Results 1 to 9 of 9
Like Tree3Likes
  • 3 Post By Seawall

Thread: UCB Studies Language of a Wrecked African Slave Ship Spoken by Very Few

  1. #1
    Registered User Seawall's Avatar Seawall is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    4,328
    Credits
    11,321,991

    UCB Studies Language of a Wrecked African Slave Ship Spoken by Very Few

    UCB Studies Language of a Wrecked African Slave Ship Spoken by Very Few



    UC Berkeley linguistics professor and graduate students studied the almost dead language of Garifuna.

    UC Berkeley linguistics professor Lev Michael and nine graduate students studied the complex indigenous language of Garifuna, according to a UC Berkeley press release.

    There are approximately 200,000 Garinagu living in Belize, Honduras, Nicaragua and Guatemala. There are also some transplants to Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago and New York City.

    The group worked with native Garifuna (pronounced Ga-RIF-foo-nah) speaker Philip Tim Palacio of Rocklin, California.

    The Garifuna people trace their origins to a wrecked African slave ship that washed ashore in the Caribbean in 1675. On the ship were Calinago, Carib and Arawaks who inhabited the Eastern Caribbean Islands including St. Vincent. Huh?????

    Intermingling of the Caribs, Africans and indigenous Arawaks resulted in the Garifuna language, which also was influenced by English, Spanish and French. Garifuna belongs to the Arawak linguistic family, whose members are mostly found in the Amazon Basin.

    The language, music and dance of the Garifuna were collectively proclaimed a “masterpiece of the oral and intangible heritage of humanity” by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2001.

    Palacio acknowledged that Garifuna can be challenging to translate. “For example, when my dad used to see any of his seven children were wasting time and not working as hard as they should, he would tell us that we were ‘ataha gañé’ (drinking eggs), ‘éleha mesu’ (peeling cats), or ‘adimureha dabarasi’ (talking pan). These expressions are similar to the English expression of ‘being in la-la land.’”

    Students will present their work in a “Garifuna Fest” mini conference on campus on Monday, April 23. In the coming weeks and months, Palacio and the National Garifuna Council in his native country of Belize will print and distribute a Garifuna grammar book based on the students’ work for use by the general public.

    The book will be helpful to Garifuna people in the Caribbean island country of St. Vincent and the Grenadines “who have lost the language completely, as well as people seeking to retrieve or learn the language throughout much of Central America and in the United States, too,” said Palacio.

    “I am happy to do my little part to help save and retrieve the Garifuna culture,” added Palacio, noting that less than 5 percent of the population of Belize speaks Garifuna and most of those speakers are elderly.

    “On a personal level,” he said, “my children do not speak Garifuna, and the same goes for the majority of Garifuna people that I know in my age group. If concrete steps are not taken to retrieve the language, it will definitely be lost.”

    Take a listen to the NPR segment to hear some Garifuna language and music.

    For the original report go to UCB Studies Language of a Wrecked African Slave Ship Spoken by Very Few - Berkeley, CA Patch
    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

    “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters.” Frederick Douglass

  2. #2
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NEW YORK
    Posts
    17,206
    Credits
    101,493,621
    Steups
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  3. #3
    Ganjalero Collie4Nyah's Avatar Collie4Nyah is offline
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    WESTSIDE
    Posts
    5,380
    Credits
    25,982,304
    Nice Article!
    Hibernation is a covert preparation for a more overt action.


  4. #4
    Girl Crush Mrs. Campbell's Avatar Mrs. Campbell is offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Here...
    Posts
    28,678
    Credits
    331,752,124
    Our Queen went to sleep, her people left to weep....in song she lives on.



    Long Live the Queen!

  5. #5
    Qualified Mixologist Maruka is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Brooklyn , Ny
    Posts
    6,602
    Credits
    1,732,914
    LMFAO slave ship brought kalinagos to the islands?

    Good find thou OP

  6. #6
    LB
    Peace Love n Pretty Tings LB is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    At the Crossroads
    Posts
    19,466
    Credits
    57,234,971
    in regards to who was on the slave ship, its odd that they would get information so basic wrong :
    ~ If you make the mountain any bigger you wont be able to move it later

  7. #7
    Registered User sankofaa's Avatar sankofaa is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    fl
    Posts
    9,165
    Credits
    2,110,287,003
    shit bull

  8. #8
    NaturalBornRidah
    Guest
    They're saying that the Garifuna language has Arawk,Carib, Calinago ,French,and Spanish words in it.Its possible during the slave trade a some Amerindians would become enslaved and be put on a slaveship with enslaved Africans, why not ,I think you guys are missing the whole point.
    Last edited by NaturalBornRidah; 04-23-2012 at 09:55 AM.

  9. #9
    It is I bhalistix's Avatar bhalistix is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    brooklyn
    Posts
    8,600
    Credits
    18,481,290
    HELP!!!

    this artilce is confusing, its states

    "The Garifuna people trace their origins to a wrecked African slave ship that washed ashore in the Caribbean in 1675. On the ship were Calinago, Carib and Arawaks who inhabited the Eastern Caribbean Islands including St. Vincent."

    do they speak of those Garifuna people exclusively in Belieze, or the entire race/culture/ethnicity

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •