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Thread: Free Movement Of People In The Caribbean??

  1. #1
    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Free Movement Of People In The Caribbean??

    DREAM ON
    BY Dominic Bascombe


    PM: ‘Forget free movement’
    The Prime Minister of St Vincent and the Grenadines, Ralph Gonsalves, has told The Voice that he does not believe that the region would ever see the free movement of Caribbean nationals.

    Gonsalves made his comments on the return leg of a fundraising trip to Malaysia.


    ECONOMY
    He said: “The idea is that by 2008 we will have a single market and move to a single economy, and therefore have a complete movement of labour. I myself don’t think it will happen because of a series of political considerations.”

    He explained: “For example, if a lot of Guyanese of Indian descent went to Trinidad, the persons of African descent will complain. It will change the balance. If a disproportionate number of people of African descent from Guyana go, it will cause problems. That is an issue. I think people will also have an issue with a large number of persons from Jamaica going to other countries. The numbers coming out from the Windward islands is not so problematic, because there has always been that movement between them.”

    Caribbean governments have long aimed for a single Caribbean market and economy that would see the movement of goods and peoples throughout the region.

    However some governments have expressed concerns at the membership of Haiti within the Caribbean Community (Caricom).

    French speaking Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and has seen a number of years of unrest.

    However Gonsalves pointed out that there was a place for Haiti in the region.

    “The revised Treaty of Chaguaramas says that the goal is of free movement. The governments have agreed up to the point that this applies to certain categories, such as skilled Caricom nationals, graduates, and professionals of one kind or another. The decision has been taken at the recent heads of government meeting that we are going to extend the categories.”

    He continued: “The position of the Haitians do pose a challenge. They do not speak the English language, a number of them would want to leave and the smaller countries would find that there was a strain if there were hundreds of thousands of Haitians accessing their health services, education systems, and housing. But unskilled persons may be able to make contributions for labour for instance. In the agricultural sector there is a difficulty in getting labour because a lot of people don’t want to go into agriculture. So there could be some sort of controlled migration.

    “Haiti is part of Caricom. They haven’t signed on to the single market but I expect them to soon sign on because it is in their interests.”

    He also pointed out that the migratory nature of Caribbean nationals would continue to bode well for the future.

    “The future has already been marked out,” he said. “The question is whether the leadership is going to catch up with the people. The Caribbean nationals are extremely migrant. In the UK, a Caribbean woman heads the House of Lords. You have them in all sorts of high profile positions throughout the western world and it is increasingly so, because one of the things about our people is that we adapt fairly well, and by and large we are disciplined.”

    He added: “There is a study by the World Bank which suggests that what we lose is more than what we get in but I’m not sure how dynamic the analysis is. The point is this - if all those persons had stayed, would we have jobs for them?”


    ADMISSION
    In the wide-ranging interview, Gonsalves admitted that St Vincent was badly hit by the drop in revenue from the banana industry but was well on the way to diversification.

    “Bananas has fallen significantly - that is no fault of the farmers but the market regime.”

    He said that diversification plans included a coconut water bottling plant, revival of the arrowroot industry and a vacuum packing facility for root crops.

    He explained: “When you go to the market and you get a dasheen or yam, or a breadfruit, invariably the underside is spoilt. So what we are doing is peeling the root crop first and vacuum packing so that when it is delivered to you, all you do is simply wash it and use it. So that what you buy is what you get, so you don’t have to worry about spoilage.”

    Published: 20 March 2006
    Issue: 1210

    SOURCE: http://www.voice-online.co.uk/content.php?show=8768

  2. #2
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
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    He made some valid points. But trully the OECS must focus on itself and leave the Caribbean to figure out for their own respective countries. Until particular countries do not stop importing chiquita and dole bananas we will have problems. We will have a more serious problem with migration, Anguilla did not join the CSME because of an influx of Jamaicans preluding the bills discussion on the regional level. I don't think the Bahamas will either, or Barbados. This means that the small island economies will have to deal with an influx of manual labour, and serious brain drain when our trained professionals will be sought by larger Caribbean economies.

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    Pork Mout Sugar Apple's Avatar Sugar Apple is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oneshot
    He made some valid points. But trully the OECS must focus on itself and leave the Caribbean to figure out for their own respective countries. Until particular countries do not stop importing chiquita and dole bananas we will have problems. We will have a more serious problem with migration, Anguilla did not join the CSME because of an influx of Jamaicans preluding the bills discussion on the regional level. I don't think the Bahamas will either, or Barbados. This means that the small island economies will have to deal with an influx of manual labour, and serious brain drain when our trained professionals will be sought by larger Caribbean economies.

    Barbados has already signed though...and since when Barbados was not considered a small island economy....:
    We going from Sun til Sun.......

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    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sugar Apple
    Barbados has already signed though...and since when Barbados was not considered a small island economy....:
    my ignorance got the better of me, but trully asking, can you put an economy like Barbados and an OECS economy under the same level.. isn't there some other acroynm to describe it by, maybe more developed country (MDC and LDC)

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    Registered User TriniBob's Avatar TriniBob is offline
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    He explained: “For example, if a lot of Guyanese of Indian descent went to Trinidad, the persons of African descent will complain. It will change the balance. If a disproportionate number of people of African descent from Guyana go, it will cause problems. That is an issue. I think people will also have an issue with a large number of persons from Jamaica going to other countries. The numbers coming out from the Windward islands is not so problematic, because there has always been that movement between them.”
    So tru...says it all!

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    Registered User marabunta is offline
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    As Living and Economic Conditions for Black People continue to RAPIDLY DECLINE within Current US Domestic Borders---

    ----YOU WILL SEE a Mass Exodus of Professional Haitians and Jamaicans seeking NEW OPPORTUNITIES in the Caricom Environment:

    The Arrival of throngs of Jamaican and Haitians at the Ports of Trinidad and Tobago WILL HAVE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT on that Country's Cultural Drift towards a Chutney Society.


    The arrival of Haitians in Guyana WILL BREATHE NEW LIFE into that Vast Wasteland.

  7. #7
    Toppa_Toppa
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    Quote Originally Posted by marabunta
    As Living and Economic Conditions for Black People continue to RAPIDLY DECLINE within Current US Domestic Borders---

    ----YOU WILL SEE a Mass Exodus of Professional Haitians and Jamaicans seeking NEW OPPORTUNITIES in the Caricom Environment:

    The Arrival of throngs of Jamaican and Haitians at the Ports of Trinidad and Tobago WILL HAVE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT on that Country's Cultural Drift towards a Chutney Society.


    The arrival of Haitians in Guyana WILL BREATHE NEW LIFE into that Vast Wasteland.
    Marabunta...oh lawd.

  8. #8
    Earth Angel dollbabi's Avatar dollbabi is offline
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    Interesting...

  9. #9
    Poca
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    I CAN'T BELIEVE THIS. so i guess the english language is soooooo that Haitians would not be able to learn it. so i guess all the Haitians who now resides in USA are all living freely on the government.true Haitians are not english speaking but hey the are very very hardworking, and if the country is in this shape is certainly not because the average Haitian is lazy but rather because of corrupt politics that find reasons in keeping the country the way it is.

    an about how Haitians would just go to the other islands and simply use their educational and health system, well keep in mind that those same Haitians would probably doing the dirtiest and unwanted jobs that locals would feel they are to good to do. so to say that Haitians would not deserve education and health system is bull, because some way or another if they are giving an opportunity to work, they will bust their a$$ to do it.

    Haity is the freaking poorest nation in the caribbean and the western world because its people preferred freedom, over anything else. it is so easy to have a big head and think highly of oneself, when your country is how it is because the people who had rub your past and murdered your ancestors left it after they were done with it....


    gee i am freaking mad.




    However some governments have expressed concerns at the membership of Haiti within the Caribbean Community (Caricom).

    French speaking Haiti is the poorest country in the Western hemisphere and has seen a number of years of unrest.

    However Gonsalves pointed out that there was a place for Haiti in the region.

    “The revised Treaty of Chaguaramas says that the goal is of free movement. The governments have agreed up to the point that this applies to certain categories, such as skilled Caricom nationals, graduates, and professionals of one kind or another. The decision has been taken at the recent heads of government meeting that we are going to extend the categories.”

    He continued: “The position of the Haitians do pose a challenge. They do not speak the English language, a number of them would want to leave and the smaller countries would find that there was a strain if there were hundreds of thousands of Haitians accessing their health services, education systems, and housing. But unskilled persons may be able to make contributions for labour for instance. In the agricultural sector there is a difficulty in getting labour because a lot of people don’t want to go into agriculture. So there could be some sort of controlled migration.

    “Haiti is part of Caricom. They haven’t signed on to the single market but I expect them to soon sign on because it is in their interests.”

  10. #10
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by marabunta
    As Living and Economic Conditions for Black People continue to RAPIDLY DECLINE within Current US Domestic Borders---

    ----YOU WILL SEE a Mass Exodus of Professional Haitians and Jamaicans seeking NEW OPPORTUNITIES in the Caricom Environment:

    The Arrival of throngs of Jamaican and Haitians at the Ports of Trinidad and Tobago WILL HAVE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT on that Country's Cultural Drift towards a Chutney Society.


    The arrival of Haitians in Guyana WILL BREATHE NEW LIFE into that Vast Wasteland.
    So i guess next time around for World Cup we will have de Passa Passa Chutney Soca Warriors

  11. #11
    Registered User marabunta is offline
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    Soraya:

    Haitians Will Shock the Hell outta Petit Bourgeoisie Politicians like Gonsalves-----

    ------I call them the Stealth People of the Caribbean.

    In Florida alone they constitute a significant voting block, and have produced Mayors in the City of North Miami----They even have Elected Representation in the Florida Legislature, and have taken over Radio Stations people thought were Jamaican.......All this happening before those Soca the Vote Jokers appeared on the scene.

    Just WAIT until they start SPREADING OUT in those Little Caricom Islands and start Influencing Sh8t.
    Last edited by marabunta; 03-20-2006 at 09:59 PM.

  12. #12
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by marabunta
    Soraya:

    Haitians Will Shock the Hell outta Petit Bourgeoisie Politicians like Gonsalves-----

    ------I call them the Stealth People of the Caribbean.

    In Florida alone they constitute a significant voting block, and have produced Mayors in the City of North Miami----They even have Elected Representation in the Florida Legislature, and have taken over Radio Stations people thought were Jamaican.......All this happening before those Soca the Vote Jokers appeared on the scene.

    Just WAIT until they start SPREADING OUT in those Little Caricom Islands and start Influencing Sh8t.
    The Haitians are already in Dominica, and we have serious issues with them using the island as point to enter other countries illegally.. we paying the price.. Peter paying for Paul

  13. #13
    Poca
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    so i guess that they do not stay in dominica.

  14. #14
    Registered User small_island_descent's Avatar small_island_descent is offline
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    If I was Haitian reading that article, I'd be so cheesed. I'm already cheesed for Haiti as it is.

  15. #15
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by soraya
    so i guess that they do not stay in dominica.
    Some do, the problem is our government and people getting slabbed with various resrtictions on travel within the region.. but i blame my own people so cause the boats are dominican own

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