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  1. #31
    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    PANAMA
    2002 Black Population: App. 600,000
    Panama was the first place in the Western region`s mainland that had a Black settlement. Formerly, a part of Colombia until its independence in 1903, Panama is not always considered a Central American nation, historically at least. The first Blacks arrived around 1513 as explorers who built vessels, the next batch arrived a few years later as slaves who transported goods from ships and to work on gold mines. [B]The first African slave rebellion in the Americas took place in Panama as they overpowered the slavemasters and received help from the AmerIndians.[/B] These people were called "cimmarones" (the wild ones) but are now known as "Playeros" (the beach people), Spanish speaking and Roman Catholic Black people.

    1849 marked the building of the Panama Railroad and the opportunity for work. It also marked a second coming of Black people as Afro-Caribbeans, mostly from Jamaica, Barbados and Trinidad, were recruited to work on the railroad. In 1880, the French started work on the Compagnie Universelle du Canal Interoceanique. Its purpose was for a transoceanic canal across the ithmus. Finally, the building of the Panama Canal by the USA began in 1907. Like the building of the railroad, Blacks were recruited to work for the French and the Americans in Panama. Workers lost their lives during construction of all 3 projects and after the jobs were done, most Blacks remained. Racial segregation has been taking place ever since the building of the canal. A "Gold" and "Silver" label was used in Panama, White workers were paid in gold while Blacks were paid in silver. Public facilities were labeled "gold" and "silver". The label was not only used in the Canal Zone, but in all of Panama for many years. Afro-Caribbeans preserved their culture and traditional ways as a way to rebel against North Americans and other Latinos. Conflicts between them and Spanish-speaking Panamanians last through today. Discrimination and lack of citizenship caused Afro-Caribbeans to stick together even more and develop their own communities with Protestant churches, schools and businesses. Just like Abraham Lincoln wanted to deport all Afro-Americans back to Africa, former Panama president, Arnulfo Arias tried to deport all Afro-Caribbeans, East Indians and Chinese out of Panama. Segregation in the Panama Canal Zone ended during the Noriega regime and the government has made laws to enable equal treatment. Their West Indian culture has been and is always on the rise in Panama. Most Blacks from Panama, when they migrate to the USA, don`t always identify as Latinos but as spanish-speaking Blacks. Calypso, Reggae, Soca, Creole English and French, have all been retained.

    The original Blacks in the country are nicknamed "nativos" while the Afro-Caribbeans are known as "antillanos". The lack of unity between these two groups is very surprising. There are still laws that are directed towards Afro-Caribbeans in Panama but they are getting closer everyday to equal human rights. Both groups have been fighting for their rights for 500 years.
    [/QUOTE]

  2. #32
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  4. #34
    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    Panama is a mixing bowl of people of different ethnic backgrounds.

    Its unique and different from any other country that also has mixture of races...

    To better understand Panama you must understand its history to understand the dynamics of the culture today.

    Panama is a Central American nation with the strongest historical links to Africa and the Caribbean. The first link comes from the long history of African slavery in Panama, although the number of slaves was small by comparison to Caribbean plantations.

    The second link and the most important comes from the thousands of West Indian immigrants.

    These peoples came for the building of the Panama railroad, canal and Banana Company (Chiriqui), giving way to the modern Panamanian working class.


    THE PANAMA CANAL

    Most of the Canal's workforce during the US construction period in the early 20th century arrived in Panama from the West Indies, on board the steamship Cristobal.

    However, the Caribbean governments were reluctant to allow recruiting, because at the end of the French period of construction, many of the West Indian laborers had been stranded in Panama, and they had to be repatriated at their governments' expense.

    The Barbados government finally agreed to large-scale recruitment, however, and eventually there were some 19,900 Barbadian laborers working on the Canal project. This was reportedly some 10 per cent of the population of Barbados, and nearly 40 per cent of the island's adult men. Later, workers were also recruited from Martinique and Guadeloupe.

    Jamaica refused to allow any recruiting, (SCHEUUUUUUUUUUUPPPPS) and placed a tax of one pound sterling on anyone wishing to work in Panama. This meant that the Jamaican workers in Panama were mostly skilled workers, as only they could afford the tax.At its peak in 1913, the workforce consisted of 44,000 persons.
    West Indian workers were the canal's unsung heroes. Each day, 200 trainloads of dirt had to be hauled away. More than 25,000 worked as canal diggers--three times the number of American who worked on the canal. Between 1904 and 1915, 5,600 lives were lost to disease and accidents. Most of those who died were from Barbados.



    Just like everywhere else in turn of the century America, there was race separation on the canal. The vast majority of the labor came from Latin America, mainly from Barbados. These workers were paid 10 cents an hour for a 10 hour day 6 days a week, and given no special living arrangements. They were the labor, the men in the pits digging with their own brute strength. They were paid in silver. The white Americans, on the other hand, were paid in gold. They were the teachers, nurses, doctors, steam shovel and the train drivers, and engineers. Less than ten percent of the total workforce was American.http://www1.union.edu/~melvillj/proj...er/project.htm

    People do not realize the significance the Canal played in the history of the Caribbean

    One example's include the Virgin Islands:Construction of the Panama Canal and the rise of German naval strength induced the U.S. government to consider the islands' importance again. Word was conveyed to the Danes that if Germany gave any indication of activity in the Caribbean, the U.S. would immediately seize the Danish West Indies. That warning no doubt put the Danes into a bargaining mood and led to the negotiation of an acquisition treaty in August 1916. The Senate ratified the agreement the following year and authorized the payment of $25 million for the new possessions.

    The U.S. Virgin Islands, as they came to be known, occupy a strategic location on the Anegada Passage, a prime-shipping lane leading to the Panama Canal. St. Croix, St. John and St. Thomas (site of one of the best deep-water ports in the Caribbean) are the largest of the U.S. islands.


    The Panama Railroads

    The Panama railroad was completed in 1851, and transported millions of dollars worth of gold and other riches from one sea to the next. The labor force had many similarities to the workforce that build the Panama Canal. The Canal could not have been built without the railroads.

    Not to mention, one can go back as far as Panama's first link which includes African slavery in which many of these slaves escaped and formed rebel communities of Cimarron’s (Maroons) in the eastern mountains. They were led by the "Black King" Bayano. He defied the authority of the Spanish and collaborated with English pirates against them.






    http://www.trainweb.org/panama/history1.html








    Source:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/society...llery_01.shtml
    http://www1.union.edu/~melvillj/proj...er/project.htm
    http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1064.html
    http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/afburn...rop/Panama.htm
    Check out the facts of Panama Railroad
    http://www.trainweb.org/panama/facts.html[/QUOTE]

  5. #35
    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    Panama was once a province of Columbia...

    During the early 1900 rebels of the province wanted independence from Columbia.

    To thier luck the US was interested in creating a one ocean navy and to do so they need to build a canal.

    They chose Panama over Nicaragua because
    1. They could obtain equipment from a French company that failed in building the canl

    2. They found the route in Panama to much more feasible because Panama had longer rivers, while Nicaragua was more constituted of Lakes.

    So the rebels used the US's interested at thier benefit to become independent. They fought harder for thier independence while US warships :2eek: watched from the shores! :laugh:

    And U know Columbians weren't gonna phuck with the US!

    THAT IS AN Canalero INTERPRETATION. ALL FACTS by the way.


    In 1899 the US Congress created an Isthmian Canal Commission to examine the possibilities of a Central American canal and to recommend a route. The commission first decided on a route through Nicaragua, but later reversed its decision. The Lesseps company offered its assets to the United States at a price of $40 million. The United States and the new state of Panama signed the Hay-Bunau-Varilla treaty, by which the United States guaranteed the independence of Panama and secured a perpetual lease on a 10-mile strip for the canal. Panama was to be compensated by an initial payment of $10 million and an annuity of $250,000, beginning in 1913. This strip is now known as the Canal Zone.

  6. #36
    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    Rio Abajo is a part of Panama City. Panama City is the capital of The Republic of Panama Panama. English-based Rio Abajo Creole is spoken here. A similar Creole is spoken in Bocas del Toro. Many residents of Rio Abajo are of Jamaican and Barbadian descent. Rio Abajo also is a name of a river flowing in Panama City. Rio Abajo Creole is a linguistic variety spoken in Rio Abajo in Panama City, the capital of Panama. Rio Abajo Creole is no language of its own, but similar to varieties such as Limón Coastal Creole. The number of speakers of Rio Abajo Creole is below 100,000. Rio Abajo Creole does not have the status of an official language
    Limón Coastal Creole is a language spoken in Limón province of Costa Rica. Limón Coastal Creole is similar to varieties such as Colón Creole, Mískito Coastal Creole, and San Andrés and Providencia Creole. The number of speakers of Limón Coastal Creole is below 100,000[1]. Limón Coastal Creole does not have the status of an official language.

    The Afro-Antilleans are descendants of English-speaking black immigrants from Caribbean islands: Barbados, Jamaica, and French-speaking blacks from the French Antilles who arrived in Panama as a consequence of various foreign ventures: the building of a trans-isthmian railroad in 1850, the French attempt at digging an interoceanic canal in 1880, the American construction of the canal in 1904 and the development in Bocas del Toro of the banana industry by the United Fruit Company in the last decades of the 19th century; and of course, there were other people from the other Islands.

    After the canal was built, more Jamaicans and Barbadians came, they worked in the town sites of the Canal Zone, as school teachers, hospital attendants, and technicians, also in the clubhouses, etc. The town sites of some of the Antilleans moved into Panama City, where they started their own churches, schools, baker shops, tailor shops, and drugstores. They socialized in lodges, formed clubs, danced Quadrille and at the Bars. Areas as Marañón, Calidonia, Gauchapil were their residences. Then, they extended into Rio Abajo, (longev hometown) Juan Díaz, Pueblo Nuevo etc. In Colon, they lived from 2nd Street to 16th Street, which included the famous "Bamboolane".

    Today, many of their descendants are still working with the Panama Canal Commission, and banana plantations.

    They owned businesses like: drugstores, bookstores, etc. Some were schools teachers, doctors, lawyers, dentists, entertainers, etc.

  7. #37
    Smarty Skirt Antigua Me Come Fram's Avatar Antigua Me Come Fram is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canalero View Post
    Panama is a mixing bowl of people of different ethnic backgrounds.

    Its unique and different from any other country that also has mixture of races...

    To better understand Panama you must understand its history to understand the dynamics of the culture today.

    Panama is a Central American nation with the strongest historical links to Africa and the Caribbean. The first link comes from the long history of African slavery in Panama, although the number of slaves was small by comparison to Caribbean plantations.

    The second link and the most important comes from the thousands of West Indian immigrants.

    These peoples came for the building of the Panama railroad, canal and Banana Company (Chiriqui), giving way to the modern Panamanian working class.


    THE PANAMA CANAL

    Most of the Canal's workforce during the US construction period in the early 20th century arrived in Panama from the West Indies, on board the steamship Cristobal.

    However, the Caribbean governments were reluctant to allow recruiting, because at the end of the French period of construction, many of the West Indian laborers had been stranded in Panama, and they had to be repatriated at their governments' expense.

    The Barbados government finally agreed to large-scale recruitment, however, and eventually there were some 19,900 Barbadian laborers working on the Canal project. This was reportedly some 10 per cent of the population of Barbados, and nearly 40 per cent of the island's adult men. Later, workers were also recruited from Martinique and Guadeloupe.

    Jamaica refused to allow any recruiting, (SCHEUUUUUUUUUUUPPPPS) and placed a tax of one pound sterling on anyone wishing to work in Panama. This meant that the Jamaican workers in Panama were mostly skilled workers, as only they could afford the tax.At its peak in 1913, the workforce consisted of 44,000 persons.
    West Indian workers were the canal's unsung heroes. Each day, 200 trainloads of dirt had to be hauled away. More than 25,000 worked as canal diggers--three times the number of American who worked on the canal. Between 1904 and 1915, 5,600 lives were lost to disease and accidents. Most of those who died were from Barbados.



    Just like everywhere else in turn of the century America, there was race separation on the canal. The vast majority of the labor came from Latin America, mainly from Barbados. These workers were paid 10 cents an hour for a 10 hour day 6 days a week, and given no special living arrangements. They were the labor, the men in the pits digging with their own brute strength. They were paid in silver. The white Americans, on the other hand, were paid in gold. They were the teachers, nurses, doctors, steam shovel and the train drivers, and engineers. Less than ten percent of the total workforce was American.http://www1.union.edu/~melvillj/proj...er/project.htm

    People do not realize the significance the Canal played in the history of the Caribbean

    One example's include the Virgin Islands:Construction of the Panama Canal and the rise of German naval strength induced the U.S. government to consider the islands' importance again. Word was conveyed to the Danes that if Germany gave any indication of activity in the Caribbean, the U.S. would immediately seize the Danish West Indies. That warning no doubt put the Danes into a bargaining mood and led to the negotiation of an acquisition treaty in August 1916. The Senate ratified the agreement the following year and authorized the payment of $25 million for the new possessions.

    The U.S. Virgin Islands, as they came to be known, occupy a strategic location on the Anegada Passage, a prime-shipping lane leading to the Panama Canal. St. Croix, St. John and St. Thomas (site of one of the best deep-water ports in the Caribbean) are the largest of the U.S. islands.


    The Panama Railroads

    The Panama railroad was completed in 1851, and transported millions of dollars worth of gold and other riches from one sea to the next. The labor force had many similarities to the workforce that build the Panama Canal. The Canal could not have been built without the railroads.

    Not to mention, one can go back as far as Panama's first link which includes African slavery in which many of these slaves escaped and formed rebel communities of Cimarron’s (Maroons) in the eastern mountains. They were led by the "Black King" Bayano. He defied the authority of the Spanish and collaborated with English pirates against them.






    http://www.trainweb.org/panama/history1.html








    Source:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/society...llery_01.shtml
    http://www1.union.edu/~melvillj/proj...er/project.htm
    http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1064.html
    http://www.clas.ufl.edu/users/afburn...rop/Panama.htm
    Check out the facts of Panama Railroad
    http://www.trainweb.org/panama/facts.html
    [/QUOTE]

    WOW!!! Thanks for all the info. I covered some of this in HS history class but not in much detail. I don't remember studying anything about the railroad and the rebellions. Thanks. By the way can you give me some info on Noriega? I remember hearing a lot about him in the 80's.

  8. #38
    ah like chupidness limintrinibwoy's Avatar limintrinibwoy is offline
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    That's great stuff...panamanians have always been a special people to me...meh granny (3rd grandmother) was jamaican by birth and migrated to panama when she was young...and she grew up in panama its a lovely place i went with them..had a ball

  9. #39
    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    WOW!!! Thanks for all the info. I covered some of this in HS history class but not in much detail. I don't remember studying anything about the railroad and the rebellions. Thanks. By the way can you give me some info on Noriega? I remember hearing a lot about him in the 80's.[/QUOTE]


    Hmmm. interesting that you asked

    Democracy Now: 1989 invasion of Panama used as a model for the invasion of IRAQ
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...q=panama&hl=en


    Plenty about Noriega

  10. #40
    Pana Bad Boy Longev's Avatar Longev is offline
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    damn boy you kill dem wif the info.......

    you took the words out my mouth....lol

  11. #41
    AKA Dimeout Drinks4Life's Avatar Drinks4Life is offline
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    check check

  12. #42
    Pana Bad Boy Longev's Avatar Longev is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canalero View Post
    t Then, they extended into Rio Abajo, (Longev hometown) Juan Díaz, Pueblo Nuevo etc. In Colon, they lived from 2nd Street to 16th Street, which included the famous "Bamboolane".


    yeah we just mess up the english and make up our own damn words......

    Que Sopa......lol

    I need to find the Panamanian Dictionary and post some of the words......*Canal boy a find dat for me no......lol*

  13. #43
    AKA Dimeout Drinks4Life's Avatar Drinks4Life is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Longev View Post
    yeah we just mess up the english and make up our own damn words......

    Que Sopa......lol

    I need to find the Panamanian Dictionary and post some of the words......*Canal boy a find dat for me no......lol*

  14. #44
    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    Registered User Canalero is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by hellokitty View Post
    Yeah Panama has another set of Blacks. They are strictly Panamanian. They speak no English and the look down at the Panamanians who are of West Indian Descent. They usually live along the coast.
    My Mother's side of family is from Trinidad. My great-grandfather came to Panama to help build the Canal. My Father's side of family is from Jamaica. My paternal grandparents speak no Spanish. They refuse to learn the language because they did not want to lose the West Indian culture.
    The best time to go to Panama is for Christmas. It is very very nice. Panama is a beautiful country. It is very similar to Trinidad. The people are very laid back and they love to Party.


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