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Thread: A waste of talent

  1. #1
    Spoogie
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    A waste of talent

    Najia Alavi, National Post
    Published: Thursday, July 31, 2008



    'Immigrants are less likely to find work in Canada than their Canadian-born counterparts, even if they've been educated at North American universities," reported Statistics Canada at the end of July.

    All I can say is: Tell me something I didn't already know.

    When drafting its immigration policy for Canada's knowledge-based economy, our government forgot that knowledge-based work involves people -- people working closely with other people. And most people prefer working with others who look like them, talk like them and share similar life experiences.

    So, it really doesn't matter where immigrants get their education from, or, for that matter, how much education they get. According to another StatsCan report, 51% of recent immigrants to Canada have a university degree -- twice the number of degree-holders among the Canadianborn population. Yet, the unemployment rate for recent immigrants is double that of the Canadian-born population.

    What matters to employers is whether potential employees "fit" their organizations. In other words, how they look, dress, speak and what they talk about. Employers seem to prefer "Canadian" topics, like snow and cottages, to "foreign" topics, like grandparents living in Karachi. Also, getting a job often depends on who you know; newcomers, fresh off the boat, can't even find a doctor, so how are they supposed to locate an internal referral to hidden jobs?

    A 2007 study by the Toronto group CERIS on employer attitudes and hiring practices found that employers rely heavily on informal contact and internal referral in their hiring practices. Employers don't even realize that these practices are excluding newcomers.

    Or maybe, in some cases, exclusion is the whole point of it. Employers often rationalize not hiring immigrants by citing lack of Canadian work experience, inadequate language skills or problems with transferring foreign credentials. Yet even immigrants with degrees from North American institutions can't find jobs. And besides, in a globalized economy where labour is increasingly mobile, a candidate's lack of specifically Canadian work experience should be immaterial.

    An example: An employer might tell an immigrant job seeker: "I understand that you were a chef at a high-end Dubai restaurant, but the way we prepare food is very different from the way they prepare it over there." So they offer a perfectly viable candidate a position as a dishwasher, to help them gain some "Canadian experience." As ridiculous as that sounds, those of us working with immigrants in government-funded employment agencies hear stories like this every day. We send immigrants to workshops on writing Canadian resumes, Canadian interviewing and Canadian workplace communications, and still we watch as they spend months looking for work. Some simply give up.

    The Conference Board of Canada estimates that if all immigrants were employed to the level of their qualifications and experience, up to $4.97-billion could be added to the Canadian economy annually.

    Unfortunately, age-old notions and insecurities about immigrants still exist. The perception that immigrants weigh down Canadian society persists. A change in perception is necessary if we are to fix this problem.

    Today's immigrants are dynamic, highly educated young professionals who move to Canada for its openness, freedom and respect for individual rights. Selected for entry into Canada through a system that gives them points for their education, qualifications and work experience, they rightly assume that their skills are needed in this country. Engineers, doctors, nurses, business and finance professionals are all in short supply in Canada. Yet employers continue to use archaic and exclusionary hiring practices that, in the end, keep them from hiring the most competent candidate.

    Most of the recent immigrants to Canada come from two of the fastest growing economies of the world -- China and India. It is only a matter of time before they get fed up with low-paying, mismatched jobs, and return to their home countries, where their skills and experiences will be more welcome.

    That's when the reality of Canada's labour shortage will really start to hit home.

    najiaalavi@hotmail.com - Najia Alavi is a marketing and communications co-ordinator for a nonprofit agency in Toronto helping newcomers find employment. Originally from Pakistan, Ms. Alavi immigrated to Canada two years ago.

  2. #2
    Wha de crap?! Islandtyme's Avatar Islandtyme is offline
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    ^^ Do you live in Canada. If so, how hard was it for you to get employment?

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    Registered User Dr Insane's Avatar Dr Insane is offline
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    dais shit....

  4. #4
    Spoogie
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    Quote Originally Posted by Islandtyme View Post
    ^^ Do you live in Canada. If so, how hard was it for you to get employment?
    easy

  5. #5
    Registered User marabunta is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by War means love View Post
    Most of the recent immigrants to Canada come from two of the fastest growing economies of the world -- China and India. .
    They could also be part of an Advanced Detachment softening up your grounds for an INVASION.

  6. #6
    Registered User Solidwoodsmith is offline
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    So, it really doesn't matter where immigrants get their education from, or, for that matter, how much education they get. According to another Stats Can report, 51% of recent immigrants to Canada have a university degree -- twice the number of degree-holders among the Canadian born population. Yet, the unemployment rate for recent immigrants is double that of the Canadian-born population. NS0-192 exam dumps

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    Players Play I Coach Swollen's Avatar Swollen is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solidwoodsmith View Post
    So, it really doesn't matter where immigrants get their education from, or, for that matter, how much education they get. According to another Stats Can report, 51% of recent immigrants to Canada have a university degree -- twice the number of degree-holders among the Canadian born population. Yet, the unemployment rate for recent immigrants is double that of the Canadian-born population. NS0-192 exam dumps
    Ya still a beg fuh food

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