other markets as well. Then Atlantic Records offered Lyttle a recording contract. Life-size cutouts of the guy begin appearing in record stores in North America, and a music video directed by Little X was in rotation on MTV and elsewhere. The sub-genre known as “popso” was born.
VP Records, coiner of the rather awkward term, describes it in their literature as “the latest hybrid sound from the Caribbean . . . a blend of contemporary R&B, hip-hop and dancehall reggae styles filtered through today’s cutting edge soca artists and producers”. That’s marketing-speak, but it’s also a fairly accurate description of the sound popularised worldwide by Lyttle, as well as Rupee from Barbados and Trinidadian KMC in his “Soul on Fire” mode. Yet mid-tempo rhythms and crooning vocals are hardly a new strain in calypso and soca — in fact, one of the tracks chosen for VP’s 2005 Popso Jamz compilation is Denise Belfon and Ghetto Flex’s “Wine and Bend Over”, which dates from way back in 2003, when it was categorised as a ragga soca number.
A crossover sound is, by definition, a natural target for criticism, destined to get up the backs of hardcore fans of the various ingredient genres. And Trinidadian artists have in fact been known to lose or let go of record deals allegedly for refusing to cross over — to alter their sound to the extent that the contracting parties wished.
Not surprisingly, “popso” has inspired strong feelings among West Indians. “Stop messing around with an already established art form. To the many where this artform is a part of their culture itz [sic] a slap in the face,” says one comment at the de cooler: soca news website. “Kudos to VP Records . . .” says another, “for finally owning up to what sell-outs they are.” “Don’t we have this already? by ‘Groovy Soca’, ” goes a third. “Popso — can’t they be more creative and use what T&T already call it and stop messing around with it. Let’s get a petition going to have it remain as Groovy Soca.”
But, like it or not, pop calypso is having its moment in the sun. Of the foreign recording contracts handed out lately, all have gone to practitioners of the smooth new vibe. And only two of them so far — Sugar Daddy, who had a European hit with “Sweet Soca Music”, and KMC with “Soul on Fire” — have been from Trinidad and Tobago. Artists like Dawg-e-Slaughter have lowered the tempo and jumped on the “popso” bandwagon, and natural crooners like Edwin Yearwood and Shurwayne Winchester and groups like Da Bhann probably feel like they’ve found a home. With its innocuous themes of love and good times, pop calypso is also being positioned as the anti-dancehall sound — it’s unlikely you’re going to find a “popso” artist barred from performing on account of homophobic lyrics or inciting violence.
But there’s more than a single strain of pop calypso. While several Trinidadian artists have gone the route of the Atlantic/VP version of “popso”, Destra Garcia, over the last several years, has been forging her own crossover style. On 2003’s “Carnival” she hijacked a Cyndi Lauper melody and turned it into a huge hit which, two years later, was still setting Carnival fetes alight (and was adopted by the tourist authority for their Carnival marketing campaign). She followed in 2004 with two equally catchy numbers, “Up In the Air” and “Bonnie and Clyde”, as well as a popular duet with Shurwayne Winchester called “Come Beta”. “Bonnie and Clyde” would go on to be the theme song for an advertisement for Malibu Rum.
In 2005, she released her second album, Laventille, an ambitious tribute to her home community, and while it didn’t spawn anything on the level of her three previous hits, Destra had already arrived at a point in her career where her place on the Carnival circuit is practically assured. Today she’s known as both a solo artist and the lead vocalist for the band Atlantik (which she joined after a brief period on her own, after leaving Roy Cape All Stars, singing lead on hits like “Tremble It”), and she’s in high demand on the international Carnival circuit.
On stage, Destra is perky and girlish, a Trinidadian version of an American pop princess. While others writhe and gyrate, she leaps and kicks her feet in the air; unlike the queens of Jamaican dancehall — or her compatriot Denise Belfon — her stage act is G-rated, but still just sexy enough for her to maintain credibility on the Carnival scene. Her songs are buoyant and transcendental in a pop music kind of way, inspiring a sort of airborne abandon — her 2005 single, in fact, was entitled “Fly”.
In her short career, Destra has added three pop anthems to the catalogue: no mean achievement in the music business, and especially in the context of Carnival, which each year sees scores of “hits” which months later nobody has any recollection of ever having heard. Destra’s is the kind of sound that a young person, living at the crossroads of cultures and technologies that is Trinidad and Tobago today, is likely to produce, and the breeziness of her music may well act as an antidote to the hard edge which often characterises life not only in Trinidad and Tobago, but in many other corners of the globe.
Destra won the Road March title in 2003 at the Labour Day Carnival in Brooklyn, but she’s yet to win either the Road March or Soca Monarch title in her native land (though she’s come close). In interviews, however, she’s been philosophical. “It’s not about that,” Destra says. “It’s never about that. It’s all about the music. You remember ‘Bonnie and Clyde’? You remember ‘It’s Carnival’? That’s right. It’s all about the music. The music is memorable.”
Names to watch
Shurwayne Winchester Road March is no easy title to win, certainly not two years in a row. Tobago-born Shurwayne’s “The Band Coming” (2004) combined strong melodies with his trademark croon to make a massive hit. His clean-cut good looks didn’t hurt. In 2005 he won the crown again with “Dead or Alive” (2005), a tribute to revellers’ sheer determination to enjoy Carnival at all costs. Listen: “Take Your Time”, “Splash” (both 2002), “Get Out of my Dreams” (2004). Also lent his vocals to Destra Garcia’s crowd-pleasing soca-chutney crossover hit “Come Beta” (2004).
KES the Band Kees Dieffenthaller is a veteran of Trinidad’s rock scene, but he’s best known as former frontman for soca outfit Imij & Co., pairing up with Michelle Xavier on numbers like “Hypnotise”, “One Day”, and “The Way”. In 2004, along with brothers Hans (drums), Jon (guitar), and kindred spirit Riad Boochoon (bass), he broke away to launch KES with a fusion of soca and rock sounds. “When we’re outside playing our music, we realise how special and unique we are to be Trinbagonians.”
Michelle Sylvester 2005’s International Soca Queen is best known for her soulful R&B vocals and hip-hop rhythms, combined to good effect in her hit “Sleeping in Your Bed” — a song about a tit-for-tat tryst and its consequences. For seven years Sylvester honed her sound performing with brass bands like Horyzon and Sound Revelation. Now enjoying a solo career, she’s targeted new audiences and caught the attention of a growing fan base.


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Socapro

Repect Our Soca Pioneers
Also Trini soca artists were fusing R&B with Soca from since the early days of soca in the 1970's.

I already posted a groovy soca track with R&B elements in post #31 above from Kalyan but here it is again for those who may have missed it.

Kalyan - What We Gonna Do Next (1977)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1nQ2f8j4PfE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Produced & Arranged by Tony Silvester & Kalyan

And here is another soca track with r&b elements by King Wellington from 1977.

King Wellington - Play With It (1977)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AO7XHeEi2yk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Arranged by Pelham Goddard

And here is a romantic groovy soca by Lord Nelson with r&b elements from 1981.

Lord Nelson - Gimme Love (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-guc366SqAM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Arranged by Clive Bradley

As I already said, when Soca was first invented by Lord Shorty in the early 1970's the music was originally mostly at a Groovy Soca pace. The music recordings don't lie but desperate people trying to claim they did this or that first do when the music recordings clearly say otherwise.
 

S.A.T.O.R.E-S.A.N

ESOS WEYES
Also Trini soca artists were fusing R&B with Soca from since the early days of soca in the 1970's.

I already posted a groovy soca track with R&B elements in post #31 above from Kalyan but here it is again for those who may have missed it.

Kalyan - What We Gonna Do Next (1977)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1nQ2f8j4PfE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Produced & Arranged by Tony Silvester & Kalyan

And here is another soca track with r&b elements by King Wellington from 1977.

King Wellington - Play With It (1977)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AO7XHeEi2yk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Arranged by Pelham Goddard

And here is a romantic groovy soca by Lord Nelson with r&b elements from 1981.

Lord Nelson - Gimme Love (1981)
<iframe width="550" height="350" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-guc366SqAM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
Arranged by Clive Bradley

As I already said, when Soca was first invented by Lord Shorty in the early 1970's the music was originally mostly at a Groovy Soca pace. The music recordings don't lie but desperate people trying to claim they did this or that first do when the music recordings clearly say otherwise.
So why are you trinis trying to copy our ragga soca rebranding it as groovy

soca rnb dancehall fusion


the music you posting above is not your music today this is what you all copying

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Bx2hH2LfE0I" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>



<iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5pI8wTbYvWk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Keep on fooling yourself
 
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