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Thread: Browni, LB, La Reina, Come in

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Browni, LB, La Reina, Come in

    Do you agree with this. I've always found the JA patois sharing pronunciations with Spanish, so I googled to find this.

    You see, Jamaican Patois is based on English and Spanish, but it is also based on African languages as well and before I forget there is also the American Arawak influence. Although, it would be unfair to discount the role of the English language, Jamaican Patois is heavily influenced by Spanish and even more by African languages. Let me see if I can shed some light on this.Think back to your Spanish Classes when you had to learn the Alphabet and how to count in Spanish. Well, that was a good lesson to begin to speak Jamaican because some of the pronunciation is identical. For example, in Spanish when you say the word twenty or Veinte, the pronunciation in many places begins with a B sound as though the word were “Beinte”. The same thing exists in Patois. For example, you might hear the word “vex” pronounced like ” bex”. The other area where you can hear Spanish in Patois is the vowel pronunciation or sounds. Most vowels in Jamaican Patois have a similar or identical pronunciation to Spanish. Just listen to some the way Jamaicans say the word “Apple” and then listen to the way a Spanish speaker says “Apple”. There is a striking similarity between the two languages. From a cultural and geographic standpoint, its clear to see the influence of the Spanish on Jamaica…Spanish Town and Ocho Rios are both major cities on the island and each has its own history and legacy.

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    Get your passport & come ! EloquenceInc is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Do you agree with this. I've always found the JA patois sharing pronunciations with Spanish, so I googled to find this.
    Yes. I've said this. It's a dialect made up of all the cultures/languages that arrived on the island...and I HAVE said before that i was doing well in my french classes because the redundant sentence structures in patois seem to have come from how the french organize their sentences, so it was not a big deal for me to remember/adapt to. And some little wordings here and there are like deja vu.

    Him a 3 year ole...

    Il a 3 ans.

    that A after him...exact same usage and meaning in french and patois.

    It's NOT a coincidence.
    La reina Baby Phat likes this.
    Who has eyes to see, let them see...

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Yes. I've said this. It's a dialect made up of all the cultures/languages that arrived on the island...and I HAVE said before that i was doing well in my french classes because the redundant sentence structures in patois seem to have come from how the french organize their sentences, so it was not a big deal for me to remember/adapt to. And some little wordings here and there are like deja vu.

    Him a 3 year ole...

    Il a 3 ans.

    that A after him...exact same usage and meaning in french and patois.

    It's NOT a coincidence.

    That means that slaves remained on the island during the transition between the Spanish and English colonizations.

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    Get your passport & come ! EloquenceInc is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    That means that slaves remained on the island during the transition between the Spanish and English colonizations.
    ? Whether slave or not the language picked up some form or function of all the languages that came...the point was to be able to talk and SOUND like you're sort of talking like them so they can understand you when YOU ready and still not have them understand you when you DON'T want them to.

    It worked. Still does for that matter.
    Who has eyes to see, let them see...

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    Registered User Missmayling's Avatar Missmayling is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    That means that slaves remained on the island during the transition between the Spanish and English colonizations.
    That is the maroons. the Spanish influence would have been strongest due to the migrant workers returning from Cuba, Costa Rica, Columbia, Panama etc. You see a similar pattern today, where Jamaicans are using more American slangs and words.
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend- Arabic proverb

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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    hmmm.. well that is doublefold in Trinidad then.. cos we still say things like "it making hot".. which is a direct translation of "hace calor" or literally "it makes hot".... lol.. or "bring me the cup" which would be "traigame el vaso"...
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Yes. I've said this. It's a dialect made up of all the cultures/languages that arrived on the island...and I HAVE said before that i was doing well in my french classes because the redundant sentence structures in patois seem to have come from how the french organize their sentences, so it was not a big deal for me to remember/adapt to. And some little wordings here and there are like deja vu.

    Him a 3 year ole...

    Il a 3 ans.

    that A after him...exact same usage and meaning in french and patois.

    It's NOT a coincidence.
    well french and spanish have a lot of commonalities, but Jamaican dialect doh really have French in it
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    I think it's a coincidence. I doubt the Spanish left much influence on Jamaica.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    I think it's a coincidence. I doubt the Spanish left much influence on Jamaica.
    why not, the Spanish really was present in Jamaica for the first 150 years, they did not leave the island idle, remember Port Royal etc
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    Get your passport & come ! EloquenceInc is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    I think it's a coincidence. I doubt the Spanish left much influence on Jamaica.
    Spanish Town was the capital of Jamaica before Kingston.

    There are Spanish names left and right in Jamaica, both in the people's names that are considered common and in the place and river names.

    Ricardo
    Bustamante
    Da Costa
    Vaz

    Oracabessa
    Catadupa
    Rio Cobre

    bumbo

    etc.

    What is with you people always assuming this and that no matter the questions asked and answers given? cho!
    Who has eyes to see, let them see...

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Spanish Town was the capital of Jamaica before Kingston.

    There are Spanish names left and right in Jamaica, both in the people's names that are considered common and in the place and river names.

    Ricardo
    Bustamante
    Da Costa
    Vaz

    Oracabessa
    Catadupa
    Rio Cobre

    bumbo

    etc.

    What is with you people always assuming this and that no matter the questions asked and answers given? cho!

    That means nothing.

    Most if not all the blacks in Jamaica are descendants of slaves who were imported by the british.

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    Registered User dedetriniking's Avatar dedetriniking is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Yes. I've said this. It's a dialect made up of all the cultures/languages that arrived on the island...and I HAVE said before that i was doing well in my french classes because the redundant sentence structures in patois seem to have come from how the french organize their sentences, so it was not a big deal for me to remember/adapt to. And some little wordings here and there are like deja vu.

    Him a 3 year ole...

    Il a 3 ans.

    that A after him...exact same usage and meaning in french and patois.

    It's NOT a coincidence.
    Fascinating!

  13. #13
    Toppa_Toppa
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Do you agree with this. I've always found the JA patois sharing pronunciations with Spanish, so I googled to find this.
    You see, Jamaican Patois is based on English and Spanish, but it is also based on African languages as well and before I forget there is also the American Arawak influence. Although, it would be unfair to discount the role of the English language, Jamaican Patois is heavily influenced by Spanish and even more by African languages. Let me see if I can shed some light on this.Think back to your Spanish Classes when you had to learn the Alphabet and how to count in Spanish. Well, that was a good lesson to begin to speak Jamaican because some of the pronunciation is identical. For example, in Spanish when you say the word twenty or Veinte, the pronunciation in many places begins with a B sound as though the word were “Beinte”. The same thing exists in Patois. For example, you might hear the word “vex” pronounced like ” bex”. The other area where you can hear Spanish in Patois is the vowel pronunciation or sounds. Most vowels in Jamaican Patois have a similar or identical pronunciation to Spanish. Just listen to some the way Jamaicans say the word “Apple” and then listen to the way a Spanish speaker says “Apple”. There is a striking similarity between the two languages. From a cultural and geographic standpoint, its clear to see the influence of the Spanish on Jamaica…Spanish Town and Ocho Rios are both major cities on the island and each has its own history and legacy.
    Jamaicans pronounce 'apple' as 'manzana'?

    Oh wow, that's certainly news to me.
    Last edited by Toppa_Toppa; 07-05-2012 at 12:28 PM.
    ladyrastafari likes this.

  14. #14
    Toppa_Toppa
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brownilus View Post
    Yes. I've said this. It's a dialect made up of all the cultures/languages that arrived on the island...and I HAVE said before that i was doing well in my french classes because the redundant sentence structures in patois seem to have come from how the french organize their sentences, so it was not a big deal for me to remember/adapt to. And some little wordings here and there are like deja vu.

    Him a 3 year ole...

    Il a 3 ans.

    that A after him...exact same usage and meaning in french and patois.

    It's NOT a coincidence.
    Was Jamaica settled by the French?

  15. #15
    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toppa_Toppa View Post
    Jamaicans pronounce 'apple' as 'manzana'?

    Oh wow, that's certainly news to me.
    yo i said the same fckin thing to myself when i read that
    Toppa_Toppa likes this.
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

    Velvet Glove. Iron Fist

    mi style still sharp .....u a A-Minor and dem a B-Flat

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