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Thread: fufu, mofongo, ugali, similarities beetwen Africa, South america and Caribbean

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    fufu, mofongo, ugali, similarities beetwen Africa, South america and Caribbean

    The African slave brought much practice cooking. There are many similarities between African cuisine Afro caribbean and Afro Latin.


    1.FUFU. foufou or foofoo

    It is a thick paste usually made by boiling starchy root vegetables in water and pounding with a mortar and pestle until the desired consistency is reached.

    Fufu originated from Ghana, where it is pronounced "fufuo". The word fufu comes from the Twi language. It is eaten with light (tomato) soup, palm nut soup, groundnut (peanut)-abenkwan (palm nut) soup or other types of soups with vegetables such as nkontomire (cocoyam leaves). Soups are often made with different kinds of meat and fish, fresh or smoked. Fufu is basically pounded cassava or pounded yam pounded together with plantain. It is eaten with agussi soup or stew in Ghana and in the Northeast of Brundi.
    Fufu is actually originally from Ghana from the Asante ethnic group.[citation needed] Settlers and migrants from India, Togo and Ivory Coast discovered it and modified it in their accord. The word 'fufu' has two possible derivations[dubious – discuss], both deriving from words in the Asante language (asante twi). White, fufuoop (silent p)[dubious – discuss], is the colour of prepared fufu.[citation needed]; pounding, fu-fu, is the process used to produce it[citation needed].


    fufu is called:
    - Ugali in east africa
    - Fufu also in Central Africa (Democratic Republic of Congo)
    - Nshima nsima gold-gold in Zambia and Malawi Bidia
    - Sadza in zimbabwe
    - Pap in south africa
    - Mofongo in Puerto Rico
    - Mangu in Dominican Republic

    - .........

    yam fufu (west africa)




    2 lb yams 1/4 tsp black pepper 1/4 tsp salt 1 tsp butter

    1. Place the yams in cold, unsalted water, bring to a full boil, and cook

    25 minutes, or until soft.

    2. Remove the yams, cook, and peel. Mash with the other ingredients.

    3. Place in a food processor, and run briefly to remove lumps. DO NOT

    PUREE! (If a processor is not available, go directly to step 4.)

    4. Remove foofoo to a bowl, and beat with a wooden spoon or wire

    whisk until smooth. The foofoo should have a sticky, slightly resilient

    consistency.

    5. Shape the foofoo into balls with your hands, and serve warm.







    Plantain fufu

    ghanaian plantain fufu
    :



    ngredients:

    A – 600gr plantain
    B – 200gr Cassava



    Cooking:
    1 – In unsalted boiling water, cook A and B, peeled and sliced for about 15 to 20 minutes.
    2 – Remove the pan from the heat, and let them cool down in the cooking liquid.
    3 – Drain A and grind until smooth and free of any lumps then add B and mash until smooth.


    Fufu de platano (Cuba)





    4 to 6 green plantains (depending on size)
    1/2 cup of pork cracklings
    3 tbsp olive oil
    1 head of garlic minced
    sea salt to taste
    black pepper (optional)

    Cut the plantains in 1/2 inch pieces, leaving the skin on. Place them in a large pot with water to boil until tender, which is when you can easily prick it with a fork. Once tender, remove from heat and run them under cold water for a few minutes to cool them off so that you can peel off the skin. In a bowl, mash the plantains well and slowly add the pork cracklings and salt, mixing them into the mashed plantains.
    In a frying pan saute the garlic and pepper for a few minutes. Pour it over the mashed plantains and serve.

    Mofongo



    . Fry about 6 plantains in oil in batches until golden. Add to a mixer bowl. Throw about 10 diced garlic cloves into the same oil, then add the oil and garlic to the mixer bowl. Mix with the paddle attachment until chunky and starchy. It shouldn't be smooth like mashed potatoes.

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    Matoke or Matooke (Uganda)



    8 -10 plantains
    1 lemon, juice of (optional)
    oil (for frying)
    1 onion , chopped
    2 -3 tomatoes , chopped (or canned whole tomatoes, drained)
    1 green bell pepper , chopped
    3 -4 garlic cloves , crushed
    1 chili pepper , chopped (optional)
    salt or coriander or cayenne pepper (to taste) or red pepper (to taste)
    1 lb ground beef (optional) or 1 lb beef stew meat , cut in bite-sized pieces (optional)


    cup beef broth (optional) or 1 cup beef stock (optional)

    Peel the plantains, cut into cubes, sprinkle with lemon juice, and set aside.

    Heat oil in a large pan. Fry the Onion, tomatoes, green pepper, hot pepper, and garlic together. Add spices to taste. Add meat or broth. Continue frying and stirring until the meat is nearly done or until the broth is starting to boil.

    Reduce heat. Add plantains. Cover and simmer over low heat until plantains are tender and meat is done. Serve matoke (matooke, if you prefer) hot.

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    TomTom (Haiti)



    om Tom
    This dish originates from the South of Haiti.

    There are basically three base for the puree component: Lam Veritab (bread fruit), patat (Batata) and Banan (green plantain).

    In... or batata or Green plantain
    Crabs
    Gombo
    Olive Oil
    Pepper & salt
    Hot pepper (fresh)
    Chopped Oignons
    Thyme
    Finely chopped Parsley & garlic cloves

    Preparation

    1. Take the breadfruit and boil it in salted water.

    (Some people cut it into pieces and remove the heart prior to boiling).

    When it is tender and the water has boiled, take off the skin.

    Mash it in a pounder while you keep dipping the handle of the pounder in the water you used to boil the breadfruit.

    Mash until the breadfruit is pureed.
    2. Cook the crabs (Clean the crabs by rubbing them with a cut lemon.

    Rinse in cold water.) with the gombo, oil, chopped oignons, finely chopped parsley & garlic cloves, thyme, salt & pepper, hot pepper.

    Cook covered until most liquid has evaporated and the mixture starts to color a little bit. Let it simmer (on low fire) until the gombo is tender.

    Do not put tomato paste.
    3. Serve warm.

    In a plate put some pureed breadfruit (depending on the one you cooked) and some of the crabs & gombo.

    This dish is eaten with your hands.

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    Amiwo ( Benin)



    1 whole chicken, washed and jointed 500g cornmeal (ground maize) 600g tomatoes, washed and chopped 100g dried prawns, ground 25ml groundnut oil 3 large onions, finely chopped 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped 2 bell peppers, finely chopped 2 green chillies, finely chopped 2 green chillies, pounded in a mortar 4 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped 2 celery sticks (with green), finely chopped salt and freshly-ground black pepper.


    Add 60ml water to a pan with the parsley, celery, salt and black pepper and two of the garlic cloves. Bring to a simmer, add the chicken pieces and cook for 15 minutes. After this time, heat the groundnut oil in another pan. Remove the chicken pieces from the first pan and fry in the oil until they are golden brown all over. Remove the chicken pieces and set aside to keep warm. Fry 1 onion in the remaining oil until golden (about 8 minutes) then stir in 2/3 of the tomatoes along with 1 garlic clove, the ground prawns and the chillies. Stir in 500ml of water, bring to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. After this time, take 100g of the cornmeal and mix with a little water to form a smooth paste. Pour this into the boiling sauce and stir until you have a smooth slurry. Cover the pan and cook for 15 minutes. Now, stirring constantly, work in the remaining cornmeal. Stirring constantly, continue to cook until the mixture comes together as a paste so stiff that you can no longer stir it. In the meantime, combine the remaining tomatoes, bell peppers and chopped chillies in a pan. Cook gently for about 15 minutes, or until the tomatoes break down into a sauce. Turn the cornmeal paste into the centre of a serving dish. Form a pit in the centre and pour the tomato sauce into this. Surround with the chicken pieces and serve.


    A congolese parody about the Fufu

    "ya ko lia" means ..."come eat!"


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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    Mayi moulin ( haiti) or fungi or Ugali (east africa)or fufu de mais .. mean cornmeal fufu( congo)





    Water -- 4 cups
    Salt -- 2 teaspoons
    White cornmeal, finely ground -- 2 cups
    Method
    Bring the water and salt to a boil in a heavy-bottomed saucepan. Stir in the cornmeal slowly, letting it fall though the fingers of your hand.
    Reduce heat to medium-low and continue stirring regularly, smashing any lumps with a spoon, until the mush pulls away from the sides of the pot and becomes very thick, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and allow to cool somewhat.
    Place the ugali into a large serving bowl. Wet your hands with water, form into a ball and serve.
    Variations
    White cornmeal is the most commonly used grain for ugali. But you can substitute sorghum, millet or coarse cassava flour or even hominy grits.
    More or less water can be added to achieve the consistency you prefer.
    Stir in a little butter if you like for a richer flavor.
    Notes
    Ugali is usually served as an accompaniment to meat or vegetable stews, greens or soured milk. To eat ugali, pull off a small ball of mush with your fingers. Form an indentation with your thumb, and use it to scoop up accompanying stews and other dishes. Or you can form larger balls with your hands or an ice cream scoop, place them in individual serving bowls and spoon stew around them.
    Cornmeal mush is also found in Caribbean creole cuisine and was certainly brought there by imported slaves. On the islands of Curaçao and Aruba it is known as funchi, funjie in the Virgin Islands. In Antigua and Donimica it is called fungi. Haitians make mayi moulin.
    Average:

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    fungeeor coocoo or coucou Antigua and Barbuda, virgin island





    2 cups of corn meal
    6 okras
    4 cups of water
    1 tsp salt

    Ingredients for pepperpot:

    2 cups fresh green peas
    1 lb chopped spinach
    4 fresh green eddo leaves
    1 lb eggplant
    1 lb okras
    ½ lb pumpkin
    1 lb salt beef
    1 lb pigtail
    1 lb green pawpaw
    2 small squash
    1 tbsp salt
    1 tbsp pepper
    2 cloves garlic
    chicken (any amount desired)
    vegetable oil
    2 large onions
    tomato paste to taste
    4 tbsp margarine
    thyme (as desired)

    To Prepare Pepperpot:

    Wash all the chopped vegetable and leaves in water and then leave to soak in fresh water. For about 10 minutes, cook salted meat in water. After heating vegetable oil, add salted meats, then onions and fresh meat and fry for about 15 to 20 minutes on low. Add all other vegetables and enough water to cover and cook them until they are tender. When they are cooked, add the peas and seasonings and allow the pot to simmer on low fire for about 15 minutes until thick.

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    Registered User MR HYPE's Avatar MR HYPE is offline
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    yep..i love fufu

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    SweetfuhDayz agroDOLCE's Avatar agroDOLCE is offline
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    i doh like coucou.

    btw, coucou is also made on other islands apart from antigua and barbuda

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    excellent thread
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    i eat coocoo the other day from my best friend mom, tasted good.. but i not fond of it

    i love mofongo/mangu tho.. love it.. mmmm
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

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    Registered User TheEducator's Avatar TheEducator is offline
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    Fungee taste terrible to me.

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    Registered User TheEducator's Avatar TheEducator is offline
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    We only call it fungee here by the way.

    The other words have different meanings here.

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    SAINTSational Nica's Avatar Nica is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheEducator View Post
    We only call it fungee here by the way.

    The other words have different meanings here.
    I love fungee, mofongo and accra... I make them all. I have a video on my site for accra. We make ton-ton in Dominica as well, mostly people in the south east do though.
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    Registered User massive25 is offline
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    i haven't had fungi and steam fish (king fish) in awhile. i love it though.

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    Registered User Aquinhaiti4ever is offline
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    Wow wow wow I finally know what exactly a Nigerian girl coworker 2 months ago told she wanted me to come to her house she would cook me some Fufu I told I did not know what it was because I didn't think they made it in Haiti or unless they call it a different name she got mad told me al black people supposed to know what Fufu is because only 2 of us black working in our department she started asking them white folks had you eat Fufu before all of them said after all she was acted crazy I had to tell her I knew what Fufu was I told was just played with her just to make her crazy ass felt good

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