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Thread: Barbados benefitted while the rest of the West Indies suffered?

  1. #1
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Barbados benefitted while the rest of the West Indies suffered?

    DISCLAIMER: This is not my opinion, this is an online opinion that had me thinking.

    Why Barbados is more successful than the rest?

    You want the truth? Because Barbados has stayed true its roots and adheard to British traditions.

    I know it sounds radical, but this has been looked at before. Islands in the Caribbean that have adheard to the British or other European values and traditions have tended to do better than the ones which have rebelled against everything Eurocentric. That's just a fact.


    The nations in the region that have rebelled against everything British, everything French etc. are the ones that now struggle to find their place in the global economy. They in essence took everything that was seen as colonial, and they shunned or turned their back on it.
    Unfortunantly for them in taking such a path; the culture left behind by the colonisers is the same stuff that forms the basis of the global economy. So those nations pretty much shoot themselves in the foot.

    In the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s many of Barbados' neighbours (Namely Guyana, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica) decided they had enough of the Eurocentric/western system. The Black power movements began to rock those nations and they decided that they were going to chart their own paths. As an experiment of sorts they forcibly took over the banking system in their countries. Literally snatching it directly out of the hands of foreign investors and nationalising it for themselves. This never works unfortunately because other investors become fearful and quickly pull their money out fast.

    Lucky for Trinidad and Tobago once they ended this experiment they had oil, gas, ammonia and other aspects of the petrochemical industry as a backup to put their country slowly back on track. Guyana and Jamaica are getting there slowly but they haven't been as lucky as T&T in that regard.

    Barbados luckily didn't engage in that socialism experiment. It has stuck to what it knows and adopted new aspects when it needs to.

    The whole world is shaped around Eurocentric ideas or morals/values so the countries which are following these ways have prospered. The Asian economies are a perfect example of this as they become more westernised. They have lock stock and barrel aligned themselves to the Western/Eurocentric model as a blueprint for their economies and as a result they have reaped the rewards too.

    When people come to Barbados to conduct business it feels familiar to them because of the prevalence of the British culture.

    Everything in place today in Barbados has been tried and tested. The Father of Independence Errol Barrow was the one that decided that just like England all Barbadians should have the *same access* to Education and Healthcare so he put in place much of the basis for the nationalised health system and free Education that Barbadians are entitled to today. Regardless of class, race, ethnic background etc. you are entitled to that in Barbados. All subsequent Governments in Barbados have adhead to this too.

    In terms of Barbadians "not moving overseas" that isn't exactly true. Barbados has had a number of instances of emigration.

    Almost the entire Irish/Caucasian population that was in Barbados emigrated during the 1600s to North and South Carolina for example. Not many people remember but it was Barbadians that practically founded those two states.

    When Britain took over Guyana from the Dutch a number of Barbadians moved to Guyana to help populate that new territory.

    During the construction of the Panama Canal a number of Barbadians moved from Barbados to take higher paying jobs in Panama. (My grandfather was among them.)

    When a number of blacks in the Caribbean told Britain they wanted the right to return to the continent of Africa a number of Barbadians took the option of going back to what is now Sierra Leone.

    Right before independence a large number of Barbadians funnelled out of Barbados for Canada, England, and the United States.

    More recently Bermuda continues to hire a number of Bar-Bajans to work on the Bermuda police force today...

    New York City continues to hire Barbadians teachers in large numbers to work there.

    Canada, the United States, and England continue hiring Caribbean nurses at a feverish pace leading to the (now) nursing shortage you now see in the Caribbean.

    Barbadians have done lots- of emigration all through-out history.

    In terms of the policy and strength of the Barbados dollar this was inherited partly through Britain. Almost all currencies in the British West Indies were higher than the U.S. dollar even. They were tied to the gold standard. Once they un-cuppled from that standard their currencies have slowly lost value over time. Luckily Barbados has ignored the advice coming out of Washington D.C. that Barbados should devalue its currency. Jamaica too the advice and recently their currency hit JM$90 to US$1. Guyana took the advice too and their currency now is something like GY$200 to US$1. Barbados has held its rate steady of US$0.50 = Bds$1 (or US$1.00 = Bds$1.98) since the 1970s thanks in large part due to the island having well educated economists that have done their best to maintain the stability of the currency. The IMF and World Bank stated to Barbados after a number of years that Barbados was wise to have not devalued it's currency because it has served the country well after all.
    Source(s):
    Me.
    The longer the British territories were tired to Britain the better off they are today. Unless they got hit by some catastrophic event (like Montserrat.)
    The other remaining territories like Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Island and other current territories of Britain have higher standards of living now than Barbados. They wouldn't be on the United Naiton HDI report though because they aren't "countries".

    In the words of a Bermudian politician a couple years ago. The person said something like-- "With the Americans to fuel our economy and the British to keep us safe, who really needs independence anyway?"
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  2. #2
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Who wrote this?

    It's an opinion piece with no facts provided.


    Barbados is successful for a myriad of reasons. Many of them are coincidental.
    antiguad and SKBai1991 like this.

  3. #3
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Who wrote this?

    It's an opinion piece with no facts provided.


    Barbados is successful for a myriad of reasons. Many of them are coincidental.
    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/in...1135914AAjzd5W

    BUT this person is saying some of the same things that i said, Barbados never underwent a social experiment or radicalism.

    it followed the status quo
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  4. #4
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Do foreign investors account for the high literacy rate of the island?

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Do foreign investors account for the high literacy rate of the island?
    are your not understand what the person is saying, r u not understanding what I have been saying in past threads?
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

  6. #6
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    are your not understand what the person is saying, r u not understanding what I have been saying in past threads?
    I understand what's being said. I just don't agree with it.

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    This paper is a better explanation.

    Barbados entered Independence with a relatively well-established institutional framework for the delivery of social programmes. In key areas such as education, health, housing and employment, the structural and administrative arrangements for service delivery were already sound and therefore facilitated the programme of institutional strengthening and consolidation which was devised in the post-Independence period towards increased effectiveness and efficiency. It is within the philosophical and institutional context that the principles of universalism and social welfare as a citizenship right came to dominate social policy formulation in Barbados.

    It is clear that successive Barbadian governments have appreciated the positive relationship between human welfare and development and this has led to the consistent and substantial allocation of resources to the social services. This appreciation together with important institutional and socio-cultural features of Barbadian society have created that mutually supportive positive relationship between social and economic development and has been largely responsible for the relatively high quality of life that its citizens enjoy.

    In the area of health policy, Barbados has adopted a reformist and incremental approach. The decentralisation of primary health care through the polyclinic system and the establishment of a National Drug Service programme have been pivotal initiatives in giving effect to universal access to basic health care. In addition, there has been the consistent development of specific institutional and programme responses to challenges such as HIV/AIDS, solid waste disposal, the expanding proportion of elderly in the population, the changing morbidity profile and the increasing demand for secondary and tertiary health care. Importantly, the overarching philosophy of social development has facilitated the management of new structural features of health care programming without compromising the integrity of health policy and programme delivery.
    Analysis of Economic and Social Development in Barbados: A Model for SIDS

  8. #8
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    An assessment of the economic and social development of Barbados since the 1960s therefore points to the following factors which have contributed to its success:

    A high level of investment in human resource development (education, training, health and nutrition);
    The establishment of a well-functioning social and physical infrastructure (roads, ports, telecommunications, etc);
    The maintenance of political stability and a liberal democratic tradition with respect for the rule of law and the seamless transition from one administration of government to another;
    The lack of social disharmony, ethnic, class and racial conflict;
    The promotion of ‘social capital’, that is, social networks, social cohesion and trust which serve a ‘bonding function’ within groups and a ‘bridging function’ with other groups;
    Strong leadership on political, business (private sector) and labour union fronts;
    The ability to use the investment in human capital to effect social mobility (i.e., occupational mobility);
    The good management of the country by well-trained economic and social technicians and administrators. The technicians and administrators in government have focused on sound economic management and development planning. There have been no extremes in the political and economic management of the county;
    A well-established communications and public information system which allows the engagement of the population in public discussion;
    The establishment of efficient, effective institutional and incentives framework to regulate economic and social activities and promote national development;
    The socio-cultural features of the population that permit national discipline, diligence, respect for law and order, social cohesion and pride;
    The ability to take advantage of special measures offered by the international economy (e.g., trade preferences) and the maintenance of good international relations with key world institutions.
    ...

  9. #9
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    do you like to argue for arguing sake or because you have a point? the two excerpts that you posted proved my point about the lack of ethnic and social conflicts

    How could Barbados have ethnic conflict and strife while the islands is near ethnically homogenous?

    Trinidad had a PM who was blatantly and vociferously opposed to the "massa rule", Dr. Williams said " Massa Day Done" he engendered a feeling of strong dislike for massa rule while Barbados embraced it

    Also, when did Barbados have a revolution or social upheaval? Barbados never experimented with disregarding the british system, they capitalised on it.

    they did invest in human capital unlike the others
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

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    Dragon Singh IslandmixUSA's Avatar IslandmixUSA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    do you like to argue for arguing sake or because you have a point? the two excerpts that you posted proved my point about the lack of ethnic and social conflicts

    How could Barbados have ethnic conflict and strife while the islands is near ethnically homogenous?

    Trinidad had a PM who was blatantly and vociferously opposed to the "massa rule", Dr. Williams said " Massa Day Done" he engendered a feeling of strong dislike for massa rule while Barbados embraced it

    Also, when did Barbados have a revolution or social upheaval? Barbados never experimented with disregarding the british system, they capitalised on it.

    they did invest in human capital unlike the others
    Bingo

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    Dragon Singh IslandmixUSA's Avatar IslandmixUSA is offline
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    I laugh every time I watch English Football an see the visit Barbados AD , Do you know under Bajan law radio stations must play 60% Bajan music so less money goes to foreign countries for royalties

  12. #12
    Registered User antiguad is offline
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    The post is full of incorrect information.

    First off, many of the other EC countries are doing well economically.

    Secondly, the poster says that "socialism" is what was responsible for the downfall of the other countries, while the truth is, Barbados adheres more highly to the socialist model than other countries in terms of things like free health care and education.

    Thirdly, and most importantly, Barbados developed (as has been pointed out earlier) because of the development of human, rather than natural resources. Almost every country (bar Trinidad) that has decided to depend on agriculture/mineral resources has NOT done well. Other countries which have switched to a services (as opposed to goods production) model has - e.g. Antigua, St Lucia (to an extent) Cayman, etc.
    optimizm and SKBai1991 like this.

  13. #13
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by antiguad View Post
    The post is full of incorrect information.

    First off, many of the other EC countries are doing well economically.

    Secondly, the poster says that "socialism" is what was responsible for the downfall of the other countries, while the truth is, Barbados adheres more highly to the socialist model than other countries in terms of things like free health care and education.

    Thirdly, and most importantly, Barbados developed (as has been pointed out earlier) because of the development of human, rather than natural resources. Almost every country (bar Trinidad) that has decided to depend on agriculture/mineral resources has NOT done well. Other countries which have switched to a services (as opposed to goods production) model has - e.g. Antigua, St Lucia (to an extent) Cayman, etc.
    Human capital is the key to success.

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