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Thread: So We Not New To This, We Playing Mas Long Time !

  1. #1
    JA Soca Ambassador socapineman is offline
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    So We Not New To This, We Playing Mas Long Time !

    For those who don't know ....we up in this long time !



    THE CRY "Jonkonnu a come!' meant excitement was near. As soon as the sound of the bands could be heard, people poured out of their houses lining the streets to watch the dancing masqueraders in their larger-than-life costumes. Children of all ages, and even some adults, would often run away screaming, frightened by the more elaborate costumes. Occasionally, some of the individual characters like the Devil, might jab at them with his fork, escalating the fear factor. Up to the 1960s masked Jonkonnu bands could be seen around the island.

    Read more at :


    http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/pages...story0016.html



    or


    Historically, Christmas was the only free time the slaves had in which to enjoy themselves, free from work and Massa's domination - usually for three precious days. In the sugar islands of the Caribbean, although there are significant similarities stemming from common African heritage and European influences, different ways of jollification' sprung up and were maintained after slavery was abolished.

    In Jamaica, up to the fifties and sixties, at Christmastime masked Jonkunnu bands could be seen roaming the streets of towns all over the country playing their lively music, dancing and prancing to entertain the crowds which would invariably be drawn, as a prelude to collecting money. Although a few straggling groups may still come out in the rural areas, sadly, Jonkunnu bands no longer roam the streets of our towns and they are now seen mainly as entertainment at cultural events. Today's children are missing out on the heady feeling which a Jonkunnu band could add to the already magical Christmas season.

    Some of the original bands in the eighteenth century, judging from the Belasario prints in the National Library of Jamaica, appear to have been quite elaborate with Set Girls prettily arrayed in stylish red and blue costumes, (these did not parade on the streets but entertained in houses) Ko-Ko or Actor Boys reciting garbled Shakespeare and other theatrical pieces, and House or Jawbone Jonkonnu who carried the replica of a Great House on his head. As with our language and other cultural forms the masquerade was a mixture of European and African influences


    Read More :
    http://www.geocities.com/shandycan/culture_notes.html
    agroDOLCE likes this.

  2. #2
    ........... ~Urbane~'s Avatar ~Urbane~ is offline
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    This was a Great read.......

    **Knowledge level up By 2+ points**

    Jamaica is a Interesting country.....


    To bad much of this culture is gone
    “I cannot give you the formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure–which is:
    Try to please everybody” Herbert Bayard Swope

  3. #3
    Registered User BRIAN is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by socapineman View Post
    For those who don't know ....we up in this long time !



    THE CRY "Jonkonnu a come!' meant excitement was near. As soon as the sound of the bands could be heard, people poured out of their houses lining the streets to watch the dancing masqueraders in their larger-than-life costumes. Children of all ages, and even some adults, would often run away screaming, frightened by the more elaborate costumes. Occasionally, some of the individual characters like the Devil, might jab at them with his fork, escalating the fear factor. Up to the 1960s masked Jonkonnu bands could be seen around the island.

    Read more at :


    http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/pages...story0016.html



    or


    Historically, Christmas was the only free time the slaves had in which to enjoy themselves, free from work and Massa's domination - usually for three precious days. In the sugar islands of the Caribbean, although there are significant similarities stemming from common African heritage and European influences, different ways of jollification' sprung up and were maintained after slavery was abolished.

    In Jamaica, up to the fifties and sixties, at Christmastime masked Jonkunnu bands could be seen roaming the streets of towns all over the country playing their lively music, dancing and prancing to entertain the crowds which would invariably be drawn, as a prelude to collecting money. Although a few straggling groups may still come out in the rural areas, sadly, Jonkunnu bands no longer roam the streets of our towns and they are now seen mainly as entertainment at cultural events. Today's children are missing out on the heady feeling which a Jonkunnu band could add to the already magical Christmas season.

    Some of the original bands in the eighteenth century, judging from the Belasario prints in the National Library of Jamaica, appear to have been quite elaborate with Set Girls prettily arrayed in stylish red and blue costumes, (these did not parade on the streets but entertained in houses) Ko-Ko or Actor Boys reciting garbled Shakespeare and other theatrical pieces, and House or Jawbone Jonkonnu who carried the replica of a Great House on his head. As with our language and other cultural forms the masquerade was a mixture of European and African influences


    Read More :
    http://www.geocities.com/shandycan/culture_notes.html

    Great post Pineman, I remember Jonkonnu as a child growing up,it would be great if they would/could fully revive it especially for the youths so that they could appreciate where we're coming from. Jamaica is the only island in the caribbean with "throw-away" culture, as soon as we get the new stove we throw out the coalpot while others keep it in museums.

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    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Thumbs up

    Very interesting... socapineman thank you!

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    JA Soca Ambassador socapineman is offline
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    JA Soca Ambassador socapineman is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Influence View Post
    Very interesting... socapineman thank you!
    Thanks...but, believe it or not... not a lot of ppl know about this part of history about Jamaica...

  7. #7
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by socapineman View Post
    Thanks...but, believe it or not... not a lot of ppl know about this part of history about Jamaica...
    Not to put you on the spot but why don't you try to change that ?

  8. #8
    JA Soca Ambassador socapineman is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ~Ragga~ View Post
    This was a Great read.......

    **Knowledge level up By 2+ points**

    Jamaica is a Interesting country.....


    To bad much of this culture is gone



    Not really, just like how a lot of Black American youths are clue-less to how their parents catch hell in America



    Quote Originally Posted by BRIAN View Post
    Great post Pineman, I remember Jonkonnu as a child growing up,it would be great if they would/could fully revive it especially for the youths so that they could appreciate where we're coming from. Jamaica is the only island in the caribbean with "throw-away" culture, as soon as we get the new stove we throw out the coalpot while others keep it in museums.
    Thanks... but, like I stated, some ppl just don't know..... so I have to put it out there !


    Yes you are right about that....the new dance last week , is old news in JA...

  9. #9
    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    SOCAPINEMAN, U doh have to CONVINCE de I of anything.

    I am WELL INFORMED....it is the TRINIS that U have to WAKEUP out of their SLUMBER.

    They're the ones who have FAILED to UNDERSTAND that "WE'RE NOT NEW to this, we're TRUE to THIS."

    But in a way, U CANNOT BLAME THEM....U have to BLAME the PROPAGANDIST of their HISTORY who have GIVEN them the FALSEHOOD of TRINIDAD this n that.

    Ohhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    PS:That was some GOOD INFO still.
    Last edited by VINCYPOWA; 01-12-2007 at 02:14 AM.
    socapineman likes this.

  10. #10
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    SOCAPINEMAN, U doh have to CONVINCE de I of anything.

    I am WELL INFORMED....it is the TRINIS that U have to WAKEUP out of their SLUMBER.

    They're the ones who have FAILED to UNDERSTAND "WE'RE NOT NEW to this, we're TRUE to THIS."

    But in a way, U CANNOT BLAME THEM....U have to BLAME the PROPAGANDIST of their HISTORY who have GIVEN them the FALSEHOOD of TRINIDAD this n that.

    Ohhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    PS:That was some GOOD INFO still.
    one fing yuh consistent!

  11. #11
    Registered User BRIAN is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    SOCAPINEMAN, U doh have to CONVINCE de I of anything.

    I am WELL INFORMED....it is the TRINIS that U have to WAKEUP out of their SLUMBER.

    They're the ones who have FAILED to UNDERSTAND "WE'RE NOT NEW to this, we're TRUE to THIS."

    But in a way, U CANNOT BLAME THEM....U have to BLAME the PROPAGANDIST of their HISTORY who have GIVEN them the FALSEHOOD of TRINIDAD this n that.

    Ohhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    PS:That was some GOOD INFO still.

    Come on VP man, we nah go di bashing route tonight. Just today on the radio here (T.O.) a Jamaican young girl (student at York U) was dropping some history about the Garifunas of St.Vincent and their movements across the region. I was surprised but impress at the same time, cause it was in the middle of a 2hr. reggae show. She usually drops knowledge about our 400yr old journey in Ja. as J'cans (specially for the yutes born here) but this departure was welcome, so in the few weeks she will be island hopping history wise.

  12. #12
    JA Soca Ambassador socapineman is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Influence View Post
    Not to put you on the spot but why don't you try to change that ?


    Man...it would take a lot more than me...but, I try to do my part ! lol.

    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    SOCAPINEMAN, U doh have to CONVINCE de I of anything.

    I am WELL INFORMED....it is the TRINIS that U have to WAKEUP out of their SLUMBER.

    They're the ones who have FAILED to UNDERSTAND that "WE'RE NOT NEW to this, we're TRUE to THIS."

    But in a way, U CANNOT BLAME THEM....U have to BLAME the PROPAGANDIST of their HISTORY who have GIVEN them the FALSEHOOD of TRINIDAD this n that.

    Ohhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    PS:That was some GOOD INFO still.
    Nah...don't take it like that....


    But, rightfully so... I can't begin to tell you the mis-conceptions a lot of them have about this " We Ting "... I am saying so what you think.... the rest of the Islands were doing ! They too have a great history that needs to be told !


    But thanks....

  13. #13
    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRIAN View Post
    Come on VP man, we nah go di bashing route tonight. Just today on the radio here (T.O.) a Jamaican young girl (student at York U) was dropping some history about the Garifunas of St.Vincent and their movements across the region. I was surprised but impress at the same time, cause it was in the middle of a 2hr. reggae show. She usually drops knowledge about our 400yr old journey in Ja. as J'cans (specially for the yutes born here) but this departure was welcome, so in the few weeks she will be island hopping history wise.
    NICEEEEEEEEEEE

    RESPECK

  14. #14
    Registered User trinifrombx is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by socapineman View Post
    For those who don't know ....we up in this long time !



    THE CRY "Jonkonnu a come!' meant excitement was near. As soon as the sound of the bands could be heard, people poured out of their houses lining the streets to watch the dancing masqueraders in their larger-than-life costumes. Children of all ages, and even some adults, would often run away screaming, frightened by the more elaborate costumes. Occasionally, some of the individual characters like the Devil, might jab at them with his fork, escalating the fear factor. Up to the 1960s masked Jonkonnu bands could be seen around the island.

    Read more at :


    http://www.jamaica-gleaner.com/pages...story0016.html



    or


    Historically, Christmas was the only free time the slaves had in which to enjoy themselves, free from work and Massa's domination - usually for three precious days. In the sugar islands of the Caribbean, although there are significant similarities stemming from common African heritage and European influences, different ways of jollification' sprung up and were maintained after slavery was abolished.

    In Jamaica, up to the fifties and sixties, at Christmastime masked Jonkunnu bands could be seen roaming the streets of towns all over the country playing their lively music, dancing and prancing to entertain the crowds which would invariably be drawn, as a prelude to collecting money. Although a few straggling groups may still come out in the rural areas, sadly, Jonkunnu bands no longer roam the streets of our towns and they are now seen mainly as entertainment at cultural events. Today's children are missing out on the heady feeling which a Jonkunnu band could add to the already magical Christmas season.

    Some of the original bands in the eighteenth century, judging from the Belasario prints in the National Library of Jamaica, appear to have been quite elaborate with Set Girls prettily arrayed in stylish red and blue costumes, (these did not parade on the streets but entertained in houses) Ko-Ko or Actor Boys reciting garbled Shakespeare and other theatrical pieces, and House or Jawbone Jonkonnu who carried the replica of a Great House on his head. As with our language and other cultural forms the masquerade was a mixture of European and African influences


    Read More :
    http://www.geocities.com/shandycan/culture_notes.html



    Wow Wow Wow, interesting read, I didn't know that !

  15. #15
    Registered User trinifrombx is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    SOCAPINEMAN, U doh have to CONVINCE de I of anything.

    I am WELL INFORMED....it is the TRINIS that U have to WAKEUP out of their SLUMBER.

    They're the ones who have FAILED to UNDERSTAND that "WE'RE NOT NEW to this, we're TRUE to THIS."

    But in a way, U CANNOT BLAME THEM....U have to BLAME the PROPAGANDIST of their HISTORY who have GIVEN them the FALSEHOOD of TRINIDAD this n that.

    Ohhhhhhhh yeahhhhhhhhhhhhhh

    PS:That was some GOOD INFO still.


    I didn't expect any better from you !


    Not all of us are diniking from the same drink, so know who you are talking about !

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