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Thread: Jagdeo acquired more wealth in office than any other Guyanese President – AFC Chairma

  1. #46
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by kidray View Post
    @SWAGGERIFIC

    You are just mad because I exposed you for being a stupid CVnt.This is not a barber shop hoss,U have not provided me with no piece of credible documentation.I feel bad for U.U cannot disputed the UWI articule and the news day Article.

    Indians were given a Jump start,Africans were left with nothing.What other than favoritism can you call that? policy? please
    u r a joke, u cannot make any summary u want to make when the info is not there to prove that conclusion. Again when I have time I will school u on why Trinidad Blacks had an advantage but throw it into the wind.

    dont know bout Guyana.
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  2. #47
    Registered User kidray is offline
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    @SWAGGERIFIC

    But they were freed with nothing. Everyone knows that Britain sweetened the pill of emancipation by awarding an outright grant—not a loan—of 20 million pounds (a huge sum in
    1834) to the former owners as compensation for the loss of their property—just as the state must pay you if it takes your land to build a road (or a sports facility). Except for a tiny handful of abolitionists, no-one suggested that the freed people deserved any compensation in cash or land. They should just be grateful for the ‘boon’ of freedom. So emancipation came with no money, no land, no loans, no education. And the structures of planter control and white power


    The above is cutout from a UWI Article from Some of the Smartest minds in the Caribbean.


    The slaves were free why were'nt they treated just like the former owners?

    Why did just a few abolitionists suggest slaves should be compensated?Why did the other reject the idea ?


    You read what you want to read and strategically ignore prime info

  3. #48
    NaturalBornRidah
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    @kidray

    How many black indentured laborers came from Africa to guyana after abolishing of slavery.U said that there was just as many black indentured laborers going to TNT as Indian IL

    Not to sure ,around 60,000 maybe probably twice as much as TnT, but the difference was there was already a sizeable black population Guyana ,GT was legitimately sugar producing colony whos population made of been on par with Barbados during the colonial 1800s.

    Would you say that black people in Trinidad were at a disadvantage vs Indian people.

    Blacks in Trinidad faced their hardship of course, but they did not have a hardship as bad as other blacks in the West Indian countries, if it wasn't so there would not of been that much blacks migrating to TnT in the first place. Blacks did migrate to Guyana from other islands but not en masse as TnT, Guyana also had a tough reputation for survival. After slavery there were many laws to help keep blacks as convicts or criminals, in return for their arrest they would have to work the land, this wasn't the case in TnT.



    Do think historical in Guyana and TNT Slave masters had Resented African because they felt that slavery abolishing destroyed their plans?


    This is what I am trying to tell you my friend, the reason why Trinidad arose to such prominence is because its market and plantations were based in curballing other emancipated slaves on other islands from buying up land and free estates.



    Do you think that Indians owning more land than blacks in any shape or fashion goes back to colonial days.


    Indians inherited the land by whites in Guyana after many blacks went on to work for bauxite companies , at first there were many blacks in GT who started to own free villages such as Buxton ,Victoria, and other villages. And over time blacks did gain ownership of some farming grounds, but the crop production and crops themselves weren't sufficient enough to outsell some of the white owned farms there. There was even a new kind of sugar cane production method being developed by the british, and overall blacks could not keep up the new indentured servants and Maiderian Portuguese coming there opening shops.

    More over,it was very difficult to even farm in Guyana(probably the hardest in the western world),the land is fertile but since most of the population lived below sea level massive construction tasks had to be developed to get canals and trenches to these locations. So since the Dutch had previous knowledge on working on land below sea level , blacks in Guyana couldn't just go anywhere and farm(at least on the East Coast of it), unlike the blacks in TnT.





    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    WRONG! lol, you guys keep making faulty statements, I only have to laugh. There were never as much Black indentured servants as Indians, we had around 117,000 Indentured Indians come to Trinidad from 1845-1917, a lot of the Blacks who migrated from the islands did not come to work on the plantations but in the oil fields, civil service, teaching service etc. Yes some worked on the plantation post slavery but to say the same amount of Blacks came as indentured as Indians is a misleading statement.

    We also had some indentured Blacks coming from Sierra Leone and other parts of Africa, but the numbers for that period does not add up to the East Indian numbers.
    WRONG, there were indeed many black indentured servants coming to TNT the fact is that Trinidad's massive Black Influx compensated for the massive East Indian influx.

    It was Venezuleans who worked on the oil fields , so I know you are being misleading.

    If there 117,000 Indians they would of outnumbered the blacks in TNT 4 to 1 a long time ago, in Guyana they had more blacks living there before emancipation and now there is more Indians living there than blacks today

    Don't sit here and act like you guys just had a population boom because you guys started screwing crazy during the late 1800s, I've already showed this to you , your population was insignifcant compared to other islands during slavery.

    Regardless many blacks wouldn't of came if it was so easy.

  4. #49
    Registered User Seawall's Avatar Seawall is offline
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    A letter from one of the country's newspapers.

    Georgetown may very well be Caricom’s most unattractive capital
    By STABROEK STAFF

    Dear Editor,

    The trash and filthy drain around Guyana’s Parliament epitomizes the state of Georgetown, and one can safely say Guyana – a nation plagued by corruption at all levels, with a bureaucracy that makes the nation crawl, and a political system that totally centralizes power in a country that still awaits the implementation of local elections.

    I never expected to see such filth around Parliament. This should be the centerpiece of the city. Imagine what impression foreigners have of Guyana seeing this, and yet we hear much rhetoric about tourism. Those who talk about Guyana’s tourism potential are in dreamland. They need to go just across the border, to Paramaribo and look at that ornate capital where colonial buildings and homes are preserved in a city that is clean and attractive, and is undergoing major rehabilitation of the waterfront and surrounding areas. Sadly, in Guyana the waterfront on longer exists, squatters are everywhere, real estate deals are dodgy and the seawall is the new party spot where heaps of rubbish is left after the bacchanal. Georgetown may very well be Caricom’s most unattractive capital.

    Guyanese are saying that the country has become the paradise of thieves and squatters and is devoid of law and order. When there is blatant corruption and those in authority themselves don’t abide by the law, then the people will do as they please and they are doing just that. And this has been the case since 1966 and has accelerated in the past decade to an unprecedented level.

    Georgetown and its surroundings are developing haphazardly. Ugly buildings, housing schemes and shopping centres (malls) are popping up everywhere in a city that seems to have no urban development plan, and these have caused major stress. Take, for example, the four-lane highway that is being built from the airport to Georgetown; there isn’t enough land to build the highway. Who gave developers permission to build housing there and why were squatters not removed decades ago? Further, the highway that Kuwait was supposed to fund can’t be executed since 200 hundred homes have been built there by squatters, and the government is complaining that it does not have eight million dollars to relocate them. For the same reason, the Georgetown-Timehri Highway expansion is being stalled owing to squatters and developers everywhere. In addition, squatters have stalled the modernization and expansion of Guyana’s Cheddi Jagan International Airport.

    Where is the urban plan for Georgetown, or is it just a paper tiger? The city can’t cope with housing developments on both sides of the Demerara River; it has led to a tremendous increase in traffic on the bridge, traffic congestion around the Demerara Harbour Bridge area and the city at large; sewage backup, rubbish, pollution, and an increase in traffic and congestion in Georgetown‘s centre. The bridge was not built 30 years ago for such stress. And yet, those in authority are allowing developers to build new housing and shopping centres in the city without considering the aesthetic character of Georgetown and the environmental impact. Has the public seen the plan for these new malls? Do they look like a garage as some suggest?
    Moreover, take a look at Main Street, Georgetown. Most of the colonial buildings have been destroyed and slabs of concrete and glass are going up. This should have been the centerpiece of Georgetown. This is not sustainable development. This is not economic development. Economic development is good but what sort of jobs are being offered and how many jobs?

    Yours faithfully,
    Raymond Chickrie
    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

    “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters.” Frederick Douglass

  5. #50
    Registered User sweetntang's Avatar sweetntang is offline
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    What I don't get with these pfficial members, is why not just let the ppl run themselves,w hile dem set up dem gambling shop anyweh them want.

    Yuh can drive pass innah yuh nice car a evening time and si poor yutes, and nuh feel nuh way seh yuh a teef money an itch it inna yuh brief?

    How dem sleep sah.



    Yaweh forgive and have mercy plz.

  6. #51
    Registered User Sankat's Avatar Sankat is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by NaturalBornRidah View Post
    @kidray


    Indians inherited the land by whites in Guyana after many blacks went on to work for bauxite companies , at first there were many blacks in GT who started to own free villages such as Buxton ,Victoria, and other villages. And over time blacks did gain ownership of some farming grounds, but the crop production and crops themselves weren't sufficient enough to outsell some of the white owned farms there. There was even a new kind of sugar cane production method being developed by the british, and overall blacks could not keep up the new indentured servants and Maiderian Portuguese coming there opening shops.

    More over,it was very difficult to even farm in Guyana(probably the hardest in the western world),the land is fertile but since most of the population lived below sea level massive construction tasks had to be developed to get canals and trenches to these locations. So since the Dutch had previous knowledge on working on land below sea level , blacks in Guyana couldn't just go anywhere and farm(at least on the East Coast of it), unlike the blacks in TnT.



    .
    I really don't have time to respond to personal attacks (see mafia post by Seawall) and posts which are one-sided (again Seawall that the WPA was founded only by Africans.) You have seriously been brainwashed to believe untruths and apparently believe that only your viewpoint is valid and all other are 'infiltrators'.

    I will say as I said before Guyana has some way to go.

    However I will respond to the quote above:

    Which Indians were given a jumpstart? Many Indians planted rice as a means of earning a living after indentureship. They would RENT lands from the British and plant rice in their spare time. The British did not want to give them land (and they certainly did NOT inherit land from the British) but they knew Indians would move away from the sugar estates if they were not allowed to rent the lands and since they needed the cheap labour (after Emancipation only 30% of Africans remained on the estates as labourers- mostly in the lower echelons of management such as overseers.) Most Africans went to the cities to earn their wages away from farming. Indians had to repatriate to India at their OWN expense unless they served a 10 year period. To induce them to stay they were given a stipend in lieu of the trip. Many Indians used that money to BUY land or they were offered land instead since they did well in their farming endeavours. My ancestors BOUGHT land paid for with cash- that I know as a fact.


    Additionally, the National Cultural Center in Guyana was built using the repatriation funds earned by Indian labour.

    A good weekend to all of you.
    SWAGGERIFIC likes this.

  7. #52
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sankat View Post
    I really don't have time to respond to personal attacks (see mafia post by Seawall) and posts which are one-sided (again Seawall that the WPA was founded only by Africans.) You have seriously been brainwashed to believe untruths and apparently believe that only your viewpoint is valid and all other are 'infiltrators'.

    I will say as I said before Guyana has some way to go.

    However I will respond to the quote above:

    Which Indians were given a jumpstart? Many Indians planted rice as a means of earning a living after indentureship. They would RENT lands from the British and plant rice in their spare time. The British did not want to give them land (and they certainly did NOT inherit land from the British) but they knew Indians would move away from the sugar estates if they were not allowed to rent the lands and since they needed the cheap labour (after Emancipation only 30% of Africans remained on the estates as labourers- mostly in the lower echelons of management such as overseers.) Most Africans went to the cities to earn their wages away from farming. Indians had to repatriate to India at their OWN expense unless they served a 10 year period. To induce them to stay they were given a stipend in lieu of the trip. Many Indians used that money to BUY land or they were offered land instead since they did well in their farming endeavours. My ancestors BOUGHT land paid for with cash- that I know as a fact.


    Additionally, the National Cultural Center in Guyana was built using the repatriation funds earned by Indian labour.

    A good weekend to all of you.
    when I gather the strength to deal with these two lunatics I will make a rebuttal
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  8. #53
    Registered User Sankat's Avatar Sankat is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    when I gather the strength to deal with these two lunatics I will make a rebuttal
    Is really a big time waste. Sad thing is both peoples suffered much but with these 'centric' mentalities we will never see the common bond in the suffering our ancestors endured and try to build a nation where we can all enjoy without viewing people as 'other'. Instead the goal seems to be to pass blame and try and pull the 'other' down. I already get labelled twice but it doan bodda me one bit.

  9. #54
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by NaturalBornRidah View Post
    @kidray

    How many black indentured laborers came from Africa to guyana after abolishing of slavery.U said that there was just as many black indentured laborers going to TNT as Indian IL

    Not to sure ,around 60,000 maybe probably twice as much as TnT, but the difference was there was already a sizeable black population Guyana ,GT was legitimately sugar producing colony whos population made of been on par with Barbados during the colonial 1800s.

    Would you say that black people in Trinidad were at a disadvantage vs Indian people.

    Blacks in Trinidad faced their hardship of course, but they did not have a hardship as bad as other blacks in the West Indian countries, if it wasn't so there would not of been that much blacks migrating to TnT in the first place. Blacks did migrate to Guyana from other islands but not en masse as TnT, Guyana also had a tough reputation for survival. After slavery there were many laws to help keep blacks as convicts or criminals, in return for their arrest they would have to work the land, this wasn't the case in TnT.



    Do think historical in Guyana and TNT Slave masters had Resented African because they felt that slavery abolishing destroyed their plans?


    This is what I am trying to tell you my friend, the reason why Trinidad arose to such prominence is because its market and plantations were based in curballing other emancipated slaves on other islands from buying up land and free estates.



    Do you think that Indians owning more land than blacks in any shape or fashion goes back to colonial days.


    Indians inherited the land by whites in Guyana after many blacks went on to work for bauxite companies , at first there were many blacks in GT who started to own free villages such as Buxton ,Victoria, and other villages. And over time blacks did gain ownership of some farming grounds, but the crop production and crops themselves weren't sufficient enough to outsell some of the white owned farms there. There was even a new kind of sugar cane production method being developed by the british, and overall blacks could not keep up the new indentured servants and Maiderian Portuguese coming there opening shops.

    More over,it was very difficult to even farm in Guyana(probably the hardest in the western world),the land is fertile but since most of the population lived below sea level massive construction tasks had to be developed to get canals and trenches to these locations. So since the Dutch had previous knowledge on working on land below sea level , blacks in Guyana couldn't just go anywhere and farm(at least on the East Coast of it), unlike the blacks in TnT.







    WRONG, there were indeed many black indentured servants coming to TNT the fact is that Trinidad's massive Black Influx compensated for the massive East Indian influx.

    It was Venezuleans who worked on the oil fields , so I know you are being misleading.

    If there 117,000 Indians they would of outnumbered the blacks in TNT 4 to 1 a long time ago, in Guyana they had more blacks living there before emancipation and now there is more Indians living there than blacks today

    Don't sit here and act like you guys just had a population boom because you guys started screwing crazy during the late 1800s, I've already showed this to you , your population was insignifcant compared to other islands during slavery.

    Regardless many blacks wouldn't of came if it was so easy.
    ok, Guyana did not have a sizeable Black population at all, especially considering their land mass and farming potential, they may have had more numbers than Trinidad, but dont try to spread a lie, Guyana still was lacking labor that is why they sent to India for the Indians.
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  10. #55
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    This effort to somehow prove the British preference for East Indians over Africans in the Caribbean is far from the truth. The proponents of this argument cannot and have not provided any evidence to substantiate their claims.

    In Trinidad, while the Indians were on the canefields, a large number of the African population was taking up jobs in the civil service, enrolled in larger numbers in schools. The culture of Trinidad was also more or less dominated by the Afro Creole interest, leaving out the development of the East Indian interest until recently.

    This so call jumpstart is a fallacy.
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  11. #56
    NaturalBornRidah
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sankat View Post
    I really don't have time to respond to personal attacks (see mafia post by Seawall) and posts which are one-sided (again Seawall that the WPA was founded only by Africans.) You have seriously been brainwashed to believe untruths and apparently believe that only your viewpoint is valid and all other are 'infiltrators'.

    I will say as I said before Guyana has some way to go.

    However I will respond to the quote above:

    Which Indians were given a jumpstart? Many Indians planted rice as a means of earning a living after indentureship. They would RENT lands from the British and plant rice in their spare time. The British did not want to give them land (and they certainly did NOT inherit land from the British) but they knew Indians would move away from the sugar estates if they were not allowed to rent the lands and since they needed the cheap labour (after Emancipation only 30% of Africans remained on the estates as labourers- mostly in the lower echelons of management such as overseers.) Most Africans went to the cities to earn their wages away from farming. Indians had to repatriate to India at their OWN expense unless they served a 10 year period. To induce them to stay they were given a stipend in lieu of the trip. Many Indians used that money to BUY land or they were offered land instead since they did well in their farming endeavours. My ancestors BOUGHT land paid for with cash- that I know as a fact.


    Additionally, the National Cultural Center in Guyana was built using the repatriation funds earned by Indian labour.

    A good weekend to all of you.
    What do you think I meant by black laborers on estates having their crops outsold by their contemporaries.
    Indians were not chased down or prone to get arrested as convicts so they can be indentured laborers as blacks were in Guyana during the post emancipation years.

    Blacks did buy the land and thats why many of them were in free villages.

    The point is many British whites and owners of farms would rather hire a group of Indian indentured servants than Black Laborer gangs.


    Who told you blacks went to cities as laborers only, isn't Anns Groove,Golden Grove,Enmore, etc villages were blacks used the black lands to labor and plant their crops.

  12. #57
    NaturalBornRidah
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    ok, Guyana did not have a sizeable Black population at all, especially considering their land mass and farming potential, they may have had more numbers than Trinidad, but dont try to spread a lie, Guyana still was lacking labor that is why they sent to India for the Indians.
    Listen boy, don't play games with me I already showed you the numbers of blacks in trinidad post emancipation era, Guyana produced sugar cane sufficient enough for British to send laborers over there en masse and we had a population equivalent to that of Grenada and maybe even Barbados at the time.

  13. #58
    NaturalBornRidah
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    54. THE VILLAGE MOVEMENT


    THE VILLAGE MOVEMENT

    Immediately after Emancipation the European planters and the Government took a decision not to sell land to the free Africans. The general aim was to ensure that the Africans continued to be a source of labour on the plantations.

    But economic circumstances forced the planters, shortly after, to change their position. Many cotton plantations in particular became unprofitable by 1838 because Britain began to purchase cheaper cotton from the United States where there were very large cotton plantations which used African slave labour. The smaller cotton plantations in Guyana could not survive in such a situation and some of them were abandoned. The owner of Plantation Northbrook, a cotton plantation on the East Coast Demerara, decided to sell it to a group of 83 Africans for 30,000 guilders, equivalent to 2000 British pounds or $10,000. These Africans, like many others, had saved money that they had earned from over-time work over the years. They were mainly headmen and mechanics from Grove, Paradise, Hope and Enmore; and since much of the money they had saved was in the form of coins, they had to transport the payment in wheel-barrows to the seller.

    Shortly after, Queen Victoria agreed to a request from the new owners to rename the plantation Victoria, in her honour.

    By 1839, Africans purchased plantations of Lichfield, Golden Grove, St. John and Providence in West Berbice. Lichfield was bought by one person, Cudjoe Mc Pherson for $3000, and he later divided the plantation into 12 sections which he sold to other Africans for a profit.

    By this time the planters realised that many Africans had accumulated much savings, so they immediately raised land prices. When 61 Africans bought Beterverwagting, a plantation smaller than Northbrook, they had to pay $22,000 for it. New Orange Nassau, a plantation of 800 acres, was purchased by 128 persons for $50,000 in 1840 and it was renamed Buxton in honour of Thomas Buxton who championed the cause of Emancipation in the British Parliament. In 1841, another group paid $80,000 for Plantation Friendship, located next to Buxton.

    Some planters used other methods to make quick money by selling portions of their estates to African labourers. On the Essequibo Coast, for instance, the owners of Dageraad, Mocha and Westfield divided the front lands into lots and sold them for $100 to $200 each. Soon, a thriving "proprietary" village of Africans developed in that area and was named Queenstown in honour of Queen Victoria. In the same manner, the front lands of Plantation Aberdeen were divided and sold to Africans who established the village of Williamstown. In a very short time, other "proprietary" villages were established throughout the coast of Guyana.

    In 1840, the White sugar plantation owners decided to reduce the wages for African field and factory labourers. They claimed that they had to do so because the export price per ton of sugar had dropped below the cost of production. The owners also discontinued the allowances of food and medicine to the workers, most of whom had continued to live on the plantations. To deprive the workers of other forms of subsistence and to force them to accept the lower wages, they also prevented them from fishing in the canals, and destroyed their pigs and chopped down the fruit trees growing on their small cultivation plots. If the African labourers did not comply meekly to this new situation, they were expelled from estates.

    In response to these developments, the African workers on the Demerara and Essequibo estates went on strike from January to March. This strike greatly affected sugar production, since the indentured Indian, Portuguese and other imported African labourers were still insufficient to handle all the work.

    The Africans were of the view that they had no economic future if they continued to reside on the sugar plantations. They were seeing other Africans buying up the abandoned cotton plantations, and they felt that they too must acquire their own land. During the period of the strike, 65 of them pooled their savings and purchased Plaisance for $39,000. The estates of Peter's Hall, Farm and Garden of Eden on the East Bank Demerara, and Danielstown and Bush Lot on the Essequibo Coast were also acquired in 1840 by groups of Africans.

    Another strike in December 1847 to protest another cut in wages, forced more Africans to abandon the sugar estates. Some of them moved to the existing villages while others who had no savings squatted on Crown lands.

    The moving away of Africans from the estates placed added pressures on sugar production and the planters used devious means to force them to return to work there. One of these means was to let loose water from the estate canals to flood the nearby African villages. The planters, no doubt, felt that if the Africans' farms were damaged, they would return to the estates to work.

    The African villages also faced administrative problems during the 1840s. The shareholders, or proprietors, possessed no experience in cooperative management, and since they used up their savings to purchase land, they had nothing left for maintaining the roads, bridges, sluice gates, and drainage canals. As a result, the conditions of the villages and the communal plantations deteriorated.

    The land buying by Africans continued until 1852. There were at this period over 82,000 Africans of working age and roughly half of them lived in villages and worked from time to time on the estates. By that time, too, Africans had established 25 villages on lands that they purchased for over one million dollars. Africans also owned over 2000 freehold properties.

  14. #59
    Registered User Sankat's Avatar Sankat is offline
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    [QUOTE=NaturalBornRidah;4311031]What do you think I meant by black laborers on estates having their crops outsold by their contemporaries.
    Indians were not chased down or prone to get arrested as convicts so they can be indentured laborers as blacks were in Guyana during the post emancipation years.

    No, Indians were bound to the estate which meant that if they left the estate and didn't have a pass they were thrown in jail which frequuently occured as managers did not want to issue passes to Indians and this kept on occuring even after their indentureship was over. Africans were allowed to leave the estate at will.

    Blacks did buy the land and thats why many of them were in free villages.

    The point is many British whites and owners of farms would rather hire a group of Indian indentured servants than Black Laborer gangs.

    Do you know why? The Indians were contractually bound to the British whites. As in slavery, the had no out save to escape to the bushes with death being the consequence. It wasn't a matter of racial preference. It was a matter of their labour being much much cheaper than what Africans (rightfully) demanded as payment.

    Who told you blacks went to cities as laborers only, isn't Anns Groove,Golden Grove,Enmore, etc villages were blacks used the black lands to labor and plant their crops.

    Now where did I say Africans ONLY went to the cities as labourers?[/QUOTE]

  15. #60
    Registered User kidray is offline
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    @Sankat

    After Emancipation Abolitionist had a choose to compensate African slaves for their suffering as "Slaves" Only a tiny few even considered the idea.Money was paid out to the Plantation owners for"Loss of there property(SLAVES)

    Africans were not given nothing instead comments were made saying that they should be lucky they were"Boon of Freedom"

    I urge any one to provide me with proof that after abolition Plantation owners did not have a vendetta against Blacks?

    Indians were paid for their Indenture-ship ,Why were blacks not compensated for their sufferings.That is one of the points the "Credible News day article states makes.

    http://www.newsday.co.tt/commentary/0,165498.html

    Can any provide me with proof that land was not sold at higher prices intentional to Africans.

    The catholic Church justified slavery against black at one point by saying"Blacks are the children of Ham"

    Britain did not live up to it's "so called " commitments.

    Indians were given preference over black in land ownership and it's pricing.

    If the British had compensated slaves for their sufferings then one can begin to say that Indians and black were at even.

    British policy stated "If the state caused any inconvenience(Property,investments or so on)A free man must be compensated.The Former slave owners were free men they were compensated.Why were the slaves not compensated (Were they not free)afterall one can argue and say"Time as slaves" is a investment"they invested time"

    That policy blatantly over looked the sufferings of slaves,but I didn't overlook the need of Indians to get paid.

    Darker complexions were seen as being less superior "We dont want those Negros who want more money to do the job that Indians do for less to get good land"Because of them we have to pay Indians to do the just for Money(rather before labour was free)" this is a general notion they had.Indians had a much much better change of getting quality land cheaper and less resistantly.

    what other then a "Jump start can you call this" when the so called Policy overlook Africans.

    we must not allow emotions to prevail over principle.

    A lot of indian and white folk try to desensitize the levels of suffers of Africans,there is a motive for this

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