Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3111213
Results 181 to 189 of 189
Like Tree82Likes

Thread: Black Celebrities Who Say They’re Not African American

  1. #181
    Registered User SKBai1991's Avatar SKBai1991 is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,780
    Credits
    11,357,279
    Quote Originally Posted by Mrs. Campbell View Post
    This isn't rocket science.
    You would think so yet somehow I'm always surprised by people. especially people on imix.
    "sa ki ta'w sé ta'w, la rivié pé pa chayé'l "


    Father, before mi mind get bad
    Betta yuh flip it round and mek mi mind get mad
    Mi prefer fi work hard everyday fi achieve mi goals
    Nah grudge nobody fi dem own

  2. #182
    Registered User Missmayling's Avatar Missmayling is offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Long island, ny
    Posts
    6,780
    Credits
    55,532,810
    Quote Originally Posted by SKBai1991 View Post
    Can you blame them when for 5 of those 10 generations they were property, and for 3 of the remaining 5 they were second-class citizens who were legally excluded from participating in that society?

    Furthermore why does one have to come first before the other? why can't they be equally important?
    and your slave ancestors were doing what during that time period? on an all expense paid vacation in the sunny Caribbean? Didn't know colonial rule treated Blacks as first class citizens compared to whites and colored.
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend- Arabic proverb

  3. #183
    Registered User Missmayling's Avatar Missmayling is offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Long island, ny
    Posts
    6,780
    Credits
    55,532,810
    Quote Originally Posted by antiguad View Post
    I have a friend from Liberia who I met who I would have SWORN was from the US until she told me differently.
    Met a few Liberian AA as well and because of their ancestry, they are considered Americans with US citizenship. Not sure about the AA who left during the underground railroad or were maroons. I guess It would be harder for that group to prove American heritage.
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend- Arabic proverb

  4. #184
    Warrior Queen NikkiGiovanni's Avatar NikkiGiovanni is offline
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    brooklyn
    Posts
    17,826
    Credits
    78,441,244
    Quote Originally Posted by Missmayling View Post
    and your slave ancestors were doing what during that time period? on an all expense paid vacation in the sunny Caribbean? Didn't know colonial rule treated Blacks as first class citizens compared to whites and colored.
    lol...so you are trying to say that the conditions and circumstances were the same in the U.S and Caribbean post-slavery?
    you ALL AGREE with my opinion, which is why NONE of you ever EFFECTIVELY DISPUTE IT

    you ONLY have faith in the WOMEN'S ability to ELEVATE which is why you only FOCUS ON WOMEN...you ALL have long given up on Black men

    you just don't have the BALLS to OVERTLY AGREE....rather just do it INDIRECTLY

    weak men only can deal with weaker women

    in the presence of strength you diminish...

  5. #185
    Registered User SKBai1991's Avatar SKBai1991 is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,780
    Credits
    11,357,279
    Quote Originally Posted by Missmayling View Post
    and your slave ancestors were doing what during that time period? on an all expense paid vacation in the sunny Caribbean? Didn't know colonial rule treated Blacks as first class citizens compared to whites and colored.
    Regardless of whether or not we were politically or economically dominant, we were still dominant culturally and numerically and that makes a HUGE difference vis-à-vis being a segregated minority. There's a reason why even in the late 19th century people remarked that Black West Indians had very different attitudes in comparison to Black Americans, that we were "uppity" and upwardly mobile.
    "sa ki ta'w sé ta'w, la rivié pé pa chayé'l "


    Father, before mi mind get bad
    Betta yuh flip it round and mek mi mind get mad
    Mi prefer fi work hard everyday fi achieve mi goals
    Nah grudge nobody fi dem own

  6. #186
    Registered User SKBai1991's Avatar SKBai1991 is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    5,780
    Credits
    11,357,279
    Quote Originally Posted by antiguad View Post
    Make up your mind. Either we didn't have an identity OR identities have shifted. You can't have both.

    And PS - the identities of EVERY COUNTRY changes over a few generations. England 1914 would be SUBSTANTIALLY different than in 2014. We're talking dress, dialect/language, food, cultural practices, etc.

    The fact that national identity has shifted over the past hundred years does NOT mean that you had none 100 years ago!

    My statement still stands as accurate: even though they were not independent, our islands had a strong sense of INDIVIDUAL culture 100 years ago.
    Firstly, when did I say we had no identity? I don't know where you're pulling this from but nowhere did I say we had no identity.

    Secondly, societies change but the identity of every society doesn't necessarily change over the course of generations. Like I mentioned in my previous example, an Englishman born in 1880 and one born in 1980 may have differences in attitude and in dress, but a Trini born in 1880 and one born in 1980 on a fundamental level wouldn't be able to even communicate with each other despite being born and raised in the same place.
    "sa ki ta'w sé ta'w, la rivié pé pa chayé'l "


    Father, before mi mind get bad
    Betta yuh flip it round and mek mi mind get mad
    Mi prefer fi work hard everyday fi achieve mi goals
    Nah grudge nobody fi dem own

  7. #187
    Registered User Missmayling's Avatar Missmayling is offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Long island, ny
    Posts
    6,780
    Credits
    55,532,810
    Quote Originally Posted by NikkiGiovanni View Post
    lol...so you are trying to say that the conditions and circumstances were the same in the U.S and Caribbean post-slavery?
    lol, lol, lol, lol lol...... The economic conditions were worse in the caribbean if you compared it with Blacks in the north. As you know, Blacks migrated north to avoid the jim crow laws and for work. Wages were much better, which also attracted WI and African immigrants to the US. In the South, WI immigrated there to do migrant work, and many southerners have WI ancestry because of that. Now the Caribbean didn't have segregated signs up, but there were places that Blacks were not allowed like certain hotels, schools, Jobs etc. If you weren't colored or white, you were discriminated like what you saw in the US. This is why if you look at the upper classes or old money in the Caribbean, they tend to be light skin or mixed Blacks.
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend- Arabic proverb

  8. #188
    Registered User antiguad is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Antigua
    Posts
    1,152
    Credits
    42,073,171
    Quote Originally Posted by SKBai1991 View Post
    Firstly, when did I say we had no identity? I don't know where you're pulling this from but nowhere did I say we had no identity.

    Secondly, societies change but the identity of every society doesn't necessarily change over the course of generations. Like I mentioned in my previous example, an Englishman born in 1880 and one born in 1980 may have differences in attitude and in dress, but a Trini born in 1880 and one born in 1980 on a fundamental level wouldn't be able to even communicate with each other despite being born and raised in the same place.
    Firstly, when did I say we had no identity? I don't know where you're pulling this from but nowhere did I say we had no identity
    You said that you disputed what I said in a previous post. What exactly were you disputing?

    Secondly, societies change but the identity of every society doesn't necessarily change over the course of generations.
    What's your definition of identity? Plenty of countries communicate far differently than they did a hundred years ago(looking for example at North Wales). The fact that a Trinidadian communicates significantly differently does not mean that those 100 years ago (save for recent immigrants) did not identify strongly with their country. Going back further than that, during slavery era, is of course a totally different dynamic because we were ALL immigrants (save a few select countries) who were literally owned by Britain or other territories.

  9. #189
    Registered User Missmayling's Avatar Missmayling is offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Long island, ny
    Posts
    6,780
    Credits
    55,532,810
    Quote Originally Posted by SKBai1991 View Post
    Regardless of whether or not we were politically or economically dominant, we were still dominant culturally and numerically and that makes a HUGE difference vis-à-vis being a segregated minority. There's a reason why even in the late 19th century people remarked that Black West Indians had very different attitudes in comparison to Black Americans, that we were "uppity" and upwardly mobile.
    who are these people?
    The enemy of my enemy is my friend- Arabic proverb

Page 13 of 13 FirstFirst ... 3111213

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •