Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: R.I.P Sir Harold St. John

  1. #1
    The Great Pretender Sugahkhayne's Avatar Sugahkhayne is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    In my skin
    Posts
    16,502
    Credits
    1,041,886

    R.I.P Sir Harold St. John

    Room for 1 300 at state funeral - Saturday 06, March-2004

    Just over 1 000 people will be able to attend the state funeral service for the late Sir Harold St John on Monday, but it will only be on a ticket basis.
    This was revealed yesterday at a Press conference at the funeral site, Christ Church Parish Church.

    Tickets, giving seating to about 1 300 people, will be available from Government Headquarters and Oistins Fishing Complex today on a first-come-first-serve basis.

    Chairman of the Barbados Labour Party, Dame Billie Miller, said at the end of a two-hour rehearsal for personnel involved in the service on Monday, that several tents would be erected around the church grounds and the church hall would have seating, as well with a large screen projection of the procession and service.

    She said all seating had been identified and several contingency plans were in place in the event of bad weather, adding that all arrangements were “going well”.

    This state funeral would differ from those of the past, Dame Billie added, as the procession, which begins at Clyde B. Jones Funeral Home in Top Rock at 1:40 p.m., would stop for a short period in Oistins “which Sir Harold loved, to allow people to give their last salute”.

    The end of that stop will be signalled by the blowing of a conch shell. The 148-strong cortege will proceed to the church and will be joined by dignitaries along the way.

    Additionally, a flotilla of fishing boats, led by the Coast Guard flagship, HMS Trident, will follow the procession by sea.

    Chief of Staff of the Barbados Defence Force, Colonel Alvin Quintyne, said a number of groups, including several schools, the cadet corps, airport security guards, fisherfolk, the Barbados Fire Service and Government security guards, among others, had indicated an interest in participating in the procession and would line the route to the church.

    Dame Billie stressed that security was a high consideration on Monday and barricades would be in place.

    But, she said, they would try as much as possible to accommodate those who came to pay their last respects.

    http://www.nationnews.com/StoryView....2000%3A00%3A00
    Some men move mountains
    Some women move men who move mountains
    Most women with mountains move some men
    But I...I am a woman who is moved by men who can get through the valley

    Queen GodIs

  2. #2
    da sweet one Sweetie's Avatar Sweetie is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    13,688
    Credits
    12,793
    I read about this yesterday .. may he RIP

  3. #3
    Dawtah of the Sun Empressdududahlin's Avatar Empressdududahlin is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    in a sacred space...
    Posts
    27,131
    Credits
    1,550,950
    Yeah man, this is sad! R.I.P!

  4. #4
    The Great Pretender Sugahkhayne's Avatar Sugahkhayne is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    In my skin
    Posts
    16,502
    Credits
    1,041,886

    some background info

    Sir Harold St John
    Elder statesman and sometime Prime Minister of Barbados
    03 March 2004

    Harold Bernard St John, lawyer and politician: born Christ Church, Barbados 16 August 1931; called to the Bar, Inner Temple 1954; Chair, Barbados Labour Party 1966-71; QC 1969; Prime Minister of Barbados 1985-86; Kt 1994; married Stella Hope (one son, two daughters); died Bridgetown, Barbados 29 February 2004.

    Harold St John was a leading Barbadian politician, an elder statesman of the ruling Barbados Labour Party (BLP), and served as Prime Minister in the mid-1980s. He was also a tireless campaigner for Caribbean integration.

    Harold Bernard St John was born in 1931. He read Law at University College London, graduating in 1953, and was called to the Bar in the following year. He later practised throughout the eastern Caribbean, as well as in his native country. In 1959, St John joined the Barbados Labour Party (BLP), which had been founded in 1946 - while the island was still a British colony - as an offshoot of the trade-union movement. In 1964, two years before independence, he was nominated to the appointed senate, as an opposition representative, and was elected to the House of Assembly in 1966.

    In 1976 the BLP defeated the more left-wing Democratic Labour Party (DLP) for the first time in more than a decade, and went on to win a second successive term in the 1981 elections. St John served during this period as Deputy Prime Minister, Minister of Trade and Industry and Minister of Tourism under Tom Adams, and succeeded him on his sudden death in 1985.

    He took much of the credit for the rapid development of the tourist industry in Barbados, which had replaced sugar as the mainstay of the economy from the early 1960s, and later with the growth of the offshore financial services sector.

    St John's time as Prime Minister was brief: the BLP was heavily defeated by the DLP in the May 1986 elections, winning only three seats in the 27-seat assembly. St John, who lost his own seat, paid for this disaster with his job, and was replaced as BLP leader by Henry (later Sir Henry) Forde, a former foreign minister.

    Although Barbadian politics were closely modelled on the Westminster system, and the country had become reasonably prosperous and stable, with a growing black middle class, racial tensions were still not far below the surface. The BLP had become identified with the light-skinned business class, who poured money into the party, while the DLP appealed more to disadvantaged black Bajans. Even more damaging, the BLP supported Washington's assertive policy in the Caribbean, and in 1983 Tom Adams had been a strong supporter of the US invasion of Grenada, to dislodge a Cuban-backed, left-wing government.

    It took the BLP until 1994 to regain power, under an effective new leader, Owen Arthur. St John was appointed his deputy, and was knighted in the same year. He stepped down in 1999, and retired as MP for Christ Church in 2003. Paying tribute to his former deputy, Owen Arthur said yesterday: "He established and maintained an unblemished record for honesty, decency and integrity. As such he leaves a splendid example for those of us left behind."

    St John was a supporter of the failed West Indies Federation, which collapsed in 1962. His later work for regional economic integration included chairing the Africa, Caribbean and Pacific (ACP) group delegation to the Lomé Convention negotiations establishing a trade and aid agreement between Europe and her former colonies. His most recent appointment was as lead negotiator in a fisheries dispute with Trinidad and Tobago.

    Colin Harding

    http://news.independent.co.uk/people...p?story=497239
    Some men move mountains
    Some women move men who move mountains
    Most women with mountains move some men
    But I...I am a woman who is moved by men who can get through the valley

    Queen GodIs

  5. #5
    The Great Pretender Sugahkhayne's Avatar Sugahkhayne is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    In my skin
    Posts
    16,502
    Credits
    1,041,886
    HIS PIC
    Some men move mountains
    Some women move men who move mountains
    Most women with mountains move some men
    But I...I am a woman who is moved by men who can get through the valley

    Queen GodIs

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •