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Thread: Dear haitians,Sup with modern slavery?

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    Dear haitians,Sup with modern slavery?

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    Jury hears Haitian 'slave' trial
    A 'slave' trial started in federal court with both sides painting starkly different pictures of a Haitian girl's experiences in Kendall and Miramar.
    Posted on Tue, Feb. 26, 2008
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    By JAY WEAVER
    jweaver@MiamiHerald.com

    Simone Celestin was snatched from a Haitian orphanage as a young teen and forced to live like a ''slave'' in a Southwest Miami-Dade home, where a family ''punched, slapped or hit'' the girl to make her work marathon hours without pay, a federal prosecutor said Monday.

    ''For six years, this family made Simone work and lie about who she was,'' Cyra O'Daniel told a federal jury at the start of the trial in Fort Lauderdale.

    O'Daniel said Celestin was taken from her mother at age 5, kept in an orphanage and smuggled to Miami as a ''niece.'' Celestin, who was living in the country illegally, ''escaped'' at age 20 in 2005 after the family ''stole her liberty,'' O'Daniel said.

    Evelyn Theodore and her two grown daughters, Maude Paulin and Claire Telasco, now stand trial on charges of human trafficking and forced labor. Paulin's ex-husband, Saintfort Paulin, faces one charge of harboring the girl for profit.

    Theodore is accused of smuggling the girl to Miami at age 14 in 1999, when Celestin began living with Theodore's daughter, Maude, a schoolteacher, at her Kendall home. Celestin also spent weekends at the Miramar home of Theodore's other daughter, Telasco, a nurse.

    U.S. District Judge Jose A. Gonzalez Jr. is presiding over the trial in Fort Lauderdale because a judge in federal court in Miami who was originally assigned the case had a scheduling conflict.

    The trial, which is expected to last two weeks, comes at a time when the Bush administration has placed strong emphasis on trafficking enforcement. The South Florida prosecution is based on the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, which was enacted in 2000.

    Prosecutors said Celestin lived in fear of being deported, under conditions that amounted to involuntary servitude -- 15-hour work days, seven days a week, no schooling and no freedom. She slept on a rolled-up mattress on the dining-room floor, bathed with a hose in the backyard, and was told to hide in the closet or garbage when visitors came over.

    But defense attorneys painted a starkly different picture in their opening statements, saying Maude Paulin had intended to adopt Celestin but her plan fell apart when she and her husband divorced. They also said family members tried to enroll Celestin in high school, but she only spoke and understood English at the level of a kindergartner.

    ''Maude Paulin is not guilty of what she's been charged with,'' said her attorney, Richard Dansoh. ``She tried to do her best. She fell short. It's not a crime to try your best and fail.''

    He and other defense lawyers said Celestin may not have been cared for as well as Paulin's teenage daughter, Erika, but she was not treated like a modern-day slave. She received regular meals at home, went to church, watched pop artists like Britney Spears on TV, and went out with boys.

    They said she did not escape with the help of family friends, as prosecutors contended, but rather ran away because she had grown up and wanted to be on her own.

    ''Does she report to the doctors that she's been treated like an animal in six years?'' said Theodore's attorney, Leonard Fenn, citing medical records at Jackson Memorial Hospital. ``Absolutely not.''

    He said local and state authorities were well aware of Celestin's condition during her six years in Paulin's household, concluding she would be better off here than in Haiti. He said federal prosecutors pursued a criminal case after Celestin agreed to testify in exchange for lawful residency.

    ''In order for her to be here [in the United States], she has to play ball,'' Fenn told the 12-member jury.

    Another defense attorney, Joel DeFabio, representing Telasco, said the evidence will show his client ``is not a slave master.''

    ''They did not have Simone come on weekends to clean the [Miramar] house,'' DeFabio said.

    ``It didn't happen.''

  2. #2
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
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    dis eh going anywhere

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    Registered User RotiKing2004eva is offline
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    Thumbs down

    Modern day slavery is Dominican rice farmers paying haitians 20 pesos a month ( 59 cents ) to work the land, but they get all the rice and live in a closet sized hut to live in, with their family.

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    Quote Originally Posted by RotiKing2004eva View Post
    Modern day slavery is Dominican rice farmers paying haitians 20 pesos a month ( 59 cents ) to work the land, but they get all the rice and live in a closet sized hut to live in, with their family.
    you really going to comparre these grown ADULTS getting pd lvery low wages

    to a child being brought to the states slavery?


    using one on problem to divert attention from another
    is not fixing,addressing or even denouncing the initial problem

    its simply ignoring it

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    Boonoonoonoos jamaicangirl's Avatar jamaicangirl is offline
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    I hear that there are actually a number of slaves in Manhattan- foreigners working for free in the homes of some of the country's wealthiest families.

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    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by jamaicangirl View Post
    I hear that there are actually a number of slaves in Manhattan- foreigners working for free in the homes of some of the country's wealthiest families.
    truth

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