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Thread: Blaxploitation Trailers From The 1970s

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Blaxploitation Trailers From The 1970s

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    COrnbread Earl and Me was not a Blaxploitation film
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

    Carl G. Jung

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello BKLYN View Post
    COrnbread Earl and Me was not a Blaxploitation film
    Why wasn't it?

    Because Fishbourne was in it?

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    hmm i gotta get me some of these movies on Netflix
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

    Carl G. Jung

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello BKLYN View Post
    hmm i gotta get me some of these movies on Netflix
    I would never in a million years watch any of these movies.

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Why wasn't it?

    Because Fishbourne was in it?
    No, cause it wasnt about exploitin a bunch of negative stereotypes to make a buck... its a movie more along the lines of Sounder and ummm whats that move with Sicily Tyson.. i forgot the name..
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

    Carl G. Jung

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    that reminds me, i memorized this whole thing in the 6th grade

    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

    Carl G. Jung

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hello BKLYN View Post
    No, cause it wasnt about exploitin a bunch of negative stereotypes to make a buck... its a movie more along the lines of Sounder and ummm whats that move with Sicily Tyson.. i forgot the name..
    Really?

    A black youth's only way out of the hood is to become a pro basketball player isn't a negative stereotype?

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    Searching For Answers Hello BKLYN is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Really?

    A black youth's only way out of the hood is to become a pro basketball player isn't a negative stereotype?
    the movie wasnt saying his only way out the hood was basketball... he just happened to be getting out the hood by playing basketball, but that really wasnt what the story was about... it was more about police brutality and police misconduct... the basketball thing was just part of the protagonists character..
    the healthy man does not torture others - generally it is the tortured who turn into torturers.

    Carl G. Jung

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    Registered User Ananci_7 is offline
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    I have to agree with Hello Bklyn (although there is some merit to Opti's arguments too); Cornbread shouldn't be classed as a "blaxploitation" movie (the exploitation os basketball and sports as a way of "making it" can be considered in a a negative light though).

    However, Opti, I wouldn't be so judgmental of many of these blaxploitation movies you say you will never go to see. You have to remember the realities of the times in which they were made, starting with the one touted as the first of the blaxploitation movies: Sweet Sweetback, Badaaasss Song by Melvin Van Peebles, Mario's iconic father. This was a period when racism and police brutality were still very much institutionalised in the US and there were very few positive black leading actors in Hollywood. Activists like the great Paul Robeson did his part when he was an actor in the 1930s and 40s, but the envelope needed to be pushed further in a culture where aggression was associated with power, rightness and heroism.

    Sweetbaack was a huge hit because nothing like that was really seen on the silver screen before (keeping in mind that the movies play a large part in ordering US social values and consciousness). Look past the (really cheesy) productions and look at the underlying themes: in most of them you see a black leading actor beating and often killing a white male or being intimate with a white woman; you, Opti (and even me as I'm only 43) will never know just how profound is that imagery in a deeply racist, misogynist and violent society of the US of the 1960s and 70s; how profound is the message that resonated among a class of people, black and white. Look at Pam Grier, you could never understand how her characters sent a message of a woman, and a black woman at that, taking charge of behaviours associated with (white) masculinity; how her characters also showed a woman in control of her sexuality - something that still isn't where it should be even in 2012. These were and still are very controversial themes. There were parts of the US where these movies could not have been shown.

    So don't beat up on them too hard, times were very different then. Yes, they were quickly taken over and the stereotypes exploited by the white and Jewish power elite, but they paved the way for the Spike Lees and John Singletons of today (and that's why Lee cusses Perry so much, he knows -- perhaps a little too much -- the history of the Steppin Fetchit and Mammy genres that preceded the Blaxploitation genre). After watching Fire in Babylon and Empires of Cricket: West Indies, I don't think it's heretical to say that what WI cricket was to us and the three generations before me, Foxy Brown, Black Caesar, Shaft, Superfly, Jim Brown, Jim Kelly, Fred Williamson, Pam Grier, was to Black America.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ananci_7 View Post
    I have to agree with Hello Bklyn (although there is some merit to Opti's arguments too); Cornbread shouldn't be classed as a "blaxploitation" movie (the exploitation os basketball and sports as a way of "making it" can be considered in a a negative light though).

    However, Opti, I wouldn't be so judgmental of many of these blaxploitation movies you say you will never go to see. You have to remember the realities of the times in which they were made, starting with the one touted as the first of the blaxploitation movies: Sweet Sweetback, Badaaasss Song by Melvin Van Peebles, Mario's iconic father. This was a period when racism and police brutality were still very much institutionalised in the US and there were very few positive black leading actors in Hollywood. Activists like the great Paul Robeson did his part when he was an actor in the 1930s and 40s, but the envelope needed to be pushed further in a culture where aggression was associated with power, rightness and heroism.

    Sweetbaack was a huge hit because nothing like that was really seen on the silver screen before (keeping in mind that the movies play a large part in ordering US social values and consciousness). Look past the (really cheesy) productions and look at the underlying themes: in most of them you see a black leading actor beating and often killing a white male or being intimate with a white woman; you, Opti (and even me as I'm only 43) will never know just how profound is that imagery in a deeply racist, misogynist and violent society of the US of the 1960s and 70s; how profound is the message that resonated among a class of people, black and white. Look at Pam Grier, you could never understand how her characters sent a message of a woman, and a black woman at that, taking charge of behaviours associated with (white) masculinity; how her characters also showed a woman in control of her sexuality - something that still isn't where it should be even in 2012. These were and still are very controversial themes. There were parts of the US where these movies could not have been shown.

    So don't beat up on them too hard, times were very different then. Yes, they were quickly taken over and the stereotypes exploited by the white and Jewish power elite, but they paved the way for the Spike Lees and John Singletons of today (and that's why Lee cusses Perry so much, he knows -- perhaps a little too much -- the history of the Steppin Fetchit and Mammy genres that preceded the Blaxploitation genre). After watching Fire in Babylon and Empires of Cricket: West Indies, I don't think it's heretical to say that what WI cricket was to us and the three generations before me, Foxy Brown, Black Caesar, Shaft, Superfly, Jim Brown, Jim Kelly, Fred Williamson, Pam Grier, was to Black America.

    You made some good points.

    The NAACP weren't a fan of them though.

    Don't forget that there was an era where blacks weren't portrayed in stereotypical roles. You ever heard of race films?

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