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Thread: callaloo, calulu, bitekuteku,similarities between african, caribbean,southamerican

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    callaloo, calulu, bitekuteku,similarities between african, caribbean,southamerican

    Vegetables

    Calalu,or calalloo, or calulu, or bitekuteku, or caruru,or folong

    Callaloo
    (sometimes calaloo or kallaloo) is a popular Caribbean dish served in different variants in across the Caribbean. The main ingredient is a leaf vegetable, traditionally either amaranth (known by many local names including callaloo or bhaaji), taro or Xanthosoma. Both are known by many names including callaloo, coco, tannia, bhaaji, or dasheen bush. Because the leaf vegetable used in some regions may be locally called "callaloo" or "callaloo bush", some confusion can arise among the different vegetables and with the dish itself. Outside of the Caribbean, water spinach is occasionally used. Trinidadians primarily use taro/dasheen bush for callaloo, while Jamaicans and Guyanese use the name callaloo to refer to amaranth, and use it in a plethora of dishes and also a drink ('callaloo juice'). It should be understood that the 'callaloo' made in Jamaica is different from the 'callaloo' made in Trinidad and Tobago in terms of main ingredient (the leaf used) and other ingredients included (for example, Jamaicans tend to use only callaloo leaf, salt, onions, escallion and simply steam the vegetable, while Trinidadians use okra and coconut milk to make an entirely different dish with a different taste and consistency).

    Caluluor bitekuteku or folong

    a typical dish Calulu of Angola and Sao Tome and Principe anddemocratic republic of Congo

    Can be made ​​with fresh or dried fish and dried meat. Other ingredients include tomato, garlic, okra, sweet potatoes, spinach, zucchini and palm oil.

    In Angola, the fish is prepared in a pan Calulu, which are interspersed with layers of dried fish and fresh fish with remaining ingredients. It is cooked on medium heat and served with funge and beans with palm oil. In Sao Tome and Principe, Fish Calulu can also be made with shrimp.

    The meat is prepared with dried meat soaked beforehand. It is also cooked on medium heat and funge and served with beans and palm oil.

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    jamaican callaloo



    Jamaican callaloo on the other hand is more the name of a plant (amaranth) which is used in making the popular Jamaican dish, by the same name

    1 lb. callaloo
    1/2 lb. Saltfish (codfish)
    1 sprig tyme
    1 crushed garlic or 2 teaspoons garlic powder
    1 tablespoon margarine or vegetable oil
    1 scotch bonnet pepper
    1 medium chopped onion
    black pepper
    salt to taste
    1/4 cup water

    Shop Now for Jamaican recipe ingredients & seasoning in our online store.

    METHOD:

    Wash callaloo leaves
    Cut up callaloo leaves in pieces.
    Sauté saltfish, onion, garlic, pepper, tyme in margarine or oil
    Add cut up callaloo leaves, water and stir.
    Cover saucepan and cook callalloo are tender.
    Add whole scotch bonnet pepper
    Sprinkle with pepper and salt.
    Simmer then serve with avocado pear, boil banana and/or fried dumplings.

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    calulu de peixe (calulu with fish) Angola



    1kg dried, salted, fish (salt cod can be used) — (for preparing your own, see the recipe on how to prepare saltfish/stockfish) 1kg fresh fish, cut into steaks 1 onion, finely sliced 3 large, ripe, tomatoes, chopped 1 hot chilli (eg Scotch bonnet), very finely chopped 500g okra, trimmed and sliced 1kg sweet potato leaves (or cassava leaves) [substitute blanched collard greens or kale] 3 garlic cloves 1 tsp sea salt juice of 1 lemon 300ml red palm oil 2 courgettes, sliced


    Add the dried fish to a bowl, cover with boiling water and set aside for 20 minutes. After this time drain he fish and pour more hot water to cover then set aside for 1 hour. Meanwhile, add the fresh fish to a bowl and season with the garlic, salt and lemon juice. Set aside to marinate for 20 minutes. In a large pot, alternate layers of dried fish, fresh fish, sliced onion, sliced courgettes, sweet potato leaves and sliced okra. Combine the palm oil with any remaining fish marinade and the hot chilli then pour over the contents of the pot. Bring to a simmer then cook for about 50 minutes, or until the contents of the pot are tender. Serve hot with funje (also known as funge) and palm oil beans

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    bitekuteku (amaranthe) Congo


    Bitekuteku 1 bunch (or a frozen bag)
    1 zucchini
    1 small leek
    1 onion
    1 clove garlic
    1 cube Maggi
    1 small can of tomato or a few tablespoons of tomato paste
    palm oil
    Salt and pepper

    After washing the leaves bitekuteku, chop them fairly fine.
    Put in a saucepan with water halfway up, and simmer.

    In a skillet, heat some oil palm, throw in the chopped onion, leek, crushed garlic, zucchini cut into small cubes.Laisser back a few minutes, then add tomatoes, pepper and the cube maggi.Laisser "pickling" the sauce over medium heat.

    Pour sauce into the pan bitekuteku, mix well, add salt if besoin.Laisser simmer another 15 minutes, until leaves are tender.

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    callaloo of trinidad and tobago



    Assemble and prep ingredients.

    12 dasheen (eddo/taro) leaves, cut up

    7 okra cut into 1-inch pieces

    2 Tsp salted butter

    1/4 cup diced onions

    4 pimento peppers (mild hot peppers)

    2 large crabs, quartered

    1 (3-inch) piece salt meat, cut into 1-inch pieces

    1 whole scotch bonnet pepper

    3 sprigs fresh thyme

    4 stalks green onions sliced (white and green parts)

    1 chicken bouillon, crushed

    3 cups water

    1 cup coconut milk

    Salt to taste


    Add all the ingredients, except the whole hot pepper and salt to a large pot. Cover, place on medium high heat and bring to a boil. Let cook for 15 minutes, then add hot pepper. Continue to cook covered for another 15 minutes or until everything is cooked and the vegetables are soft.
    remove the cooked crab, salt meat and whole pepper from the soup. Set aside

    Use a swizzle stick, immersion blender or food processor to puree the soup.

    Puree until the soup is smooth but it should still have some texture.


    Pour soup into bowl and garish with crab, hot pepper.

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    great thread..
    but why make two different ones?
    lalia likes this.
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

    Carl G. Jung

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    Registered User lalia is offline
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    caruru



    Caruru, made with okra, dried shrimps, dendê oil, and ground cashews is a staple of Bahian cuisine. The cooking of Bahia derives many of its dishes from the African tradition, and caruru, or very similar dishes, can be found in West Africa, the Caribbean and the Southern US.

    Caruru is a ritual food of the Candomblé religion, and is used as filling in the typical Bahian street-food acarajé. It also makes a delicious and substantial side-dish to any Bahian meal.


    2 lbs. okra, trimmed and cut into small rounds
    1 large onion, finely chopped
    2 cloves garlic
    1 Tbsp. grated fresh ginger
    1 lb. dried small shrimp (found in Asian markets), ground in food processor
    1/2 lb. roasted, unsalted, cashews, ground in food processor
    3/4 cup dendê oil
    juice of one lime
    hot water

    Heat the dendê oil in a large heavy saucepan, add the onion and garlic and fry until soft. Add the ginger and cook for an additional minute or two. Add the okra, and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the okra is soft. Add the ground shrimp and cashews, and cook for an additional five minutes. Add water just to cover. Continue to cook at low temperature, checking consistency. If the dish becomes very thick and slippery, add the lime juice. Let cook until the okra seeds change color from white to rosy-pink, about 15 minutes. Serve hot.

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