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Thread: Samyr Laine Aims for Haiti’s First Olympic Medal in 84 Years

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    Samyr Laine Aims for Haiti’s First Olympic Medal in 84 Years

    Samyr Laine Aims for Haiti’s First Olympic Medal in 84 Years


    Mark Zuckerberg’s Harvard roommate to compete in the triple jump in the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London, Alexander Koenig reports for Harvard’s The Crimson.

    A hop, skip, and a jump. An exceptional ability to do those three things in rapid succession, and over large distances, has made Samyr Laine ’06 an elite athlete. It made Laine an All-American in the triple jump in 2005, and it compelled him to defer a number of job offers from elite law firms after earning his J.D. from Georgetown.

    Six years after graduating, it has landed Laine a spot in this summer’s Olympic Games. But despite his atheltics accomplishments heading into London, it is his story that makes him one of the media darlings of the upcoming Olympics.

    Laine, born and raised in New York, will be representing his parents’ home nation of Haiti, and has a chance to unify a country torn apart by the devastating 2010 earthquake and the opportunity to earn the nation’s first individual medal since Silvio Cator took a silver in the 1928 Amsterdam Games.

    Laine has also garnered national headlines because of the man with whom he shared his Straus D-11 suite back in 2002 and 2003. Mark E.

    Zuckerberg, creator of Facebook—Laine was user number 14 on the site—lived with the Olympic athlete during their freshman year.

    But Laine’s story, both at Harvard and elsewhere, is compelling beyond the confines of that fateful dorm room.

    FALSE START

    Laine, who eventually served as the co-captain of the Crimson track and field team, did not make his high school roster as a freshman at Newburgh Academy. Competing as a middle-distance runner in 7th and 8th grade, he was cut in 1998, prompting a switch to tennis.

    But Michael Johnson’s performance in the 200 and 400 meters at the 2000 Sydney Olympics inspired Laine to return to the track, this time as a jumper.

    “Seeing Michael Johnson doing his thing really got me back into it,” Laine said. “Since then, it’s just been hard work. I don’t want to give it up; it’s the general pursuit of excellence.”

    The return proved successful. Laine became an elite high-school athlete and was recruited by a number of colleges, choosing Harvard and matriculating in the fall of 2002.

    THE “THREE STOOGES”

    Once with the Crimson, Laine began a collegiate career that saw him set indoor and outdoor triple jump school records.

    His fellow jumpers in the class of 2006, after finishing their careers at Harvard, remain life-long friends.

    “We referred to ourselves as the ‘Triumvirate’ and the ‘Three Stooges,’” said Travis Hughes ’06, a former long and triple-jumper who is now a Houston-based attorney. “Sam, Lawrence [Adjah ’06], and I became very close, which makes sense considering the fact that we ran, worked out, and jumped together every day for eight months out of the year for four years.”

    Adjah and Laine were co-captains their senior year, and after graduation, both went to the University of Texas to compete as graduate students, with Laine receiving a degree in kinesiology-sports management.

    “The team and support I got while I was in Austin sort of bridged the time between Harvard, Law School, and being a professional track and field athlete,” Laine said. “It really gave me the boost I need.”

    In the summer after starting Law School at Washington University in St. Louis, Hughes moved out to Austin with his former teammates. In the years since Laine began his international track and field career, ‘The Three Stooges’ have been there every step of the way.

    Adjah, Laine’s blockmate at Harvard, will be traveling to London to cheer Laine on.

    “They’ve always been encouraging me, keeping my head high and pushing me to do better and be the best I can be,” Laine said. “As far as support goes, it doesn’t get any better than that.”

    A STUDENT-ATHLETE

    Laine said that his time at Harvard helped him develop the work ethic necessary to balance his studies after college at Georgetown Law School with his budding professional athletic career.

    Though his primary goal is to increase visibility and provide support for Haiti, Laine sees his experience as a teaching moment for young people in America as well.

    “I feel like I’m on a selfless mission. Even though I have my own aspirations, this is for the country of Haiti,” Laine said. “But even for people in the United States who feel like athletic and academic success can’t go hand-in-hand, I hope there are young people out there who see my story and no longer think that that is the case.”

    Laine’s work ethic and selflessness become clear in his personal interactions. He has a self-imposed policy of personally responding to every email sent to his website. On his YouTube account, Laine responds to every comment, often giving young athletes work-out advice and handling snarky internet commenters with grace.

    “His being in London is not a fluke,” Hughes said. “He’s a legit athlete, and he’s a great guy.”

    HAITIAN AT HEART

    Among the curiosities of Laine’s Olympic campaign is the fact that he is competing for Haiti—a nation he had never visited until he was 26.

    But Laine grew up speaking Creole at home. While at Harvard, he was heavily involved with both the Caribbean Club and the Harvard-Haitian Alliance, engaging with the sizeable Haitian community in the greater Boston area.

    “I would say it was more like a Haitian raised in the U.S., rather than an American choosing to compete with Haiti,” Laine said.

    Throughout Laine’s childhood, he added, his mother feared returning to the nation that had caused so much suffering for the family.

    But after a deadly earthquake struck Haiti two years ago, Laine felt compelled to reconnect with his family’s nation of origin and commit himself to improving the lives of his fellow Haitians.

    “After the earthquake happened, and at 26 years old, there’s not much my mother could do,” Laine said. “As a Haitian-American, the culture has always been near and dear to me.”

    Laine hopes that his Olympic pursuits will help lead to better athletic facilities in Haiti, giving children there the same opportunities he had to improve at his craft and compete internationally.

    Leaving Law School as a very successful student Laine has been presented with a number of job opportunities, almost all of which would be more lucrative than what he is currently doing—an important consideration, especially because he is still paying off student loans.

    “I’ve had moments of wavering commitment, but they’ve been few and far between,” Laine said. “There have been opportunities that were hard to pass up, but those will be there in the future. Right now, I have an incredible opportunity to do what I love while being able to talk about Haiti and Haitian athletics. It’s all just to inspire.”

    But Laine is not just going to London to serve as a mascot for a recovering Haiti. He fully intends to compete and figures to have a shot at landing on the podium.

    “I’m prepared, I’m very prepared,” Laine said. “I’m just trying to approach it like business as usual.”

    When he gets to London, he will have never faced tougher competition. But Laine will have a committed group of friends, family, and a nation looking for a hero in his corner.

    “I know that he’s going to do great things, not only on the track, but especially for Haiti,” Hughes said.

    For the original report go to Samyr Laine
    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

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    Thumbs up

    Good for him...I wish him a lot of luck...btw, do you know if he got some shares as an insider of FB?




    BTW, here is a nice story also.....it show the B.S. that G.T. olympic board is on...pure nonsense...I would love to see her in London.


    Medgar Evers track star Kadecia Baird has chance to run for Guyana in London Olympics


    http://www.kaieteurnewsonline.com/20...ndon-olympics/

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    New York Daily News) - Kadecia Baird is usually a blur on the racetrack. The rising senior from Medgar Evers registered the fastest time in the country when she ran the 400 meters in 52.14 at the New Balance Outdoor Nationals earlier this month.
    Yet, when it comes to deciding if she’s going to run for Guyana in the Olympic Games this summer, she’s taken a much more deliberate approach. Baird, who was born in Guyana and lives in Flatbush with her mother and aunt, is grappling with the idea of participating in the London Olympics, which begin on July 27.
    “I’m sort of stuck right now,” Baird said. “My goal was always to run in 2016. I didn’t expect this to happen.”
    But it did. Her time at the New Balance Outdoor Nationals was so fast it exceeded the Olympic B standard qualifying time of 52.35 needed to gain entrance into the Games. Since no one else from Guyana has reached the qualifying time in the 400, Baird can compete in London if she chooses, according to Medgar Evers track coach Nicole Martial, who competed in the 1996 Olympics for Guyana in the triple jump and is active in the Olympic movement in Guyana.
    “It’s pretty exciting that I have this opportunity,” said Baird, who is not a U.S. citizen and therefore cannot run for the U.S. in the Olympics. “This is something that I definitely have to think about. Going out there and competing against people who are a lot older than me — it’s scary stuff. Of course, I can say that at 17, I ran with the pros and went to the Olympics. But I’m not sure what to do at this point.”
    Baird, who has drawn interest from a number of the top track colleges, intends to make a decision when she comes back from the IAAF World Junior Championships in Barcelona, Spain, from July 10-15.
    Martial, who has advised her to compete in London, would like her to decide earlier so that Guyana can finalize its track team. “You have the opportunity — take it,” Martial said. “Take it and see what it’s about and maybe in 2016 you’ll be even more prepared.”
    Another city athlete who could face a similar decision is Cardozo senior Alexis Panisse, who ran the state’s best 600 meter time indoors this season and also shattered the meet record for the 2,000 steeplechase at the Mayor’s Cup.
    If the Tennessee-bound Panisse can achieve the Olympic B standard qualifying time of 2:01.30 in the 800 meters, she could represent the Dominican Republic in London. Panisse, who is of Dominican and Puerto Rican descent, will compete in the Central American and Caribbean Junior Championships in San Salvador, El Salvador, from June 28-July 1.
    More than a week later, she will also participate in the IAAF World Junior Championships in Barcelona. Panisse, who is representing the Dominican in both competitions, was non-committal when asked if competing in the Olympics is on her to-do list this summer.
    “My goal is to ultimately get my times down, to progress,” she said on Tuesday, a day before she flew to El Salvador. “If I can get my times down in El Salvador that would be great, and if I can meet the B standard time in Barcelona that would be a great goal, too.”
    Ray James, an assistant track coach at Cardozo, who accompanied her to El Salvador, said she would have to improve her time by three seconds to reach the 800 qualifying time, but that she’d have to “really consider” going to London if she does.
    “She probably would have to go run for the Dominican Republic in that case,” he said. “They wouldn’t have anyone else as fast as her running that event.”
    Risk-taker: Kerri Gallagher, a former runner from Bishop Kearney, who quit her job as a financial planner to train for the Olympics, qualified for the U.S. Team Trials in the 1500 meters, just beating the B standard time of 4:17.00 by clocking a 4:16.07.
    Gallagher, currently in Eugene, Ore., with her event scheduled for Thursday, told the Daily News in May that if she could qualify for the trials, she would consider her career move a success.

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    LB
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    Now I wonder if those who would say because he wasnt born in Haiti he isnt Haitian and shouldnt represent Haiti....I doubt they will.

    Cant wait to see him compete in the upcoming games. He seems like a very impressive young man.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seawall View Post
    Samyr Laine Aims for Haiti’s First Olympic Medal in 84 Years


    Mark Zuckerberg’s Harvard roommate to compete in the triple jump in the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London, Alexander Koenig reports for Harvard’s The Crimson.

    A hop, skip, and a jump. An exceptional ability to do those three things in rapid succession, and over large distances, has made Samyr Laine ’06 an elite athlete. It made Laine an All-American in the triple jump in 2005, and it compelled him to defer a number of job offers from elite law firms after earning his J.D. from Georgetown.

    Six years after graduating, it has landed Laine a spot in this summer’s Olympic Games. But despite his atheltics accomplishments heading into London, it is his story that makes him one of the media darlings of the upcoming Olympics.

    Laine, born and raised in New York, will be representing his parents’ home nation of Haiti, and has a chance to unify a country torn apart by the devastating 2010 earthquake and the opportunity to earn the nation’s first individual medal since Silvio Cator took a silver in the 1928 Amsterdam Games.

    Laine has also garnered national headlines because of the man with whom he shared his Straus D-11 suite back in 2002 and 2003. Mark E.

    Zuckerberg, creator of Facebook—Laine was user number 14 on the site—lived with the Olympic athlete during their freshman year.

    But Laine’s story, both at Harvard and elsewhere, is compelling beyond the confines of that fateful dorm room.

    FALSE START

    Laine, who eventually served as the co-captain of the Crimson track and field team, did not make his high school roster as a freshman at Newburgh Academy. Competing as a middle-distance runner in 7th and 8th grade, he was cut in 1998, prompting a switch to tennis.

    But Michael Johnson’s performance in the 200 and 400 meters at the 2000 Sydney Olympics inspired Laine to return to the track, this time as a jumper.

    “Seeing Michael Johnson doing his thing really got me back into it,” Laine said. “Since then, it’s just been hard work. I don’t want to give it up; it’s the general pursuit of excellence.”

    The return proved successful. Laine became an elite high-school athlete and was recruited by a number of colleges, choosing Harvard and matriculating in the fall of 2002.

    THE “THREE STOOGES”

    Once with the Crimson, Laine began a collegiate career that saw him set indoor and outdoor triple jump school records.

    His fellow jumpers in the class of 2006, after finishing their careers at Harvard, remain life-long friends.

    “We referred to ourselves as the ‘Triumvirate’ and the ‘Three Stooges,’” said Travis Hughes ’06, a former long and triple-jumper who is now a Houston-based attorney. “Sam, Lawrence [Adjah ’06], and I became very close, which makes sense considering the fact that we ran, worked out, and jumped together every day for eight months out of the year for four years.”

    Adjah and Laine were co-captains their senior year, and after graduation, both went to the University of Texas to compete as graduate students, with Laine receiving a degree in kinesiology-sports management.

    “The team and support I got while I was in Austin sort of bridged the time between Harvard, Law School, and being a professional track and field athlete,” Laine said. “It really gave me the boost I need.”

    In the summer after starting Law School at Washington University in St. Louis, Hughes moved out to Austin with his former teammates. In the years since Laine began his international track and field career, ‘The Three Stooges’ have been there every step of the way.

    Adjah, Laine’s blockmate at Harvard, will be traveling to London to cheer Laine on.

    “They’ve always been encouraging me, keeping my head high and pushing me to do better and be the best I can be,” Laine said. “As far as support goes, it doesn’t get any better than that.”

    A STUDENT-ATHLETE

    Laine said that his time at Harvard helped him develop the work ethic necessary to balance his studies after college at Georgetown Law School with his budding professional athletic career.

    Though his primary goal is to increase visibility and provide support for Haiti, Laine sees his experience as a teaching moment for young people in America as well.

    “I feel like I’m on a selfless mission. Even though I have my own aspirations, this is for the country of Haiti,” Laine said. “But even for people in the United States who feel like athletic and academic success can’t go hand-in-hand, I hope there are young people out there who see my story and no longer think that that is the case.”

    Laine’s work ethic and selflessness become clear in his personal interactions. He has a self-imposed policy of personally responding to every email sent to his website. On his YouTube account, Laine responds to every comment, often giving young athletes work-out advice and handling snarky internet commenters with grace.

    “His being in London is not a fluke,” Hughes said. “He’s a legit athlete, and he’s a great guy.”

    HAITIAN AT HEART

    Among the curiosities of Laine’s Olympic campaign is the fact that he is competing for Haiti—a nation he had never visited until he was 26.

    But Laine grew up speaking Creole at home. While at Harvard, he was heavily involved with both the Caribbean Club and the Harvard-Haitian Alliance, engaging with the sizeable Haitian community in the greater Boston area.

    “I would say it was more like a Haitian raised in the U.S., rather than an American choosing to compete with Haiti,” Laine said.

    Throughout Laine’s childhood, he added, his mother feared returning to the nation that had caused so much suffering for the family.

    But after a deadly earthquake struck Haiti two years ago, Laine felt compelled to reconnect with his family’s nation of origin and commit himself to improving the lives of his fellow Haitians.

    “After the earthquake happened, and at 26 years old, there’s not much my mother could do,” Laine said. “As a Haitian-American, the culture has always been near and dear to me.”

    Laine hopes that his Olympic pursuits will help lead to better athletic facilities in Haiti, giving children there the same opportunities he had to improve at his craft and compete internationally.

    Leaving Law School as a very successful student Laine has been presented with a number of job opportunities, almost all of which would be more lucrative than what he is currently doing—an important consideration, especially because he is still paying off student loans.

    “I’ve had moments of wavering commitment, but they’ve been few and far between,” Laine said. “There have been opportunities that were hard to pass up, but those will be there in the future. Right now, I have an incredible opportunity to do what I love while being able to talk about Haiti and Haitian athletics. It’s all just to inspire.”

    But Laine is not just going to London to serve as a mascot for a recovering Haiti. He fully intends to compete and figures to have a shot at landing on the podium.

    “I’m prepared, I’m very prepared,” Laine said. “I’m just trying to approach it like business as usual.”

    When he gets to London, he will have never faced tougher competition. But Laine will have a committed group of friends, family, and a nation looking for a hero in his corner.

    “I know that he’s going to do great things, not only on the track, but especially for Haiti,” Hughes said.

    For the original report go to Samyr Laine
    dollbabi likes this.
    "Twats you people be" - Chinks

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    Some people get you and some people don’t, and to spend your life trying to make people understand how deep and complex and varied you are — I think that way lies madness - K. Blanchett

    "The leopard's stealthy gait is not a result of cowardice; it is simply stalking a prey." (Do not mistake people's gentle nature for spinelessness) - Yoruba Proverb

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    Good luck to him!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seawall View Post
    Samyr Laine Aims for Haiti’s First Olympic Medal in 84 Years


    Mark Zuckerberg’s Harvard roommate to compete in the triple jump in the Games of the XXX Olympiad in London, Alexander Koenig reports for Harvard’s The Crimson.

    A hop, skip, and a jump. An exceptional ability to do those three things in rapid succession, and over large distances, has made Samyr Laine ’06 an elite athlete. It made Laine an All-American in the triple jump in 2005, and it compelled him to defer a number of job offers from elite law firms after earning his J.D. from Georgetown.

    Six years after graduating, it has landed Laine a spot in this summer’s Olympic Games. But despite his atheltics accomplishments heading into London, it is his story that makes him one of the media darlings of the upcoming Olympics.

    Laine, born and raised in New York, will be representing his parents’ home nation of Haiti, and has a chance to unify a country torn apart by the devastating 2010 earthquake and the opportunity to earn the nation’s first individual medal since Silvio Cator took a silver in the 1928 Amsterdam Games.

    Laine has also garnered national headlines because of the man with whom he shared his Straus D-11 suite back in 2002 and 2003. Mark E.

    Zuckerberg, creator of Facebook—Laine was user number 14 on the site—lived with the Olympic athlete during their freshman year.

    But Laine’s story, both at Harvard and elsewhere, is compelling beyond the confines of that fateful dorm room.

    FALSE START

    Laine, who eventually served as the co-captain of the Crimson track and field team, did not make his high school roster as a freshman at Newburgh Academy. Competing as a middle-distance runner in 7th and 8th grade, he was cut in 1998, prompting a switch to tennis.

    But Michael Johnson’s performance in the 200 and 400 meters at the 2000 Sydney Olympics inspired Laine to return to the track, this time as a jumper.

    “Seeing Michael Johnson doing his thing really got me back into it,” Laine said. “Since then, it’s just been hard work. I don’t want to give it up; it’s the general pursuit of excellence.”

    The return proved successful. Laine became an elite high-school athlete and was recruited by a number of colleges, choosing Harvard and matriculating in the fall of 2002.

    THE “THREE STOOGES”

    Once with the Crimson, Laine began a collegiate career that saw him set indoor and outdoor triple jump school records.

    His fellow jumpers in the class of 2006, after finishing their careers at Harvard, remain life-long friends.

    “We referred to ourselves as the ‘Triumvirate’ and the ‘Three Stooges,’” said Travis Hughes ’06, a former long and triple-jumper who is now a Houston-based attorney. “Sam, Lawrence [Adjah ’06], and I became very close, which makes sense considering the fact that we ran, worked out, and jumped together every day for eight months out of the year for four years.”

    Adjah and Laine were co-captains their senior year, and after graduation, both went to the University of Texas to compete as graduate students, with Laine receiving a degree in kinesiology-sports management.

    “The team and support I got while I was in Austin sort of bridged the time between Harvard, Law School, and being a professional track and field athlete,” Laine said. “It really gave me the boost I need.”

    In the summer after starting Law School at Washington University in St. Louis, Hughes moved out to Austin with his former teammates. In the years since Laine began his international track and field career, ‘The Three Stooges’ have been there every step of the way.

    Adjah, Laine’s blockmate at Harvard, will be traveling to London to cheer Laine on.

    “They’ve always been encouraging me, keeping my head high and pushing me to do better and be the best I can be,” Laine said. “As far as support goes, it doesn’t get any better than that.”

    A STUDENT-ATHLETE

    Laine said that his time at Harvard helped him develop the work ethic necessary to balance his studies after college at Georgetown Law School with his budding professional athletic career.

    Though his primary goal is to increase visibility and provide support for Haiti, Laine sees his experience as a teaching moment for young people in America as well.

    “I feel like I’m on a selfless mission. Even though I have my own aspirations, this is for the country of Haiti,” Laine said. “But even for people in the United States who feel like athletic and academic success can’t go hand-in-hand, I hope there are young people out there who see my story and no longer think that that is the case.”

    Laine’s work ethic and selflessness become clear in his personal interactions. He has a self-imposed policy of personally responding to every email sent to his website. On his YouTube account, Laine responds to every comment, often giving young athletes work-out advice and handling snarky internet commenters with grace.

    “His being in London is not a fluke,” Hughes said. “He’s a legit athlete, and he’s a great guy.”

    HAITIAN AT HEART

    Among the curiosities of Laine’s Olympic campaign is the fact that he is competing for Haiti—a nation he had never visited until he was 26.

    But Laine grew up speaking Creole at home. While at Harvard, he was heavily involved with both the Caribbean Club and the Harvard-Haitian Alliance, engaging with the sizeable Haitian community in the greater Boston area.

    “I would say it was more like a Haitian raised in the U.S., rather than an American choosing to compete with Haiti,” Laine said.

    Throughout Laine’s childhood, he added, his mother feared returning to the nation that had caused so much suffering for the family.

    But after a deadly earthquake struck Haiti two years ago, Laine felt compelled to reconnect with his family’s nation of origin and commit himself to improving the lives of his fellow Haitians.

    “After the earthquake happened, and at 26 years old, there’s not much my mother could do,” Laine said. “As a Haitian-American, the culture has always been near and dear to me.”

    Laine hopes that his Olympic pursuits will help lead to better athletic facilities in Haiti, giving children there the same opportunities he had to improve at his craft and compete internationally.

    Leaving Law School as a very successful student Laine has been presented with a number of job opportunities, almost all of which would be more lucrative than what he is currently doing—an important consideration, especially because he is still paying off student loans.

    “I’ve had moments of wavering commitment, but they’ve been few and far between,” Laine said. “There have been opportunities that were hard to pass up, but those will be there in the future. Right now, I have an incredible opportunity to do what I love while being able to talk about Haiti and Haitian athletics. It’s all just to inspire.”

    But Laine is not just going to London to serve as a mascot for a recovering Haiti. He fully intends to compete and figures to have a shot at landing on the podium.

    “I’m prepared, I’m very prepared,” Laine said. “I’m just trying to approach it like business as usual.”

    When he gets to London, he will have never faced tougher competition. But Laine will have a committed group of friends, family, and a nation looking for a hero in his corner.

    “I know that he’s going to do great things, not only on the track, but especially for Haiti,” Hughes said.

    For the original report go to Samyr Laine
    I LOOOOOOOVE his story!!!!! Awwwwwwwwwwwww!

    We should all cheer for him no matter what country we're from, just on principle!

    Sanya Richards shoulda do weh him do but anyway. lols.
    Who has eyes to see, let them see...

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    Quote Originally Posted by LB View Post
    Now I wonder if those who would say because he wasnt born in Haiti he isnt Haitian and shouldnt represent Haiti....I doubt they will.

    Cant wait to see him compete in the upcoming games. He seems like a very impressive young man.
    Nah if you have even one parent from a country you can become a citizen of that country by descent. Except maybe the U.S. that require both parents to be citizens? Not sure on them.

    Jamaica allow citizenship by descent for having one parent...just have to apply for it. So I'm not sure if they have to actually obtain the citizenship to rep when it comes to sports, but seems easy enough to pick and choose. He's not calling himself Haitian though, he said Haitian-American. Which is right.
    Who has eyes to see, let them see...

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    Registered User Poca's Avatar Poca is offline
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    Personally, I think only the people who are born in a country should represent that country. This dude obviously have Haitian parents but he isn't Haitian. To me, it looks like a consolation representation. And the truth is, if he was representing USA and won, all Haitians would be proud of him nonetheless.


    Quote Originally Posted by LB View Post
    Now I wonder if those who would say because he wasnt born in Haiti he isnt Haitian and shouldnt represent Haiti....I doubt they will.

    Cant wait to see him compete in the upcoming games. He seems like a very impressive young man.

  9. #9
    Gladiator
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    in SOME cases its easier for athletes to make the Haitian, Trini, Bajan (using random examples) than to make the U.S team...you will be a fool to think this does not influence their decision when choosing which country to represent
    Last edited by Gladiator; 07-19-2012 at 11:03 PM.

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    LB
    Peace Love n Pretty Tings LB is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Nah if you have even one parent from a country you can become a citizen of that country by descent. Except maybe the U.S. that require both parents to be citizens? Not sure on them.

    Jamaica allow citizenship by descent for having one parent...just have to apply for it. So I'm not sure if they have to actually obtain the citizenship to rep when it comes to sports, but seems easy enough to pick and choose. He's not calling himself Haitian though, he said Haitian-American. Which is right.
    lol.I am just referring to those on the site who said if you arent born in such and such country you say you are from there. So its ironic that he is an American born Haitian repping Haiti, and those same ppl who say in another context he isnt Haitian enough. that's all I am getting at.
    "Twats you people be" - Chinks

    "Don't try to win over the haters, you're not the jackass whisperer."

    Some people get you and some people don’t, and to spend your life trying to make people understand how deep and complex and varied you are — I think that way lies madness - K. Blanchett

    "The leopard's stealthy gait is not a result of cowardice; it is simply stalking a prey." (Do not mistake people's gentle nature for spinelessness) - Yoruba Proverb

  11. #11
    Registered User Poca's Avatar Poca is offline
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    I believe that until very recently, there was no such thing as a dual citizenship under the Haitian constitution.



    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Nah if you have even one parent from a country you can become a citizen of that country by descent. Except maybe the U.S. that require both parents to be citizens? Not sure on them.

    Jamaica allow citizenship by descent for having one parent...just have to apply for it. So I'm not sure if they have to actually obtain the citizenship to rep when it comes to sports, but seems easy enough to pick and choose. He's not calling himself Haitian though, he said Haitian-American. Which is right.

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