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Thread: Ummmmm......i really didnt know things.....

  1. #1
    ~N.A.T.T.Y Valos~ Val3nie2debone's Avatar Val3nie2debone is offline
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    Unhappy Ummmmm......i really didnt know things.....

    were getting so bad in Hati. I just read this article in the Daily News and it's really sad to know that poverty is that bad in Hati....makes me very thankful for what I have now, no matter how little it is.

    *Mods you guys might move this to the Real Talk Section, but I just wanted to start it over here*


    Uprising in Haiti


    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

    SAINT-MARC, Haiti - An armed uprising spread to nearly a dozen towns in western and northern Haiti yesterday, the strongest challenge yet to President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
    At least 41 people have been killed so far in what the government says is an attempted coup.

    After sporadic gun battles, police regained control yesterday of the important port city of Saint-Marc, 45 miles west of Port-au-Prince.

    On Sunday, government opponents looted container ships, attacked the police station, burned the courthouse and erected flaming barricades on main roads.

    In the first visit by a senior government official to any of the 11 affected towns, Prime Minister Yvon Neptune inspected the charred remains of the Saint-Marc police station yesterday. Neptune called on Haitians to help restore calm.

    "The national police force alone cannot reestablish order," Neptune said. He told state television on Sunday that "the violence is tied to a coup d'état."

    The uprising, which began last week in the city of Gonaives, signals a dangerous turning point in Haiti's longtime political crisis. A similar revolt in 1985 also began in Gonaives and led to the ouster a year later of dictator Jean-Claude Duvalier and the end of a 29-year family dictatorship.

    Tension has mounted since Aristide's party won flawed legislative elections in 2000 and international donors blocked millions of dollars in aid. Misery has deepened with most of the nation's 8 million people living without jobs and on less than $1 a day despite election promises from Aristide, a former priest who had vowed to bring dignity to the poor.

    "Aristide can no longer save the situation for his regime. The end is looming," former President Leslie Manigat said by telephone yesterday. The army ousted Manigat in June 1988 after five months in office.

    With no army and fewer than 5,000 poorly armed police, the Aristide government is ill-equipped to halt the revolt. Police stations have been a major target because they symbolize Aristide's authority.

    Since capturing Gonaives, a city of 200,000 people, on Thursday, the rebels have spread to towns to the west and north, including the Artibonite valley, Haiti's breadbasket.

    The U.S. condemned the violence and called on Aristide's government to respect human rights. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Haiti's problems will be solved by dialogue, negotiation and compromise, not violence.

    UN Secretary General Kofi Annan said that organization "will be stepping up our own involvement fairly soon" but did not elaborate.

  2. #2
    Dawtah of the Sun Empressdududahlin's Avatar Empressdududahlin is offline
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    Gurl the Sunday Express had a picture of a cop already dead getting beaten wit a cutlass by an anti-Aristide rebel! Let me find the article!

  3. #3
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    I don't think that the only problem in Haïti is Aristide, of course he fooled the people, because when he first gain power he was all about the poor people how he would help them and thing. but he is all about the bourgoisie now, he doesn't mingle with poor people anymore, his wife is a "grimelle" he became so rich, his house is a big as the palace. he just doesn't care about the poor anymore. the has bush on his side, yesterday they said in the news that it costs 9 millions US for Aristide security, ...

    i think the biggest problem is that there is to much corruption. aristide goes, someone else will come and he will do the same exact thing. there is only 8 millions Haitians but there is 184 political parties, there is no real opposition. and worst there is no one that really wnat to govern for the love of the country. all they want is to come and make some easy money.

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    ~N.A.T.T.Y Valos~ Val3nie2debone's Avatar Val3nie2debone is offline
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    Originally posted by puntakinte
    I don't think that the only problem in Haïti is Aristide, of course he fooled the people, because when he first gain power he was all about the poor people how he would help them and thing. but he is all about the bourgoisie now, he doesn't mingle with poor people anymore, his wife is a "grimelle" he became so rich, his house is a big as the palace. he just doesn't care about the poor anymore. the has bush on his side, yesterday they said in the news that it costs 9 millions US for Aristide security, ...

    i think the biggest problem is that there is to much corruption. aristide goes, someone else will come and he will do the same exact thing. there is only 8 millions Haitians but there is 184 political parties, there is no real opposition. and worst there is no one that really wnat to govern for the love of the country. all they want is to come and make some easy money.


    i figured money had a lot to do about it. but question, does Haiti have any resources that the US might be interested in....i'm a bit ashamed to ask, because i learned all these things in primary school back home, but damn that was over 10 years ago. But I think that the US is really concerned with the fact they could eventually take over Haiti (i think much sooner than later too). As far as Mr. Aristide is concerned i hope he knows what he's getting himself into....US $9 million for security..oh puleeze yuh know how much stomachs that $9 mil could full.

    btw what does "grimelle" mean....does it mean high color or something?

  5. #5
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    grimelle is a light skin female, more like a mulatto with green eyes...

    i don't see what usa could find interesting about Haiti, maybe it's closeness to cuba so they will be able to keep an eye on fidel, but miami is not that far away....
    we don't have gold, diamond or petrol...
    so what can they take away....

  6. #6
    Dawtah of the Sun Empressdududahlin's Avatar Empressdududahlin is offline
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    Originally posted by puntakinte
    grimelle is a light skin female, more like a mulatto with green eyes...

    i don't see what usa could find interesting about Haiti, maybe it's closeness to cuba so they will be able to keep an eye on fidel, but miami is not that far away....
    we don't have gold, diamond or petrol...
    so what can they take away....
    Also from what I hear, I doh know if I should be saying this, the European Haitians who have the money are funding the Americans to get Aristide out of there, no? I could be wrong... I don't know the views of Haitians on here about Aristide, but Aristide's power and tactics reminds me of Fidel Castro's theory of helping the poor!
    Last edited by Empressdududahlin; 02-10-2004 at 01:05 PM.

  7. #7
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    i don't know about the haitians in europe, but fidel castro did help the poor. 98% of cubans are educated... and the country is not on the verge of a civila war.... one thing that is going to happen when aristide will leave, the people who were for him will get killed it will be a public vendetta all over the country.....

  8. #8
    ~N.A.T.T.Y Valos~ Val3nie2debone's Avatar Val3nie2debone is offline
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    Originally posted by puntakinte
    i don't know about the haitians in europe, but fidel castro did help the poor. 98% of cubans are educated... and the country is not on the verge of a civila war.... one thing that is going to happen when aristide will leave, the people who were for him will get killed it will be a public vendetta all over the country.....

    yes things will get worse for his "backers" when he leaves. but it is true that castro helped the poor.....the thing with the US is they only tell you the bad, ugly side of things...but they never tell u the good things.

  9. #9
    Solidarity
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    hhhhmm...

  10. #10
    a.k.a. Buss_Slippers foxxietrini's Avatar foxxietrini is offline
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    This is really sad. I remember someone had posted an article about the potential of tourism in the country. But with all the political strife, it is impossible for the government to concentrate to much on building that part of the economy.

    My friend is Haitian and he says that he fears for his mother's life at times. She is back in Haiti and lives alone with his sisters. His best friend had already beaten and threatened his mother because of jealousy.

  11. #11
    Island Soul's PD zenzele1's Avatar zenzele1 is offline
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    Originally posted by foxxietrini
    This is really sad. I remember someone had posted an article about the potential of tourism in the country. But with all the political strife, it is impossible for the government to concentrate to much on building that part of the economy.

    My friend is Haitian and he says that he fears for his mother's life at times. She is back in Haiti and lives alone with his sisters. His best friend had already beaten and threatened his mother because of jealousy.
    Foxxie you hit it right on the head. for those of us who still have family residing in Haiti, now the thoughts are of how we can get them out as quickly as possible. Things are very, very bad in Haiti right now. The country is very lawless and their are groups of people roving the country and just killing those coming across their paths. Whether you are politically involved or not. It is very, very sad. Sadest is that we have 200 years of independence, do we have any real freedom?

  12. #12
    Solidarity
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    Originally posted by zenzele1
    ...The country is very lawless and their are groups of people roving the country and just killing those coming across their paths. Whether you are politically involved or not. It is very, very sad. Sadest is that we have 200 years of independence, do we have any real freedom?
    Jus got off the phone with my good friend who is Hatian and we were both lamenting how tough things are in Haiti right now.

    We were saying how it'd be really good if CARICOM could play a more effective role but since the CARICOM member-states themselves all have internal issues, it's difficult for them to be more helpful.

    His position is that during past conflicts, people who weren't "political" were not really targetted. i don't know if it's different this time around. He's waiting on word from one of his relatives that's there now.

    Regarding the question of indpendence and freedom, it is indeed sad that Haiti has not progressed further after all these years. However, we must always remember that slavery, colonialism and imperialism (see links in sig) causes internal collective damage that takes decades and centuries to overcome. i think Haiti and the rest of the Caribbean nations are still in a period of recovery and as tough as it is at times, i'm glad that we fought for and won our "freedom." We will just have to continue the hard work of making the dream of true independence a lasting reality.

  13. #13
    Island Soul's PD zenzele1's Avatar zenzele1 is offline
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    Originally posted by Solidarity


    Regarding the question of indpendence and freedom, it is indeed sad that Haiti has not progressed further after all these years. However, we must always remember that slavery, colonialism and imperialism (see links in sig) causes internal collective damage that takes decades and centuries to overcome. i think Haiti and the rest of the Caribbean nations are still in a period of recovery and as tough as it is at times, i'm glad that we fought for and won our "freedom." We will just have to continue the hard work of making the dream of true independence a lasting reality.
    Soli, couldnt agree with yoiu more. We cant only focus on the current situation. We must place it in a historical context and remember how Haiti has been treated for centuries in this region. We can't forget the fact that Haiti had to indebt itself to France because of pressure brought on by the Americas and the European countries. This debt has been a budern that Haiti has had to bear for generations and it has definitely affected our ability to prosper and to move forward.

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