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Thread: A Vincy In Trinidad

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    A Vincy In Trinidad

    At home in Trinidad
    Jomo Thomas
    2006/12/08


    I think about home every day, even though Trinidad has been home for the last few months. It is amazing how we take things for granted. At home, my daily exercise ends with a 30 minute swim in the sea. Since I have been here, I have not seen the sea. At home I have the luxury of looking north at the mountains, west at traffic snaking to and from Leeward or west at the majestic ocean.


    Here in Trinidad, I am bored sick looking out at flat land. This is not to say that Trinidad has no mountains. There are mountain ranges that are as imposing as ours. Even with all this sickly feelings, there is a sense of jealousy. At home, we can do with less hills and mountains and much more flat land.


    This sojourn into Trinidad has not been easy, but it is very necessary. Reading for the Certificate in Legal Education at Hugh Wooding Law School (HWLS) promises to be the final lap in a quest for personal acclamation. It guarantees more economic independence and greater intellectual freedom. The structure and organization of the program is ill- conceived and its utility is suspect at best. One student remarked that foreign trained attorneys simply contribute to the economy of Trinidad. It is true; the program cost more than $100,000. However, HWLS is a gate- keeper that foreign- trained attorneys must successfully walk past if they desire to practise in the region.
    But back to observations about Trinidad. Daily one is reminded of a line from one of Lord Valentino’s songs ‘ Trinidad is nice, Trinidad is a paradise’. The country is a true metropolis. All of the world cultures meet here. African, Chinese, European, Indian, Lebanese and Syrian blend to create a beautiful human soup matched only by callaloo. Even so there is an uneasy existence. People live together, but they are miles apart. Ever so often love, crime, politics or commerce cause all hell to break loose.


    Things are at a boil now, following the Privy Council decision that cleared the way for trial of Chief Justice, Satnarine Sharma. The issues make for real bacchanal rivaled only by carnival. An African Chief Magistrate, Sherman Mc Nichols, accused the Chief Justice, an Indian, of attempting to influence the outcome in the trial of Basdeo Panday, the former Prime Minister, who is of Indian descent. Not to be outdone, Chief Justice Sharma called Chief Magistrate Mc Nichols a liar. He further claimed that Prime Minister Patrick Manning and Director of Public Prosecution, Geoffrey Henderson, both of whom are Black, orchestrated the entire affair.


    Notice that whenever tension rises, nobody in the twin island republic is ‘Trini to the bone’. As Valentino said in another calypso classic, ‘On carnival day all ah we is one, but when Ash Wednesday comes we all go back to we race and class’. The merit and demerit of the case is buried behind the façade of politics and race. Compare this with the recent eruption of nationalist unity when the Soca Warriors made us all proud at the World Cup in Germany or Lara’s return to form with a masterly century in 77 balls.


    Piarco Airport compares favourably with the best anywhere. But look behind the splendor, there are rumours and accusations of corruption and wrongdoings. At the corruption trial of former Finance Minister Brian Quitung and five co-defendants, there were about 20 defense attorneys with more than 500 years combined legal experience.
    The rich can clearly afford justice. But as the Panday, Kwai Tung and Sharma trials show, in Trinidad the rich and powerful have less of a chance of buying justice. I wish this system on our country. Rather than pursue Ordan Graham, should we not be redoubling our efforts to root out well-placed sexploiters who rob our youth of their innocence, money launderers, drug traffickers and tax cheats? How about bringing to justice those who connived with foreigners to rip off millions at Ottley Hall?


    Street crime dramatizes another flash point for conflict and division in this oil and gas rich Republic. Trinidad is the kidnapping capital of the world. Unsolved murders have people on edge. Some homes look like prisons. Black males clog the courts. They are stars in street smarts, but dim witted at book and common sense. They bring economic burden and shame to their mostly poor parents who must find attorney fees. They choose misery and hardship as they skip an education for the fast lanes of a thug’s life.


    Dr Eric Williams once said in ‘Trinidad and Tobago money is not a problem. The problem is money.’ One short visit here and you see why. By Caribbean standards, Trinidad and Tobago is a rich country. Its budget is 50 times our own, yet poverty abounds. Vagrants, homeless, drug-crazed and insane souls litter the streets. Wanton waste, deficiencies and inefficiencies are everywhere. Drains in and around Port of Spain are blocked and stagnant for years. Whenever it rains, most of the East Coast floods. The problem certainly is not money.


    Some Trinis drive as though they have a policy for suicide insurance. They kill themselves in record numbers, but I still rate them above our mad drivers. They have roads and highways on which to fly. At home our speeding simply validates the concept of good luck. But as old people say ‘moon run til day ketch um.’


    Daily life here also brings to mind another calypso classic, Sparrow’s ‘Capitalism gone mad’. A pound of bananas cost $4, king fish is $22 and chicken back cost $5.50. We refuse to mention the cost of schoolbooks, clothing and other essentials. A good used car makes a $50,000 dent in your pocket. A 14-seater mini bus will run you $300,000 while a 24 seater goes for $600,000. As Sparrow says ‘Some say it’s nice here in Trinidad, Oh God capitalism gone mad’.


    Ah can’t wait to come home.

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    Vincy, it always takes another person from the outside to tell them they have a problem or something is really wrong but yet they still dont listen.


    Chueeps.

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    Paradise! Professor Abughani's Avatar Professor Abughani is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    At home in Trinidad
    Jomo Thomas
    2006/12/08


    I think about home every day, even though Trinidad has been home for the last few months. It is amazing how we take things for granted. At home, my daily exercise ends with a 30 minute swim in the sea. Since I have been here, I have not seen the sea. At home I have the luxury of looking north at the mountains, west at traffic snaking to and from Leeward or west at the majestic ocean.


    Here in Trinidad, I am bored sick looking out at flat land. This is not to say that Trinidad has no mountains. There are mountain ranges that are as imposing as ours. Even with all this sickly feelings, there is a sense of jealousy. At home, we can do with less hills and mountains and much more flat land.


    This sojourn into Trinidad has not been easy, but it is very necessary. Reading for the Certificate in Legal Education at Hugh Wooding Law School (HWLS) promises to be the final lap in a quest for personal acclamation. It guarantees more economic independence and greater intellectual freedom. The structure and organization of the program is ill- conceived and its utility is suspect at best. One student remarked that foreign trained attorneys simply contribute to the economy of Trinidad. It is true; the program cost more than $100,000. However, HWLS is a gate- keeper that foreign- trained attorneys must successfully walk past if they desire to practise in the region.
    But back to observations about Trinidad. Daily one is reminded of a line from one of Lord Valentino’s songs ‘ Trinidad is nice, Trinidad is a paradise’. The country is a true metropolis. All of the world cultures meet here. African, Chinese, European, Indian, Lebanese and Syrian blend to create a beautiful human soup matched only by callaloo. Even so there is an uneasy existence. People live together, but they are miles apart. Ever so often love, crime, politics or commerce cause all hell to break loose.


    Things are at a boil now, following the Privy Council decision that cleared the way for trial of Chief Justice, Satnarine Sharma. The issues make for real bacchanal rivaled only by carnival. An African Chief Magistrate, Sherman Mc Nichols, accused the Chief Justice, an Indian, of attempting to influence the outcome in the trial of Basdeo Panday, the former Prime Minister, who is of Indian descent. Not to be outdone, Chief Justice Sharma called Chief Magistrate Mc Nichols a liar. He further claimed that Prime Minister Patrick Manning and Director of Public Prosecution, Geoffrey Henderson, both of whom are Black, orchestrated the entire affair.


    Notice that whenever tension rises, nobody in the twin island republic is ‘Trini to the bone’. As Valentino said in another calypso classic, ‘On carnival day all ah we is one, but when Ash Wednesday comes we all go back to we race and class’. The merit and demerit of the case is buried behind the façade of politics and race. Compare this with the recent eruption of nationalist unity when the Soca Warriors made us all proud at the World Cup in Germany or Lara’s return to form with a masterly century in 77 balls.


    Piarco Airport compares favourably with the best anywhere. But look behind the splendor, there are rumours and accusations of corruption and wrongdoings. At the corruption trial of former Finance Minister Brian Quitung and five co-defendants, there were about 20 defense attorneys with more than 500 years combined legal experience.
    The rich can clearly afford justice. But as the Panday, Kwai Tung and Sharma trials show, in Trinidad the rich and powerful have less of a chance of buying justice. I wish this system on our country. Rather than pursue Ordan Graham, should we not be redoubling our efforts to root out well-placed sexploiters who rob our youth of their innocence, money launderers, drug traffickers and tax cheats? How about bringing to justice those who connived with foreigners to rip off millions at Ottley Hall?


    Street crime dramatizes another flash point for conflict and division in this oil and gas rich Republic. Trinidad is the kidnapping capital of the world. Unsolved murders have people on edge. Some homes look like prisons. Black males clog the courts. They are stars in street smarts, but dim witted at book and common sense. They bring economic burden and shame to their mostly poor parents who must find attorney fees. They choose misery and hardship as they skip an education for the fast lanes of a thug’s life.


    Dr Eric Williams once said in ‘Trinidad and Tobago money is not a problem. The problem is money.’ One short visit here and you see why. By Caribbean standards, Trinidad and Tobago is a rich country. Its budget is 50 times our own, yet poverty abounds. Vagrants, homeless, drug-crazed and insane souls litter the streets. Wanton waste, deficiencies and inefficiencies are everywhere. Drains in and around Port of Spain are blocked and stagnant for years. Whenever it rains, most of the East Coast floods. The problem certainly is not money.


    Some Trinis drive as though they have a policy for suicide insurance. They kill themselves in record numbers, but I still rate them above our mad drivers. They have roads and highways on which to fly. At home our speeding simply validates the concept of good luck. But as old people say ‘moon run til day ketch um.’


    Daily life here also brings to mind another calypso classic, Sparrow’s ‘Capitalism gone mad’. A pound of bananas cost $4, king fish is $22 and chicken back cost $5.50. We refuse to mention the cost of schoolbooks, clothing and other essentials. A good used car makes a $50,000 dent in your pocket. A 14-seater mini bus will run you $300,000 while a 24 seater goes for $600,000. As Sparrow says ‘Some say it’s nice here in Trinidad, Oh God capitalism gone mad’.


    Ah can’t wait to come home.
    And all them is TK family!

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bago20 View Post
    Vincy, it always takes another person from the outside to tell them they have a problem or something is really wrong but yet they still dont listen.


    Chueeps.
    AS the SAYING GOES, DENIAL is a B-WORD.

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    Gangsta Boogie Bake n Shark's Avatar Bake n Shark is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jomo Thomas
    At home in Trinidad
    Jomo Thomas
    2006/12/08


    I think about home every day, even though Trinidad has been home for the last few months. It is amazing how we take things for granted. At home, my daily exercise ends with a 30 minute swim in the sea. Since I have been here, I have not seen the sea. At home I have the luxury of looking north at the mountains, west at traffic snaking to and from Leeward or west at the majestic ocean.


    Here in Trinidad, I am bored sick looking out at flat land. This is not to say that Trinidad has no mountains. There are mountain ranges that are as imposing as ours. Even with all this sickly feelings, there is a sense of jealousy. At home, we can do with less hills and mountains and much more flat land.


    This sojourn into Trinidad has not been easy, but it is very necessary. Reading for the Certificate in Legal Education at Hugh Wooding Law School (HWLS) promises to be the final lap in a quest for personal acclamation. It guarantees more economic independence and greater intellectual freedom. The structure and organization of the program is ill- conceived and its utility is suspect at best. One student remarked that foreign trained attorneys simply contribute to the economy of Trinidad. It is true; the program cost more than $100,000. However, HWLS is a gate- keeper that foreign- trained attorneys must successfully walk past if they desire to practise in the region.
    But back to observations about Trinidad. Daily one is reminded of a line from one of Lord Valentino’s songs ‘ Trinidad is nice, Trinidad is a paradise’. The country is a true metropolis. All of the world cultures meet here. African, Chinese, European, Indian, Lebanese and Syrian blend to create a beautiful human soup matched only by callaloo. Even so there is an uneasy existence. People live together, but they are miles apart. Ever so often love, crime, politics or commerce cause all hell to break loose.


    Things are at a boil now, following the Privy Council decision that cleared the way for trial of Chief Justice, Satnarine Sharma. The issues make for real bacchanal rivaled only by carnival. An African Chief Magistrate, Sherman Mc Nichols, accused the Chief Justice, an Indian, of attempting to influence the outcome in the trial of Basdeo Panday, the former Prime Minister, who is of Indian descent. Not to be outdone, Chief Justice Sharma called Chief Magistrate Mc Nichols a liar. He further claimed that Prime Minister Patrick Manning and Director of Public Prosecution, Geoffrey Henderson, both of whom are Black, orchestrated the entire affair.


    Notice that whenever tension rises, nobody in the twin island republic is ‘Trini to the bone’. As Valentino said in another calypso classic, ‘On carnival day all ah we is one, but when Ash Wednesday comes we all go back to we race and class’. The merit and demerit of the case is buried behind the façade of politics and race. Compare this with the recent eruption of nationalist unity when the Soca Warriors made us all proud at the World Cup in Germany or Lara’s return to form with a masterly century in 77 balls.


    Piarco Airport compares favourably with the best anywhere. But look behind the splendor, there are rumours and accusations of corruption and wrongdoings. At the corruption trial of former Finance Minister Brian Quitung and five co-defendants, there were about 20 defense attorneys with more than 500 years combined legal experience.
    The rich can clearly afford justice. But as the Panday, Kwai Tung and Sharma trials show, in Trinidad the rich and powerful have less of a chance of buying justice. I wish this system on our country. Rather than pursue Ordan Graham, should we not be redoubling our efforts to root out well-placed sexploiters who rob our youth of their innocence, money launderers, drug traffickers and tax cheats? How about bringing to justice those who connived with foreigners to rip off millions at Ottley Hall?


    Street crime dramatizes another flash point for conflict and division in this oil and gas rich Republic. Trinidad is the kidnapping capital of the world. Unsolved murders have people on edge. Some homes look like prisons. Black males clog the courts. They are stars in street smarts, but dim witted at book and common sense. They bring economic burden and shame to their mostly poor parents who must find attorney fees. They choose misery and hardship as they skip an education for the fast lanes of a thug’s life.


    Dr Eric Williams once said in ‘Trinidad and Tobago money is not a problem. The problem is money.’ One short visit here and you see why. By Caribbean standards, Trinidad and Tobago is a rich country. Its budget is 50 times our own, yet poverty abounds. Vagrants, homeless, drug-crazed and insane souls litter the streets. Wanton waste, deficiencies and inefficiencies are everywhere. Drains in and around Port of Spain are blocked and stagnant for years. Whenever it rains, most of the East Coast floods. The problem certainly is not money.


    Some Trinis drive as though they have a policy for suicide insurance. They kill themselves in record numbers, but I still rate them above our mad drivers. They have roads and highways on which to fly. At home our speeding simply validates the concept of good luck. But as old people say ‘moon run til day ketch um.’


    Daily life here also brings to mind another calypso classic, Sparrow’s ‘Capitalism gone mad’. A pound of bananas cost $4, king fish is $22 and chicken back cost $5.50. We refuse to mention the cost of schoolbooks, clothing and other essentials. A good used car makes a $50,000 dent in your pocket. A 14-seater mini bus will run you $300,000 while a 24 seater goes for $600,000. As Sparrow says ‘Some say it’s nice here in Trinidad, Oh God capitalism gone mad’.


    Ah can’t wait to come home.

    Some merits to his observations...others are laughably superficial. Jomo Thomas continues to prove himself to be a journalistic joke.

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bake n Shark View Post
    Some merits to his observations...others are laughably superficial. Jomo Thomas continues to prove himself to be a journalistic joke.
    Coming from you, I will TAKE it that JOMO is a FANTASTIC JOURNALIST.

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    Registered User dedetriniking's Avatar dedetriniking is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    AS the SAYING GOES, DENIAL is a B-WORD.
    Who denying what here mr. man. The article basically said trinidad is a terrific country but like other countries it has its problems. What's to deny?

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    Gangsta Boogie Bake n Shark's Avatar Bake n Shark is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    Coming from you, I will TAKE it that JOMO is a FANTASTIC JOURNALIST.
    Coming from you Mr. Thomas would be better suited running from any plaudits you lob his way. You are a notorious sycophant and shit stirrer and the last thing anyone would mis-label as an intellect.

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by dedetriniking View Post
    Who denying what here mr. man. The article basically said trinidad is a terrific country but like other countries it has its problems. What's to deny?
    Of course TRINIDAD is a TERRIFIC COUNTRY, just like OTHER COUNTRIES.

    But like some TERRIFIC COUNTRIES, some have more PROBLEMS than OTHERS. That being the CASE, there are those who are in DENIAL of that FACT.

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bake n Shark View Post
    Coming from you Mr. Thomas would be better suited running from any plaudits you lob his way. You are a notorious sycophant and shit stirrer and the last thing anyone would mis-label as an intellect.


    No NEED to SPEAK of yourself.

    MR. THOMAS is a WORTHY JOURNALIST, of course, UNBEKNOWNST to U.

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    Paradise! Professor Abughani's Avatar Professor Abughani is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post


    No NEED to SPEAK of yourself.

    MR. THOMAS is a WORTHY JOURNALIST, of course, UNBEKNOWNST to U.
    You sir are going to make them deport alll the Vincies from Trinidad

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    Registered User dedetriniking's Avatar dedetriniking is offline
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    If by chance we're able to find a trini who is living in SVG, I wonder what an article from him about SVG would look like?

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tha Fugitive View Post
    You sir are going to make them deport alll the Vincies from Trinidad
    They will have to GET rid of MANNING first. Manning is a VINCY by way of his VINCY mother.

    Moreover, if they GET RID of the VINCIES, NO VISAS for them to REACH AMERICA.

    A VINCY is in CHARGE of the TRINIS COMING to AMERICA.

    We got the TRINIS by their.......


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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by dedetriniking View Post
    If by chance we're able to find a trini who is living in SVG, I wonder what an article from him about SVG would look like?
    More than LIKELY, the TRINI will SAY....DAMN...WHAT A RELIEF....NO NEED TO WORRY about being KIDNAPPED.

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    Paradise! Professor Abughani's Avatar Professor Abughani is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    They will have to GET rid of MANNING first. Manning is a VINCY by way of his VINCY mother.

    Moreover, if they GET RID of the VINCIES, NO VISAS for them to REACH AMERICA.

    A VINCY is in CHARGE of the TRINIS COMING to AMERICA.

    We got the TRINIS by their.......

    Case closed!

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