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Thread: Asiyen and Tikeroyal, look at this

  1. #1
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Asiyen and Tikeroyal, look at this

    This is a dissertation by a grad student. The thesis is centered around the migration history of Haitians to Cuba. This migration is often overlook by historians. In the early 20th century, over 200,000 Haitians migrated to work the sugar fields. To put things into perspective, Haitians were faced with a dilemma on whether to remain and rural Haiti and have a low standard of living or endure mistreatment by sugar employers in Eastern Cuba.


    One thing I find worth noting is that it was mentioned how British West Indians were fortunate to organize and union to combat substandard labor conditions while Haitians had no support from Cuban natives or Haitian officials back home.



    This dissertation is a social history of the approximately 200,000 individuals who migrated seasonally between their homes in rural Haiti and the eastern regions of Cuba during the height of the United States’ military and economic presence in both countries. Existing scholarship explains Haitians’ movements in terms of the United States’ military presence in Haiti (1915-1934), the country’s rural poverty, and the massive growth of U.S.- and Cuban-owned sugar plantations in Cuba. However, the migrants themselves have not been studied. Instead, previous scholarship puts forth an image of Haitian migrants that is heavily influenced by false, long-standing assumptions about Haiti and the anti-immigrant stereotypes of the early 20th-century Cuban press. They are portrayed as a homogenous group of unskilled laborers who remained at the bottom of labor hierarchies, were isolated from other groups in Cuban society and were dominated by Cuban sugar companies and state officials in both countries. Due to their high rates of illiteracy, the life stories of the migrants are difficult to reconstruct using traditional sources such as letters or diaries. Drawing on research conducted in multiple archives and libraries in Cuba, Haiti, and the United States, my dissertation details migrants’ experiences in both Haiti and Cuba. It joins a rapidly growing body of scholarship on labor, migration, and trans-nationalism in Latin America and the Caribbean that seeks a fuller understanding of workers’ lives by emphasizing economic activities and coping strategies that occurred outside of formal wage activities and union mobilization. I show the ways that Haitian men and women navigated the harsh working and living conditions in both Haiti and Cuba by creating and maintaining kinship, commercial, religious, and social networks in sugar plantations, coffee farms, and urban spaces. These links cut across national lines and decisively shaped the conditions under which they moved, labored, and lived in both countries. Reconstructing Haitians’ interactions with other workers outside the gazes of company and state illustrates how those institutions functioned on the ground, questions the extent to which national-level racial ideologies determined local social relationships, and demonstrates how workers’ actions shaped the implementation of migration and trade policies.
    From Haiti to Cuba and Back: Haitians' Experiences of Migration, Labor, and Return, 1900-1940 - D-Scholarship@Pitt

  2. #2
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Well the answer is in the dissertation the British West Indians got help through their "British" status. Haitian officials have always had way too much going on in Haiti to worry about what's going on elsewhere unfortunately. This is no different from whats going on in the Dominican Republic. What is worth noting is as long as everything stands, Haitians will continue to invade Cuba & the Dominican Republic and Haitianize the place
    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  3. #3
    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by tikreyol View Post
    Well the answer is in the dissertation the British West Indians got help through their "British" status. Haitian officials have always had way too much going on in Haiti to worry about what's going on elsewhere unfortunately. This is no different from whats going on in the Dominican Republic. What is worth noting is as long as everything stands, Haitians will continue to invade Cuba & the Dominican Republic and Haitianize the place
    is this a good thing ?
    GREATNESS IS ALL I KNOW

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Asiyen, you missed this thread?

  5. #5
    Registered User Ayisyen's Avatar Ayisyen is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Asiyen, you missed this thread?
    I have to co-sign tikreyol's response. Haitian authorities simply had too much to worry about in Haiti, let alone focus their priorities on the treatment of Haitian migrants. Plus the dissertation itself states the British West Indians had advantages by being subjects of the British crown. It gave them a voice to organize their complaints, hence their ability to participate in Cuban labor unions.

    Most Haitians probably didn't join the union created by British West Indians because they felt the union would only protect those that was of British interest, aka subjects of the British crown.


    P.S. Is tikreyol and ayisyen really THAT difficult to spell..?

  6. #6
    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayisyen View Post
    I have to co-sign tikreyol's response. Haitian authorities simply had too much to worry about in Haiti, let alone focus their priorities on the treatment of Haitian migrants. Plus the dissertation itself states the British West Indians had advantages by being subjects of the British crown. It gave them a voice to organize their complaints, hence their ability to participate in Cuban labor unions.

    Most Haitians probably didn't join the union created by British West Indians because they felt the union would only protect those that was of British interest, aka subjects of the British crown.


    P.S. Is tikreyol and ayisyen really THAT difficult to spell..?
    lol

    Are they French names?

  7. #7
    Registered User Ayisyen's Avatar Ayisyen is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    lol

    Are they French names?
    Lol nah these names are written in Kreyol Ayisien(Haitian Creole).
    tikreyol likes this.

  8. #8
    Registered User SKBai1991's Avatar SKBai1991 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ayisyen View Post
    P.S. Is tikreyol and ayisyen really THAT difficult to spell..?

    lmao I was wondering the same thing...dude butchered yall names HARD
    "sa ki ta'w sé ta'w, la rivié pé pa chayé'l "


    Father, before mi mind get bad
    Betta yuh flip it round and mek mi mind get mad
    Mi prefer fi work hard everyday fi achieve mi goals
    Nah grudge nobody fi dem own

  9. #9
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    is this a good thing ?
    it has it's positives and negatives.
    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  10. #10
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SKBai1991 View Post
    lmao I was wondering the same thing...dude butchered yall names HARD
    they do it on purpose to try and irritate us. podyab we are never bothered by moun kokorat.
    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

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