Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Black Incomes Surpass Whites in Queens

  1. #1
    coeur Chillybebee's Avatar Chillybebee is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    'round de bend next to the end.
    Posts
    2,348
    Credits
    1,022,248

    Black Incomes Surpass Whites in Queens

    The Cambria Heights neighborhood in Queens, a county that belies the “stereotype of blacks living in dangerous, concentrated, poor, slum, urban neighborhoods,” one policy expert says.

    Across the country, the income gap between blacks and whites remains wide, and nowhere more so than in Manhattan. But just a river away, a very different story is unfolding.

    Kenneth C. Holder, elected to a judgeship last year, says he could move from Queens, “but why?”

    In Queens, the median income among black households, nearing $52,000 a year, has surpassed that of whites in 2005, an analysis of new census data shows. No other county in the country with a population over 65,000 can make that claim. The gains among blacks in Queens, the city’s quintessential middle-class borough, were driven largely by the growth of two-parent families and the successes of immigrants from the West Indies. Many live in tidy homes in verdant enclaves like Cambria Heights, Rosedale and Laurelton, just west of the Cross Island Parkway and the border with Nassau County.

    David Veron, a 45-year-old lawyer, is one of them. He estimates that the house in St. Albans that he bought with his wife, Nitchel, three years ago for about $320,000 has nearly doubled in value since they renovated it. Two-family homes priced at $600,000 and more seem to be sprouting on every vacant lot, he says.

    “Southeast Queens, especially, had a heavy influx of West Indian folks in the late 80’s and early 90’s,” said Mr. Veron, who, like his 31-year-old wife, was born on the island of Jamaica. “Those individuals came here to pursue an opportunity, and part of that opportunity was an education,” he said. “A large percentage are college graduates. We’re now maturing and reaching the peak of our earning capacity.”

    Richard P. Nathan, co-director of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government in Albany, called Queens “the flip side of the underclass.”

    “It really is the best illustration that the stereotype of blacks living in dangerous, concentrated, poor, slum, urban neighborhoods is misleading and doesn’t predominate,” he said.

    Andrew A. Beveridge, a Queens College demographer who analyzed results of the Census Bureau’s 2005 American Community Survey, released in August, for The New York Times, said of the trend: “It started in the early 1990’s, and now it’s consolidated. They’re married-couple families living the American dream in southeast Queens.”

    In 1994, an analysis for The Times found that in some categories, the median income of black households in Queens was slightly higher than that of whites — a milestone in itself. By 2000, whites had pulled slightly ahead. But blacks have since rebounded.

    The only other places where black household income is higher than among whites are much smaller than Queens, like Mount Vernon in Westchester, Pembroke Pines, Fla.; Brockton, Mass.; and Rialto, Calif. Most of the others also have relatively few blacks or are poor.

    But Queens is unique not only because it is home to about two million people, but also because both blacks and whites there make more than the national median income, about $46,000.

    Even as blacks have surged ahead of whites in Queens, over all they have fallen behind in Manhattan. With the middle class there shrinking, those remaining are largely either the wealthy, who are predominantly white, or the poor, who are mostly black and Hispanic, the new census data shows.

    Median income among blacks in Manhattan was $28,116, compared with $86,494 among whites, the widest gap of any large county in the country.

    In contrast, the middle-class black neighborhoods of Queens evoke the “zones of emergence” that nurtured economically rising European immigrants a century ago, experts say. “It’s how the Irish, the Italians, the Jews got out of the slums,” Professor Nathan said.

    Despite the economic progress among blacks in Queens, income gaps still endure within the borough’s black community, where immigrants, mostly from the Caribbean, are generally doing better than American-born blacks.

    “Racism and the lack of opportunity created a big gap and kind of put us at a deeper disadvantage,” said Steven Dennison, an American-born black resident of Springfield Gardens.

    Mr. Dennison, a 49-year-old electrical contractor, has four children. One is getting her doctoral degree; another will graduate from college this school year. “It starts with the school system,” Mr. Dennison said.

    Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

    By SAM ROBERTS
    Blessed

  2. #2
    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    10,174
    Credits
    1,061,421

  3. #3
    coeur Chillybebee's Avatar Chillybebee is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    'round de bend next to the end.
    Posts
    2,348
    Credits
    1,022,248
    Blessed

  4. #4
    Registered User marabunta is offline
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    US
    Posts
    8,337
    Credits
    93,732
    It's not a good idea to be bragging about Successful Black Neighborhoods.........

    ..........these Beast MudderfuKKKers BOMBED the last successful Black neighborhood FROM THE AIR:
    http://seaburn.com/black_wallstreet.htm

  5. #5
    Registered User Daveed's Avatar Daveed is offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Trinidad
    Posts
    1,464
    Credits
    49,463
    Forgive us Father for we truly did not know what we had done.
    We did not know that we were brothers
    And we are brothers to Your Son
    Forgive us Father for we truly do not know what we have done...



    Quote Originally Posted by marabunta View Post
    It's not a good idea to be bragging about Successful Black Neighborhoods.........

    ..........these Beast MudderfuKKKers BOMBED the last successful Black neighborhood FROM THE AIR:
    http://seaburn.com/black_wallstreet.htm

  6. #6
    Registered User Daveed's Avatar Daveed is offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Trinidad
    Posts
    1,464
    Credits
    49,463
    Thats what I am talking about!
    We are proving that what they said is lies.
    Nothing can hold us back when we believe we can make it and we refuse to listen to all the dotishness they tell us; but instead get off our arses and do de darm ting!!!.


    Quote Originally Posted by Chillybebee View Post
    The Cambria Heights neighborhood in Queens, a county that belies the “stereotype of blacks living in dangerous, concentrated, poor, slum, urban neighborhoods,” one policy expert says.

    Across the country, the income gap between blacks and whites remains wide, and nowhere more so than in Manhattan. But just a river away, a very different story is unfolding.

    Kenneth C. Holder, elected to a judgeship last year, says he could move from Queens, “but why?”

    In Queens, the median income among black households, nearing $52,000 a year, has surpassed that of whites in 2005, an analysis of new census data shows. No other county in the country with a population over 65,000 can make that claim. The gains among blacks in Queens, the city’s quintessential middle-class borough, were driven largely by the growth of two-parent families and the successes of immigrants from the West Indies. Many live in tidy homes in verdant enclaves like Cambria Heights, Rosedale and Laurelton, just west of the Cross Island Parkway and the border with Nassau County.

    David Veron, a 45-year-old lawyer, is one of them. He estimates that the house in St. Albans that he bought with his wife, Nitchel, three years ago for about $320,000 has nearly doubled in value since they renovated it. Two-family homes priced at $600,000 and more seem to be sprouting on every vacant lot, he says.

    “Southeast Queens, especially, had a heavy influx of West Indian folks in the late 80’s and early 90’s,” said Mr. Veron, who, like his 31-year-old wife, was born on the island of Jamaica. “Those individuals came here to pursue an opportunity, and part of that opportunity was an education,” he said. “A large percentage are college graduates. We’re now maturing and reaching the peak of our earning capacity.”

    Richard P. Nathan, co-director of the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government in Albany, called Queens “the flip side of the underclass.”

    “It really is the best illustration that the stereotype of blacks living in dangerous, concentrated, poor, slum, urban neighborhoods is misleading and doesn’t predominate,” he said.

    Andrew A. Beveridge, a Queens College demographer who analyzed results of the Census Bureau’s 2005 American Community Survey, released in August, for The New York Times, said of the trend: “It started in the early 1990’s, and now it’s consolidated. They’re married-couple families living the American dream in southeast Queens.”

    In 1994, an analysis for The Times found that in some categories, the median income of black households in Queens was slightly higher than that of whites — a milestone in itself. By 2000, whites had pulled slightly ahead. But blacks have since rebounded.

    The only other places where black household income is higher than among whites are much smaller than Queens, like Mount Vernon in Westchester, Pembroke Pines, Fla.; Brockton, Mass.; and Rialto, Calif. Most of the others also have relatively few blacks or are poor.

    But Queens is unique not only because it is home to about two million people, but also because both blacks and whites there make more than the national median income, about $46,000.

    Even as blacks have surged ahead of whites in Queens, over all they have fallen behind in Manhattan. With the middle class there shrinking, those remaining are largely either the wealthy, who are predominantly white, or the poor, who are mostly black and Hispanic, the new census data shows.

    Median income among blacks in Manhattan was $28,116, compared with $86,494 among whites, the widest gap of any large county in the country.

    In contrast, the middle-class black neighborhoods of Queens evoke the “zones of emergence” that nurtured economically rising European immigrants a century ago, experts say. “It’s how the Irish, the Italians, the Jews got out of the slums,” Professor Nathan said.

    Despite the economic progress among blacks in Queens, income gaps still endure within the borough’s black community, where immigrants, mostly from the Caribbean, are generally doing better than American-born blacks.

    “Racism and the lack of opportunity created a big gap and kind of put us at a deeper disadvantage,” said Steven Dennison, an American-born black resident of Springfield Gardens.

    Mr. Dennison, a 49-year-old electrical contractor, has four children. One is getting her doctoral degree; another will graduate from college this school year. “It starts with the school system,” Mr. Dennison said.

    Suzanne DeChillo/The New York Times

    By SAM ROBERTS

  7. #7
    coeur Chillybebee's Avatar Chillybebee is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    'round de bend next to the end.
    Posts
    2,348
    Credits
    1,022,248
    lol @ the post above.

    I'm glad that my brothers & sisters are achieving success.
    Blessed

  8. #8
    D First HD Jumbie SocaBandit's Avatar SocaBandit is offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    T&T
    Posts
    801
    Credits
    3,276
    few blocks from where I live

  9. #9
    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    10,174
    Credits
    1,061,421
    Most of them are Caribbean. African Americans need to reignite that similar drive that led to many successful towns before the Black Holocaust in the Jim Crow era destroyed them.

  10. #10
    sweeter than honey arimagal72's Avatar arimagal72 is offline
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    1,537
    Credits
    1,011,583
    Quote Originally Posted by Otorongo View Post
    Most of them are Caribbean. African Americans need to reignite that similar drive that led to many successful towns before the Black Holocaust in the Jim Crow era destroyed them.
    I second that notion. I have heard to may of my American associates, (not the majority) state that they feel as if the government owes them something and make all kind of excuses for not succeeding and bettering themselves. Then try to put the blame on us West Indians for coming here and supposedly taking their jobs.

    My response is always, when was the last time you took a job for minimum wage to clean somebody chile shit or some ole man or oman bottom. We Islanders come here to progress and we start at the bottom of the barrel, but that does not mean we stay there, hence we progress to bigger and better jobs.

    I live in NJ and you can tell the difference between the average black American owned home and the West Indian owned home. We work hard and deserve to create a community where we all prosper and are safe.

  11. #11
    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    10,174
    Credits
    1,061,421
    Or what about the person that indigenizes. Say the son of a diplomat who grows up in your hometown with your people. His lifestyle and perception is majorly influenced by the same culture and environment as you, yet he is Asian, White or something else not Black.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •