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Thread: Which Anglo Caribbean accent has the strongest affinity of African influence?

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Which Anglo Caribbean accent has the strongest affinity of African influence?

    I think it's a tossup between the Bajan and Jamaican.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    I think it's a tossup between the Bajan and Jamaican.
    I would say the only person that could sound really african is the Cuban Jamaican bajan New Yorker orlando African American
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    Earth Angel dollbabi's Avatar dollbabi is offline
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    Again?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    I would say the only person that could sound really african is the Cuban Jamaican bajan New Yorker orlando African American


    What happened?

    You mad I didn't mention Trinidad?

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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    I would say the only person that could sound really african is the Cuban Jamaican bajan New Yorker orlando African American
    good one
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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    What happened?

    You mad I didn't mention Trinidad?
    U r childish, I don't see nothing in a bajan accent that sounds "African"
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    U r childish, I don't see nothing in a bajan accent that sounds "African"
    You're hard of hearing. The Bajan accent has strong African affinities.

    I don't even think you've met a Bajan before.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    You're hard of hearing. The Bajan accent has strong African affinities.

    I don't even think you've met a Bajan before.
    I won't even go further with you, I am of bajan ancestry and was always familiar with the accent from a baby.
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    Unlike Jamaica, Guyana or Trinidad, Barbados was the destination of few African-born slaves after 1800.[8] Thus, African blacks became "Bajanized" relatively early on in the island's history. This tended to make them less resistant to local culture, with its Anglicised language, religion and customs.

    As in most English-based Caribbean creoles, the interdentals /θ/ and // have merged with other consonants (in this case, /t/ and /d/, respectively).[11] Unlike most other Caribbean creoles[citation needed], Bajan is rhotic[citation needed]. Bajan has a strong tendency to realize word-final /t/ as a glottal stop [ʔ]. Thus the Bajan pronunciation of start, [stɑːɹʔ], contrasts sharply with the pronunciation of other Caribbean speakers[citation needed], [staːt] or [stɑːt] or [staːɹt][citation needed].
    The word for you (plural) is wuna, similar to Jamaican unnu / unna or Bahamian yinna. Unlike Standard English, Bajan tends towards using a zero copula.
    Questions are usually pronounced as a statement with a raised intonation; usually on the last word; to indicate that it is a question e.g. Wunna win de cricket? means "Did you (pl.) win the cricket match?"; dah you own? means "Is that yours?"
    Habitual actions are usually indicated by the word does and done, for example I does guh church punna Sunduh means "I go to church on Sundays", or I done guh church pon Sunduh "I went to church on Sunday". It is quite common for this to be shortened to I's guh church pun Sunduh.[citation needed]
    Verbs in Bajan are not conjugated for tense, which is inferred from time words e.g. I eat all de food yestuhday = "I ate all of the food yesterday", where the word yesterday indicates that the action happened in the past.[citation needed]
    The word gine is usually used to mark the future tense e.g. I gine eat = "I am going to eat".[citation needed]
    Ain't (frequently shortened to ain') is used as a negative marker e.g. "I didn't do that" becomes I ain' do dat/dah. It is not uncommon for the I and the ain' to be pronounced in Bajan as "Ah'n" i.e. "Ah'n do dah" or "Ah'n able".


    Maybe Swaggerific could enlighten himself.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Maybe Swaggerific could enlighten himself.
    You just shoot urself in the foot and don't even realize
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    readin btwn da lines Farinborn's Avatar Farinborn is offline
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    How can any of them sound African when they were taught English by the same Europeans that colonized Africa? I would say thatmanyof them have a few words from Africa intertwined with the local dialect of the W.I. But to sound African..........

    The Africans don't even sound the same when speaking English....you ever heard a Ghanaian and a Nigerian argue............?
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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farinborn View Post
    How can any of them sound African when they were taught English by the same Europeans that colonized Africa? I would say thatmanyof them have a few words from Africa intertwined with the local dialect of the W.I. But to sound African..........

    The Africans don't even sound the same when speaking English....you ever heard a Ghanaian and a Nigerian argue............?
    Opti's brain is fried
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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farinborn View Post
    How can any of them sound African when they were taught English by the same Europeans that colonized Africa? I would say thatmanyof them have a few words from Africa intertwined with the local dialect of the W.I. But to sound African..........

    The Africans don't even sound the same when speaking English....you ever heard a Ghanaian and a Nigerian argue............?
    Anything that doesn't sound indigenous to standard English is more than likely African. At least in the Caribbean

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    readin btwn da lines Farinborn's Avatar Farinborn is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by optimizm View Post
    Anything that doesn't sound indigenous to standard English is more than likely African. At least in the Caribbean
    So according to your insert, we all speaking African when we type or vocalize in the following manner.........

    You want ah bumbuu.c.l.a.t box inna you head weh favor on drop dung coconat....Ndis yah tred nuh mek it star. Is like unno ah reach fi di knife an nuh know seh ah di blade you grab.....
    One tree makes a thousand match sticks, but one match stick can burn a thousand trees

    When you truly are conscious in the knowing of yourself, your divine nature which is God as your Soul, there is no fear whatsoever.

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    Registered User Inquistive is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Farinborn View Post
    So according to your insert, we all speaking African when we type or vocalize in the following manner.........

    You want ah bumbuu.c.l.a.t box inna you head weh favor on drop dung coconat....Ndis yah tred nuh mek it star. Is like unno ah reach fi di knife an nuh know seh ah di blade you grab.....
    Yeah, pretty much


    I'm not gonna play Devil's Advocate with you though.

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