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Thread: Parang Parang and more Parang

  1. #1
    Junior Member Chexx is offline
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    Parang Parang and more Parang

    Well allyuh know Christmas is near. So D'Jumbie family
    want de people tuh feel de vibes. Check out our tunes page
    at djumbies.com and listen to tunes and dem, turn up de tempo and hold ah bottle and spoon, dingolay on yuh gyul friend bumsee.
    This one going out tuh de bachnal ladies and dem.
    Sooks, Back-a-nal, Chilli-bi-bi, Klim, Brownskin, Socababy, ################reegyal, msfetta, Ilandfantcy, and de rest ah rude gyals and dem.


  2. #2
    baltimore bandit
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    yeah i just check it, y'all got some nice tunes there.

    bring back a lot of memories of Trini christmas with them tunes.

  3. #3
    Blessed ILanDFnTsY's Avatar ILanDFnTsY is offline
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    Chexx that Parang really make me want to go to Trini for Xmas.

    See you on the 22nd.

  4. #4
    Blessed Ms SocaBaby is offline
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    Almost everyone on this site knows what parang is, and what is sounds like, and even how to dance it. But I feel not everyone truly knows its origins and meanings.
    Courtesy of Cristo Adonis' de los Ninos del Mundo @ www.carnaval.com, I found this:


    A. The word "Parang" comes from the Spanish word "parranda," which amongst other things means "spree," i.e., to go on a spree is "ir de parranda" or to spree, "parrandear." In Trinidad it refers to a particular type of music, now folkloric, of Hispanic American origins. Not everywhere in Latin America or the Spanish Caribbean will people understand "parranda" to be a type of music; in the Dominican Republic for instance they refer to this music simply as "Aguinaldos," that is, just one of the types of songs sung in Trinidad Parang.

    B. Traditional Parang bands often consisted of four to six singers accompanied by guitar, cuatro, mandolin, box base, and maracas. They would move from house to house during festive seasons, singing in the homes of families, greeted with drinks and food, and there were specific steps or rituals that accompanied the entry to a home, the dedication of songs to a host, the eating and drinking, and the departure. Today, many bands have been "professionalized," with corporate sponsorship, consisting of sometimes as many as 25 musicians, and often taking part in annual competitions that are televised and/or broadcast on radio.

    C. As the National Parang Association sees it, the events of Parang are centred on the birth of Christ (i.e., the aguinaldos, and songs such as "La anunciacion" and "El nacimiento"). However, there are other songs that refer also to the death and resurrection of Christ and other episodes in Christ's life. Hence, we may find a more limited version of Parang festivities, in very few places today, at Easter time. Yet, Parang is not just religious music: there are many common and traditional songs that have nothing to do with the Holy Bible (i.e., "Rio Manzanare," or Los Ninos del Mundo's "Se vera la conia"), and sometimes are explicitly about alcoholic drinks (i.e., "Guarapo" a drink made from fermented can juice known amongst post-Colonial Amerindians as "Warap"). This variety in the music raises some definitional problems: not all religious music sung in Spanish is Parang (such as the prayer songs sung during a Velorio de la Cruz, i.e., a family's annual private devotion to a particular saint which involves singing through the night amongst other things); not all music sung in Spanish, religious or not, is Parang; moreover, now there is even Parang that is not sung in Spanish at all, and this is not counting the hybrid offshoots in Trinidad such as Soca Parang and Chutney Parang.

    D. In the religious Parang music of the Christmas season, there are some basic song themes that are upheld: 1. the apparition of the Angel Gabriel to Mary, 2. Mary's visit to her cousin Elizabeth, 3. the flight of the Holy Family from Nazareth to Bethlehem, 4. the Alegrias when Christ was born in a manger, 5. the Nacimiento - twelve days of celebration during Christmas, 6. Los Reyes (or Les Rois, what Trinidadians sometimes pronounce and even spell as "lewah") when the three wise men brought gifts to the Infant Jesus.

    E. There are two theories concerning the emergence and development of Parang in Trinidad. One is that Parang emerged from the process of catechization of Amerindians performed by the Franciscan Capuchins in the Indian Missions in Trinidad from roughly the 1680s to almost a century later. One problem is that this does not account for songs that make reference to specific features of the geography of Venezuela. The second theory is that Trinidad Parang is comparatively more modern, suggesting that it is primarily a nineteenth-century phenomenon stemming from the massive importation of Venezuelan peons to work on the Cocoa estates during the Cocoa boom of the 1870-1920 period. While one may ponder whether to choose one theory and reject the other, or try to reconcile both theories, or reject both, and so on, there is one basic assumption that underlies this debate, the key position on which the theories rest. Whichever theory we choose will depend on whether or not we accept a theory of Hispanicized Amerindian continuity in Trinidad. If we do, we adopt the first theory, and maybe adopt parts of the second theory as an after-thought. If we do not, then we can only embrace the Venezuelan theory. What most Parang scholars can agree on, however, is that this music form did not come, as it is today, straight from Spain and remain unmodified. Hence, the consensus is that it is a hybrid, Spanish American creole cultural form.

    F. Instruments commonly featured in Parang music are: the guitar, banjo, mandolin, box base, cuatro violin, wood flute, tambourine, clapper, toc-toc, maracas, and the scratcher. It is rare to find the full range of instruments listed being played simulatenously by one band in one song.

    G. Parang season usually lasted from mid-October until January 6. Recently, the National Parang Festival has started from as early as September 26. The onset of Carnival, which many Trinidadians assume must immediately follow Christmas Day without hesitation, has somewhat cramped the space for Parang. The growth of Soca Parang, a Carnivalized version of Parang, also crowds the space for actual Parang music.

    H. Parranderos, especially those with roots in the cocoa industry, emerge from places such as Arima, San Raphael, Mausica, Lopinot, Santa Cruz, St. Joseph, Caura, St. Anns, Maraval, Rancho Quemado, Erin and Palo Seco.

    I. Parang is not now the exclusive reserve of people of Spanish American descent. In fact, it is hard to find one community in multi-ethnic Trinidad that is not represented to a significant degree, which may be truer of Parang than of any other festival art form in Trinidad and Tobago.

    Peace and Love
    socababy, always smilin



  5. #5
    Blessed Ms SocaBaby is offline
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    Oh gosh Chexx, yuh really have meh in d Christmas spirit after listenin to those tunes...

    I nevah went Trinidad for Christmas, and I can only imagine what it like!!! But oh gosh I smellin d sweetbread, cocunut bake, home-made bread, d black cake, d ham, d sponge cake...where meh puncha crema?

    This is meh favorite holiday!

    Peace and Love
    socababy, always smilin

    PS: I know dat Parang history rhel long, lol, sorry!!!
    But it education :)

  6. #6
    amprincess
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    very informative socababy, looks like you good at doing homework! :-)

  7. #7
    Blessed ILanDFnTsY's Avatar ILanDFnTsY is offline
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    I hope you studying for finals that hard miss lady.

  8. #8
    Blessed Ms SocaBaby is offline
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    of course Iland...because once I done finals on the 21st, allyuh know where I go be d next day...


    WAREHOUSE!!!



    Peace and Love
    socababy, always smilin

  9. #9
    Alliance mih seh!!!! cunchreegal's Avatar cunchreegal is offline
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    RE: Parang Parang and more Parang

    thanxs for the info on history Socababy:) Chexx i loving the tunes to the fullest!!!!! big up D'jumbies

  10. #10
    Junior Member Chexx is offline
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    Allyuh Like them.

    I glad allyuh like the songs, we have more tuh come.
    SocaBaby buh ay ay, yuh ain't know school does give meh enough
    readings to do LOL. But I glad fuh yuh the lesson.

    Just like ################reegal I taking one shot of rum punch after Finals.


  11. #11
    The Baddest Ever TheExecutive2k7 is offline
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    And Special Thanks to Soca Arena and Club Tobago


  12. #12
    Alliance mih seh!!!! cunchreegal's Avatar cunchreegal is offline
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    RE: Allyuh Like them.

    its the best remedy!!:)

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