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Thread: Carnival in danger in Trinidad and Tobago

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    STEADY WUK Colors's Avatar Colors is offline
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    Carnival in danger in Trinidad and Tobago

    I really do not see how it is in danger but here is the report:

    A new study titled “Towards Improvement and Excellence Report on Carnival Observations 2012-2014”, has found declining support for the festival and a negative shift in attitudes in relation to how Trinbagonians view the celebrations.

    The data released in the study indicates more people are leaving the twin island during Carnival season than visitors are coming in — a startling reality given that Carnival is being marketed so people could come to the island.

    The study was released by the Ministry of Arts and Multiculturalism on September 17 at a stakeholder session at the Hyatt Regency in Port-of-Spain. Damian Richardson, a Culture Officer with the Ministry, addressed the findings from the study.

    He said, “The parade is our marquee event and the number of spectators has dropped by considerable numbers over the last three years. We need to ask serious questions...why should people stay for the parade? What is it about the quality of the show that has changed?”

    Richardson said the study was meant to trigger the serious conversations that stakeholders should be having about Carnival, but more importantly, engender interest in how to revive the festival, especially the parade of the bands.

    He said for the study the Ministry sent researchers into the field to observe what was happening during the Carnival season. They gauged the experiences of persons at various events, organised several cultural forums during the season, and also reviewed press reports and letters published over the period under study.

    What they found was that people were not as interested in Carnival as they used to be and according to Richardson, the public had a lot to say about how events were being organised and the quality of the shows on offer. He cited the issue of staging, saying persons complained about how lighting was not always optimum. Also, persons surveyed felt there was no evident artistic or technical direction in television broadcasts.

    “This says that we really need to upgrade what we capture and present for television,” Richardson remarked. He added, “We need to pay attention to audience experience and to focus on making it (Carnival) rich and sustainable.”

    He said the study will be available on the Ministry’s website in another few weeks and that the public will provide feedback.

    He said information and research was what is driving policy within the Ministry and as a result, they will continue to press for wider stakeholder engagements as well as fund new research initiatives.

    Richardson also released another report at the same forum, which was produced by the Ministry. The report, “Carnival: Trinidad and Tobago Style - The Blueprint” is a draft document, he said, but when completed it was expected to serve as a guide for persons outside of Trinidad and Tobago who are interested in staging a similar-styled event.

    Some stakeholders at the forum promptly registered concerns with the draft document saying that it failed to capture the essence of Carnival by disconnecting the festival from its historical background which includes African resistance and organic cultural expressions.

    Activist Tyehimba Salandy was vociferous in his rejection of the document calling it “a watered down representation of what Carnival represents.” He said the historical references cannot be separated from the festival and cautioned that the Ministry runs the risk of exporting an idea of Carnival that fails to embody the true essence of it.

    But Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Maurice Suite later stressed that the document was a draft and would be strengthened through stakeholder engagement. He also clarified that it was not meant to promote Carnival, but rather serve as a guide to others hoping to plan a similar-styled event.

    Carnival reportedly generates over US$20million in income and attracts over 40,000 visitors to Trinidad and Tobago annually. The draft document addresses the monetisation of the festival, the role of government in facilitating it, and its social benefits, among others.


    Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday : newsday.co.tt :

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    CaribKaraoke.com Owner CaribKaraoke's Avatar CaribKaraoke is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colors View Post
    I
    Carnival reportedly generates over US$20million in income and attracts over 40,000 visitors to Trinidad and Tobago annually. The draft document addresses the monetisation of the festival, the role of government in facilitating it, and its social benefits, among others.


    Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday : newsday.co.tt :
    numbers seem small tbh
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    STEADY WUK Colors's Avatar Colors is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaribKaraoke View Post
    numbers seem small tbh

    over 40,000 visitors is small.....what would be big then

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    Repect Our Soca Pioneers Socapro's Avatar Socapro is offline
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    Nah Carnival in T&T won't be cancelled as any government who tries to cancel Carnival in T&T will be voted out and they are well aware of that.
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    Girl Crush Mrs. Campbell's Avatar Mrs. Campbell is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colors View Post
    I really do not see how it is in danger but here is the report:

    A new study titled “Towards Improvement and Excellence Report on Carnival Observations 2012-2014”, has found declining support for the festival and a negative shift in attitudes in relation to how Trinbagonians view the celebrations.

    The data released in the study indicates more people are leaving the twin island during Carnival season than visitors are coming in — a startling reality given that Carnival is being marketed so people could come to the island.

    The study was released by the Ministry of Arts and Multiculturalism on September 17 at a stakeholder session at the Hyatt Regency in Port-of-Spain. Damian Richardson, a Culture Officer with the Ministry, addressed the findings from the study.

    He said, “The parade is our marquee event and the number of spectators has dropped by considerable numbers over the last three years. We need to ask serious questions...why should people stay for the parade? What is it about the quality of the show that has changed?”

    Richardson said the study was meant to trigger the serious conversations that stakeholders should be having about Carnival, but more importantly, engender interest in how to revive the festival, especially the parade of the bands.

    He said for the study the Ministry sent researchers into the field to observe what was happening during the Carnival season. They gauged the experiences of persons at various events, organised several cultural forums during the season, and also reviewed press reports and letters published over the period under study.

    What they found was that people were not as interested in Carnival as they used to be and according to Richardson, the public had a lot to say about how events were being organised and the quality of the shows on offer. He cited the issue of staging, saying persons complained about how lighting was not always optimum. Also, persons surveyed felt there was no evident artistic or technical direction in television broadcasts.

    “This says that we really need to upgrade what we capture and present for television,” Richardson remarked. He added, “We need to pay attention to audience experience and to focus on making it (Carnival) rich and sustainable.”

    He said the study will be available on the Ministry’s website in another few weeks and that the public will provide feedback.

    He said information and research was what is driving policy within the Ministry and as a result, they will continue to press for wider stakeholder engagements as well as fund new research initiatives.

    Richardson also released another report at the same forum, which was produced by the Ministry. The report, “Carnival: Trinidad and Tobago Style - The Blueprint” is a draft document, he said, but when completed it was expected to serve as a guide for persons outside of Trinidad and Tobago who are interested in staging a similar-styled event.

    Some stakeholders at the forum promptly registered concerns with the draft document saying that it failed to capture the essence of Carnival by disconnecting the festival from its historical background which includes African resistance and organic cultural expressions.

    Activist Tyehimba Salandy was vociferous in his rejection of the document calling it “a watered down representation of what Carnival represents.” He said the historical references cannot be separated from the festival and cautioned that the Ministry runs the risk of exporting an idea of Carnival that fails to embody the true essence of it.

    But Permanent Secretary in the Ministry, Maurice Suite later stressed that the document was a draft and would be strengthened through stakeholder engagement. He also clarified that it was not meant to promote Carnival, but rather serve as a guide to others hoping to plan a similar-styled event.

    Carnival reportedly generates over US$20million in income and attracts over 40,000 visitors to Trinidad and Tobago annually. The draft document addresses the monetisation of the festival, the role of government in facilitating it, and its social benefits, among others.


    Trinidad and Tobago's Newsday : newsday.co.tt :
    That's it?!

    Seems they spend more to make pocket change.....#damn
    Our Queen went to sleep, her people left to weep....in song she lives on.



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    STEADY WUK Colors's Avatar Colors is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Socapro View Post
    Nah Carnival in T&T won't be cancelled as any government who tries to cancel Carnival in T&T will be voted out and they are well aware of that.
    Do not think they want to cancel the carnival in Trinidad.....I see the article stated less people coming to visit and participate and watch the parade

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    CaribKaraoke.com Owner CaribKaraoke's Avatar CaribKaraoke is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colors View Post
    over 40,000 visitors is small.....what would be big then
    $20 US Million is small....is that over the span of 2 days of carnival? how they calculate that....? is that 2 days....or the season?

    And sorry for looking at not looking at the real issue of the article....I just read it and said the entire article is rubbish.....
    http://www.CaribKaraoke.com

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    Move Quick...Doh Stick TRINILI0N's Avatar TRINILI0N is offline
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    As the years go by ... the CULTURE in the Caribbean has been westernized. Its only about Getting focked up and nekkidness ... the majority dont give a fock anymore.
    bktrini305, Lappo and triniochun like this.
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    Registered User Lappo's Avatar Lappo is offline
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    lol nuff trini padnahs i know dont really care for it...they may go and pass thru to check de scene, but in truth you doh find as many as before participating in carnial events. not only de jump up, but de pan, de stickfighting, de calypso monarch etc. in my opinion idk if carnival in trinidad has died, but it has definitely transformed into something else. i remember de days when trinidad use to have dem nice calypsos, now all i hearing is pop music. what happened to calypso in carnival? when last a live calypso and jam in de streets for jouvert?

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    Registered User antiguad is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colors View Post
    over 40,000 visitors is small.....what would be big then
    I think what he means is that with the numbers of visitors, the $20 million in revenue seems small or underestimated.

    With all the money that people bring in, I think it's a serious underestimation as well. Tens of thousands of people paying airport tax, accommodation, travel, costumes, fetes, food, gift items, etc I would expect a heck of a lot more than that.
    mz_JazE likes this.

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    Was on a trini car tuning website...
    was talking about cars and it came up in conversation that i was heading down there for carnival... They responded how they could understand how foreigners want spend their good money to come down there just to hear the same soca songs over and over again
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

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    Move Quick...Doh Stick TRINILI0N's Avatar TRINILI0N is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lappo View Post
    lol nuff trini padnahs i know dont really care for it...they may go and pass thru to check de scene, but in truth you doh find as many as before participating in carnial events. not only de jump up, but de pan, de stickfighting, de calypso monarch etc. in my opinion idk if carnival in trinidad has died, but it has definitely transformed into something else. i remember de days when trinidad use to have dem nice calypsos, now all i hearing is pop music. what happened to calypso in carnival? when last a live calypso and jam in de streets for jouvert?
    De vybz still there inno ... Just for d artists dem to create it.
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    Repect Our Soca Pioneers Socapro's Avatar Socapro is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lappo View Post
    lol nuff trini padnahs i know dont really care for it...they may go and pass thru to check de scene, but in truth you doh find as many as before participating in carnial events. not only de jump up, but de pan, de stickfighting, de calypso monarch etc. in my opinion idk if carnival in trinidad has died, but it has definitely transformed into something else. i remember de days when trinidad use to have dem nice calypsos, now all i hearing is pop music. what happened to calypso in carnival? when last a live calypso and jam in de streets for jouvert?
    I believe you are hearing what you want to hear as there was tons of calypso and non-pop groovy soca release earlier this year for T&T Carnival.

    Just check these two threads and then go wash yuh mouth out.

    New T&T 2014 Calypso/Kai-Soca & Pan-Kaiso Releases!!

    Hot New T&T 2013/2014 Groovy Soca Releases!!
    dollbabi likes this.
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    Hailing from Trinidad & Tobago and very proud of it!!
    Land of Calypso, Steelband, Limbo, Parang, Rapso, Chutney-Soca, Soca, Jamoo, Panjazz and the Biggest, Best & Most Influential Caribbean Carnival in the World with no apology!
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    Registered User dedetriniking's Avatar dedetriniking is offline
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    Like every other genre of music the artistic level has been drastically reduced over the years IMHO...but carnival itself will never die.
    dollbabi likes this.
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    Girl Crush Mrs. Campbell's Avatar Mrs. Campbell is offline
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    Did you read the article?

    The question is why are locals leaving and or turning away droves. So instead of answering something NOT asked...address the points presented.

    Seems the study found, the festival is moving away from its core....it's essence.

    So again dying???? Maybe not. Morphing into something else the locals do not like, no longer able to recognize and or care for?????.......

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