Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 20
Like Tree8Likes

Thread: Dominican court ruling strips citizenship from thousands of offspring of Haitian migr

  1. #1
    Registered User Seawall's Avatar Seawall is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    maryland
    Posts
    4,328
    Credits
    11,321,991

    Dominican court ruling strips citizenship from thousands of offspring of Haitian migr

    Shame this is happening in this day and age.

    Dominican court ruling strips citizenship from thousands of offspring of Haitian migrants - The Washington Post



    Dominican court ruling strips citizenship from thousands of offspring of Haitian migrants

    Ezequiel Abiu Lopez, File/Associated Press - FILE - In this July 15, 2013 file photo, Haitians and Dominicans gather at a market in the border town of Dajabon in the Dominican Republic. The Dominican Republic’s top court on Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013 stripped citizenship from thousands of people born to illegal migrants, a category that overwhelmingly includes Haitians brought from their neighboring homeland to work on farms. The decision cannot be appealed, and it affects all those born since 1929.

    By Associated Press, Published: September 26
    SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic — The Dominican Republic’s top court on Thursday stripped citizenship from thousands of people born to migrants who came illegally, a category that overwhelmingly includes Haitians brought in to work on farms.

    The decision cannot be appealed, and it affects all those born since 1929.

    Golden Dawn party members were charged with membership in a criminal organization.
    The Constitutional Court’s ruling says officials are studying birth certificates of more than 16,000 people and notes that electoral authorities have refused to issue identity documents to 40,000 people of Haitian descent.

    The decision, which gives the electoral commission a year to produce a list of those to be excluded, is a blow to activists who have tried to block what they call “denationalization” of many residents.

    “This is outrageous,” said Ana Maria Belique, spokeswoman for a nonprofit group that has fought for the rights of migrants’ children. “It’s an injustice based on prejudice and xenophobia.”

    Until 2010, the Dominican Republic followed the principle of automatically bestowing citizenship to anyone born on its soil. But the court ruled that all Haitian migrants who came to work in Dominican sugarcane fields after 1929 were in transit, and thus their children were not automatically entitled to citizenship just because they were born here.

    The Economy Ministry recently calculated that some 500,000 migrants born in Haiti now live in the Dominican Republic, but it gave no estimate for the number of people of Haitian descent living in the country. The Dominican Republic’s total population is a little over 10 million.

    The office of Haitian Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe did not respond to messages seeking comment about the ruling. Lamothe was in New York at the United Nations General Assembly.

    David Abraham, a law professor at the University of Miami, said the decision was part of a larger effort to keep Haitians from entering the Dominican Republic and to encourage self-deportation.

    He cited the racial differences between predominantly black Haitians and mixed-race Dominicans as well as Haiti’s plight as one of the world’s poorest countries.

    “The fear of the Dominican Republic, of being pulled down to the level of Haiti economically and the ‘blackening’ of the country, has been an obsession of Dominican politicians for well over a century,” he said.

    The Spanish-speaking Dominican Republic and Creole-speaking Haiti share the island of Hispaniola and have a long, troubled history.

    Haiti invaded and took over the Dominican Republic for more than 20 years in the 19th century. Then in 1937, Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo ordered the massacre of an estimated 20,000 Haitians as he sought to expel them from the country.

    After Haiti’s devastating 2010 earthquake that killed an estimated 300,000 people, the Dominican Republic temporarily halted deportations and helped with relief efforts. It was a rare break in tensions that have since resumed.

    Dominican lawyer Cristobal Rodriguez, who opposes the ruling, said the court disregarded the principle of law retroactivity by applying the criteria of a new constitution approved in 2010 to people born decades earlier.

    Those affected by the court’s ruling are basically left in limbo because a 2004 law that would have addressed the status of those born to migrants living illegally in the Dominican Republic was never applied.

    “This ruling cuts against the rights of thousands of people born in the Dominican Republic, and could immediately undermine their access to education and health services,” Reed Brody, counsel and spokesman for Human Rights Watch, said in a statement. “It’s also likely to discourage an entire community from seeking help when they suffer abuses, for fear of authorities learning their status.”

    In Port-au-Prince, construction worker Jean Ronald said he was disheartened by the ruling but wouldn’t be discouraged from crossing the border when he needs a job.

    “This isn’t going to stop me, because I need to find work on the other side of the island,” Ronald, a single, 32-year-old father of two boys, said at a construction site in Port-au-Prince. “Life is a risk, and I’m going to take that risk.”

    Activists said they would likely seek help from the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, which in turn might submit the case to the Inter-American Court of Human Rights.

    Jorge Duany, an anthropology professor at Florida International University who has studied the migration of Dominicans in the Caribbean, said the decision comes after countless years of friction between the two countries.

    “The impact could be truly catastrophic,” he said. “They are stigmatizing an entire Haitian population.”

    ___

    Associated Press writer Ezequiel Abiu Lopez reported this story in Santo Domingo and Danica Coto reported from San Juan, Puerto Rico. AP writers Trenton Daniel and Evens Sanon in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, contributed to this report.

    Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

    “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters.” Frederick Douglass

  2. #2
    ***//\\*** femmeayitienne's Avatar femmeayitienne is offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    10,328
    Credits
    72,326,384
    Can you imagine if the U.S. adopted that policy?

  3. #3
    Real Patriot Klang's Avatar Klang is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    1,757
    Credits
    1,715,063
    for a second i got excited...if u know what i mean...
    i only promote dominica's culture...who vex loss.........

  4. #4
    Repect Our Soca Pioneers Socapro's Avatar Socapro is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Soca Island
    Posts
    16,715
    Credits
    890,264,425
    The Haitians are starting to remind me of the Guyanese.

    Why not go back home and help to re-build your own country rather than building someone else's country which you invaded in the past and having to endure the humiliation of being stripped of citizenship today?!
    Catch me as Soca PhD Every Saturday 2-4pm GMT
    On www.GenesisRadio.co.uk (91.6FM);
    Every Tueday 6-8pm & Friday 8-10pm GMT
    On www.HavitLive.co.uk (99.1FM);
    www.facebook.com/socaphd
    email: projampro@yahoo.co.uk

    Hailing from Trinidad & Tobago and very proud of it!!
    Land of Calypso, Steelband, Limbo, Parang, Rapso, Chutney-Soca, Soca, Jamoo, Panjazz and the Biggest, Best & Most Influential Caribbean Carnival in the World with no apology!
    Together We Aspire & Together We Achieve!!

  5. #5
    Real Patriot Klang's Avatar Klang is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    1,757
    Credits
    1,715,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Socapro View Post
    The Haitians are starting to remind me of the Guyanese.

    Why not go back home and help to re-build your own country rather than building someone else's country which you invaded in the past and having to endure the humiliation of being stripped of citizenship today?!
    unfortunately i gotta agree with you here, minus the guyanese part
    i only promote dominica's culture...who vex loss.........

  6. #6
    Registered User SKBai1991's Avatar SKBai1991 is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,780
    Credits
    11,357,279
    Quote Originally Posted by Socapro View Post
    The Haitians are starting to remind me of the Guyanese.

    Why not go back home and help to re-build your own country rather than building someone else's country which you invaded in the past and having to endure the humiliation of being stripped of citizenship today?!
    well why don't you take your own advice and move back to Trinidad then? If it wasn't absolutely IMPERATIVE to move to the Dominican Republic to make a living Haitians wouldn't go there.


    This ruling affects people who have been in the DR for three and four generations, not just Haitians who recently hopped the border. Many of these people (my own family members included) don't speak a lick of creole, never seen Haiti and have NO ties to the country other than the fact that their ancestors left there 50 or 60 years ago. Why would they go back and build a country that's effectively not theirs?

    Quote Originally Posted by Klang View Post
    unfortunately i gotta agree with you here, minus the guyanese part
    Quote Originally Posted by Klang View Post
    for a second i got excited...if u know what i mean...
    Tell that to all the Dominicans piled up in Guadeloupe, St Maarten & the VI...people itching to fling aryou ass out same way so don't get hype when you're only a very VERY small step above.
    "sa ki ta'w sé ta'w, la rivié pé pa chayé'l "


    Father, before mi mind get bad
    Betta yuh flip it round and mek mi mind get mad
    Mi prefer fi work hard everyday fi achieve mi goals
    Nah grudge nobody fi dem own

  7. #7
    Repect Our Soca Pioneers Socapro's Avatar Socapro is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Soca Island
    Posts
    16,715
    Credits
    890,264,425
    Quote Originally Posted by SKBai1991 View Post
    well why don't you take your own advice and move back to Trinidad then? If it wasn't absolutely IMPERATIVE to move to the Dominican Republic to make a living Haitians wouldn't go there.


    This ruling affects people who have been in the DR for three and four generations, not just Haitians who recently hopped the border. Many of these people (my own family members included) don't speak a lick of creole, never seen Haiti and have NO ties to the country other than the fact that their ancestors left there 50 or 60 years ago. Why would they go back and build a country that's effectively not theirs?
    I can sympathise with those who have been there for generations and regard themselves culturally as Dominicans as you pointed out.

    With regards to myself, I am outside here mainly to promote my music and culture and still have my T&T citizenship and won't care too much if I was asked to return to T&T tomorrow as I also have a home in Diego Martin Trinidad and send money back regularly.
    Catch me as Soca PhD Every Saturday 2-4pm GMT
    On www.GenesisRadio.co.uk (91.6FM);
    Every Tueday 6-8pm & Friday 8-10pm GMT
    On www.HavitLive.co.uk (99.1FM);
    www.facebook.com/socaphd
    email: projampro@yahoo.co.uk

    Hailing from Trinidad & Tobago and very proud of it!!
    Land of Calypso, Steelband, Limbo, Parang, Rapso, Chutney-Soca, Soca, Jamoo, Panjazz and the Biggest, Best & Most Influential Caribbean Carnival in the World with no apology!
    Together We Aspire & Together We Achieve!!

  8. #8
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NEW YORK
    Posts
    17,206
    Credits
    101,493,621
    excellent news, Dominicans need to protect their heritage
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  9. #9
    Repect Our Soca Pioneers Socapro's Avatar Socapro is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Soca Island
    Posts
    16,715
    Credits
    890,264,425
    Quote Originally Posted by Klang View Post
    unfortunately i gotta agree with you here, minus the guyanese part
    The Guyanese part was a tongue-in-cheek stab at Seawall who I enjoy whining up.
    Catch me as Soca PhD Every Saturday 2-4pm GMT
    On www.GenesisRadio.co.uk (91.6FM);
    Every Tueday 6-8pm & Friday 8-10pm GMT
    On www.HavitLive.co.uk (99.1FM);
    www.facebook.com/socaphd
    email: projampro@yahoo.co.uk

    Hailing from Trinidad & Tobago and very proud of it!!
    Land of Calypso, Steelband, Limbo, Parang, Rapso, Chutney-Soca, Soca, Jamoo, Panjazz and the Biggest, Best & Most Influential Caribbean Carnival in the World with no apology!
    Together We Aspire & Together We Achieve!!

  10. #10
    Real Patriot Klang's Avatar Klang is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    1,757
    Credits
    1,715,063
    Quote Originally Posted by SKBai1991 View Post
    well why don't you take your own advice and move back to Trinidad then? If it wasn't absolutely IMPERATIVE to move to the Dominican Republic to make a living Haitians wouldn't go there.


    This ruling affects people who have been in the DR for three and four generations, not just Haitians who recently hopped the border. Many of these people (my own family members included) don't speak a lick of creole, never seen Haiti and have NO ties to the country other than the fact that their ancestors left there 50 or 60 years ago. Why would they go back and build a country that's effectively not theirs?


    Tell that to all the Dominicans piled up in Guadeloupe, St Maarten & the VI...people itching to fling aryou ass out same way so don't get hype when you're only a very VERY small step above.
    i agree dominicans should start making their way back home. yet you cannot compare dominica to haiti, when we have thousands of haitians in dominica. i dont think you know how many haitians are in dominica right now if you make that statement bro... we are nowhere near as troublesome as them. i wish the haitian people all the best, and i dont have a problem with the good haitians them living in my island, however i dont know if it is necessarily beneficial to both. unlike america and the u.s.v.i, dominica is not an island based off of immigration. with all that being i not biased the situation has improved a lot, i am just not a fan of people leaving their country so willingly.
    Socapro likes this.
    i only promote dominica's culture...who vex loss.........

  11. #11
    Registered User Dr Insane's Avatar Dr Insane is offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    DOWN IN AH DE GHETTO
    Posts
    38,722
    Credits
    3,491,164
    These people just racist that's all
    tikreyol and biggadon like this.

  12. #12
    Real Patriot Klang's Avatar Klang is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    1,757
    Credits
    1,715,063
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Insane View Post
    These people just racist that's all
    wdf? if the dr cannot support all those haitians what are they suppose to do? i know life in the dominican republic is perceived as much better, but honestly the dr has many problems of their own. 500,000 fukkin haitians? cmon
    i only promote dominica's culture...who vex loss.........

  13. #13
    Real Patriot Klang's Avatar Klang is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    earth
    Posts
    1,757
    Credits
    1,715,063
    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    excellent news, Dominicans need to protect their heritage
    at this point i doubt it is even about heritage at this point, how can a country like the dr control 500,000 immigrants? like i said. the dr is not like america, it is not based off of immigration.
    i only promote dominica's culture...who vex loss.........

  14. #14
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    NEW YORK
    Posts
    17,206
    Credits
    101,493,621
    Quote Originally Posted by Dr Insane View Post
    These people just racist that's all
    how is this racist? you dont know cuz ur island never had an unchecked problem with immigration

    sometimes allyuh need 2 put alyuh self in the shoes of others and stop being so proud of being stupid
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  15. #15
    Registered User SKBai1991's Avatar SKBai1991 is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,780
    Credits
    11,357,279
    Quote Originally Posted by Klang View Post
    i agree dominicans should start making their way back home. yet you cannot compare dominica to haiti, when we have thousands of haitians in dominica. i dont think you know how many haitians are in dominica right now if you make that statement bro... we are nowhere near as troublesome as them. i wish the haitian people all the best, and i dont have a problem with the good haitians them living in my island, however i dont know if it is necessarily beneficial to both. unlike america and the u.s.v.i, dominica is not an island based off of immigration. with all that being i not biased the situation has improved a lot, i am just not a fan of people leaving their country so willingly.
    First of all the number of Haitians in Dominica is grossly exaggerated, most Haitians in Dominica are really interested in going to Guadeloupe, Martinique & St Maarten and are simply in transit, relatively few actually stay. Secondly, to say that you're "not nearly as troublesome as them" when the government in St. Maarten is ITCHING to fling aryou out for most of the same reasons (violence, drug trafficking, illegal immigration) that people want to get rid of Haitians, so you lot are NO better than us.
    tikreyol likes this.
    "sa ki ta'w sé ta'w, la rivié pé pa chayé'l "


    Father, before mi mind get bad
    Betta yuh flip it round and mek mi mind get mad
    Mi prefer fi work hard everyday fi achieve mi goals
    Nah grudge nobody fi dem own

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •