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Thread: African Americans in Media Stereotype

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    Boonoonoonoos jamaicangirl's Avatar jamaicangirl is offline
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    African Americans in Media Stereotype

    Question for those who read literature (including modern fiction).

    Stereotypes of African Americans in the United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Its just wikipedia but I think that they have a fairly accurate description. I read alot and notice that white women or Asian women are always portrayed as intelligent, thin and sophisticated. Black women are usually "sassy" or "magical".

    Black men don't seem to appear as often in books but when they do, they seem to have more normal roles. They are, however, one dimensional compared to white characters.

    I couldn't find the other thread on this topic. Ok to merge if someone can find it....

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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    i dont think in the books i read (suspense/thriller/horror/drama) that black people are even mentioned yes.... i dont even recall much detail paid to race unless they describe somebody as blonde or red haired... the books generally have a negligible racial component... and in those urban books a friend of mine likes to read, the black people always seem to have some sort of drama, drugs involved somehow in the story, some kinda dishonesty or cheating, somebody have a controlling mother or grandmother or the woman have an attitude... same stories that they portray on film...
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

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    Registered User Catracha305's Avatar Catracha305 is offline
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    I read lots of urban fiction. There is a pretty accurate portrayal of African American's in that genre. Some of them have lots of drama in their lives, but who wants to read a fiction book that doesn't have drama??
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    readin btwn da lines Farinborn's Avatar Farinborn is offline
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    How real is the stereotype? I think the "fiction" is reinforcing the stereotype n vice versa. The books about all this drama are depressing. I steer more to scoring or history. At least those books give a glimmer of hope as to how black folks can devolop.
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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    i dont like urban books... to me, it glamorizes the foolishness, but then again that's no different from shows like LHHATL etc... i just dont want to read about tanequa who's a good girl growing up went to college, then met Derrell, the cousin of her hairstylist, who has a secret (either he selling drugs, taking drugs, or on the downlow).. he's been hurt before so he's hard now.... she ignore him at first cos she been hurt too, they dont hit it off, they find each other disgusting, she find he so common, he find she so stuck up wtih an attitude - typical black chick, his boys say forget that bia! .. her girls say forget that scrub.. but they can't stop thinkin about each other.. they lose touch, then see each other out one night on the town.. either, one of the does something the other one like and then they start dating. or they have one passionate night of romance and things change.. then (dum dum dum dummmmm) , something happen, (he get locked up, some old buss-it-baby get pregnant for him, his babymother act up, his controlling mama get involved or her old bf realize he cant live without her and propose) and they can;t be together, then she or him have to decide if it's worth it... .. it's always the same ole shit.. i cant stand those books.. then again, i dont really care too much for romance, unless it's a sideline to an already existing plot.. this fairytale assness is why so many chicks get caught up wtih these bum niccas.. reading ish like that.. lol..

    Gimme some far out shit to read, a good mystery or thriller or legal fiction.. something else.. i work around that type of crazy drama, i do not need to read about it! lol
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    Heri DSP's Avatar DSP is offline
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    I read sci-fi, how to/training books, and history novels so I don't get alot of stereotyping. The current sci-fi crop seems to have alot more black or more mixed race characters than anything if not ambiguous, but then again it plays around with genes and chromosome terminology so you get human like beings with only 42 chromosomes or you get some other far out beings who have 5or 6 genders in their race....lol.
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    Registered User BacchanalDiva's Avatar BacchanalDiva is offline
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    Not a fan of urban fiction tho if it's what I get my hands on for a waiting room, DMV or plane ride, I'll admit I'll go w/ it. Agree w/ LR plus most of it is really badly written, it's like low budget fiction lol. Part of the problem tho, is there is only so much you can come up w/ to weave a story based on those stereotypes, gets old too quick.
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    Registered User sankofaa's Avatar sankofaa is offline
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    Registered User Catracha305's Avatar Catracha305 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladyrastafari View Post
    i dont like urban books... to me, it glamorizes the foolishness, but then again that's no different from shows like LHHATL etc... i just dont want to read about tanequa who's a good girl growing up went to college, then met Derrell, the cousin of her hairstylist, who has a secret (either he selling drugs, taking drugs, or on the downlow).. he's been hurt before so he's hard now.... she ignore him at first cos she been hurt too, they dont hit it off, they find each other disgusting, she find he so common, he find she so stuck up wtih an attitude - typical black chick, his boys say forget that bia! .. her girls say forget that scrub.. but they can't stop thinkin about each other.. they lose touch, then see each other out one night on the town.. either, one of the does something the other one like and then they start dating. or they have one passionate night of romance and things change.. then (dum dum dum dummmmm) , something happen, (he get locked up, some old buss-it-baby get pregnant for him, his babymother act up, his controlling mama get involved or her old bf realize he cant live without her and propose) and they can;t be together, then she or him have to decide if it's worth it... .. it's always the same ole shit.. i cant stand those books.. then again, i dont really care too much for romance, unless it's a sideline to an already existing plot.. this fairytale assness is why so many chicks get caught up wtih these bum niccas.. reading ish like that.. lol..

    Gimme some far out shit to read, a good mystery or thriller or legal fiction.. something else.. i work around that type of crazy drama, i do not need to read about it! lol
    Which urban fiction books are you referring to? I don't recall reading too many books what a story line like that. Have you ever heard of Eric Jerome ################ey? Mary Monroe? Carl Weber?
    Make peace with yourself and then you can make peace with the world

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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    yes to the authors and there is always that same ole theme... just read some of the previews for these books..
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

    Velvet Glove. Iron Fist

    mi style still sharp .....u a A-Minor and dem a B-Flat

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    Registered User Catracha305's Avatar Catracha305 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladyrastafari View Post
    yes to the authors and there is always that same ole theme... just read some of the previews for these books..
    Not with those authors. Not at all. Perhaps you should read more than the previews, because those statements do not apply any of those authors. There is some garbage and redundant themes in the black fiction community, but not all. Especially from those authors.
    Make peace with yourself and then you can make peace with the world

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catracha305 View Post
    Which urban fiction books are you referring to? I don't recall reading too many books what a story line like that. Have you ever heard of Eric Jerome ################ey? Mary Monroe? Carl Weber?
    Read a book from him "Genievieve" (check spelling)..was a really good read

  13. #13
    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catracha305 View Post
    Which urban fiction books are you referring to? I don't recall reading too many books what a story line like that. Have you ever heard of Eric Jerome ################ey? Mary Monroe? Carl Weber?
    Quote Originally Posted by ladyrastafari View Post
    yes to the authors and there is always that same ole theme... just read some of the previews for these books..
    Quote Originally Posted by Catracha305 View Post
    Not with those authors. Not at all. Perhaps you should read more than the previews, because those statements do not apply any of those authors. There is some garbage and redundant themes in the black fiction community, but not all. Especially from those authors.
    Sorry..... let's take ... eric jerome D... please tell me when those "issues" that i pointed out don't surface.... mmkay


    When a black man meets a white woman and they fall in love, sometimes there are more pressing matters that concern them than the predictable fuss over an interracial relationship. The latest novel from the popular ################ey (Friends and Lovers) is as much about relationships as it is about race. Both Jordan Greene, a 30ish engineer, and Kimberly Chavers, a 28-year-old artist, have thorny connections with friends, former lovers and relatives that they must unravel before they can even begin to think about a life together. For Jordan, there is his on-again, off-again relationship with fiery J'nette, who says she is carrying his baby. There is his friendship with his confidant Solomon, who is engaged to J'nette's best friend but may be less trustworthy than he seems. Then there is Jordan's family. When he flies from New York to his native small town of Brownsville, Tenn., to attend the funeral of his ex-stepfather, Jordan is caught in the thick of family woes. His half-brother, Reggie, has finally checked into a drug rehabilitation program but only after casting their older brother, Darrell, into bankruptcy. In the rural South, where racial tensions are more frightening and immediate than Jordan remembers, he must not only suffer his older brother's harangues against dating white women but also do so while loaning him money. Kimberly, meanwhile, is trying to rid herself of an obnoxious, white ex-boyfriend and come to grips with a secret past that she fears will make Jordan doubt her love for him. By the time she shows Jordan her skeletons, makes up with a troubled family of her own and faces down violence on the streets of New York, ################ey has demonstrated once again his easy mastery of dialogue and voice (both romantic leads share narrator's honors with an omniscient third-person) and his cheerful, wittily acerbic eye for the troubles that plague lovers in the 1990s.

    like i said before... same themes- baby mama drama, family issues, drugs, somebody have a secret... because this woman white there is no "angry sista that need to be broken down to know how to love".. it's like reading a mills and boon where you KNOW.. the woman getting captured by the man and at first she fight against him cos she hate him then as time goes on she start falling for him, a little bit of sex on page 100, and basically teh shrew has been tamed.. she usually brings him civility and he teachers her how to love a "savage, brute man"...lol.. u kno what to expect..
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

    Velvet Glove. Iron Fist

    mi style still sharp .....u a A-Minor and dem a B-Flat

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    Notchilous ladyrastafari's Avatar ladyrastafari is offline
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    and... trust me i read eric jerome dckey... ad some of them other urban authors.. and its just not for me.. my friend loves em.. i say okay do ya thing ma..
    Never waste your time trying to explain who you are to people who are committed to misunderstanding you.

    Velvet Glove. Iron Fist

    mi style still sharp .....u a A-Minor and dem a B-Flat

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    Registered User Catracha305's Avatar Catracha305 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladyrastafari View Post
    Sorry..... let's take ... eric jerome D... please tell me when those "issues" that i pointed out don't surface.... mmkay


    When a black man meets a white woman and they fall in love, sometimes there are more pressing matters that concern them than the predictable fuss over an interracial relationship. The latest novel from the popular ################ey (Friends and Lovers) is as much about relationships as it is about race. Both Jordan Greene, a 30ish engineer, and Kimberly Chavers, a 28-year-old artist, have thorny connections with friends, former lovers and relatives that they must unravel before they can even begin to think about a life together. For Jordan, there is his on-again, off-again relationship with fiery J'nette, who says she is carrying his baby. There is his friendship with his confidant Solomon, who is engaged to J'nette's best friend but may be less trustworthy than he seems. Then there is Jordan's family. When he flies from New York to his native small town of Brownsville, Tenn., to attend the funeral of his ex-stepfather, Jordan is caught in the thick of family woes. His half-brother, Reggie, has finally checked into a drug rehabilitation program but only after casting their older brother, Darrell, into bankruptcy. In the rural South, where racial tensions are more frightening and immediate than Jordan remembers, he must not only suffer his older brother's harangues against dating white women but also do so while loaning him money. Kimberly, meanwhile, is trying to rid herself of an obnoxious, white ex-boyfriend and come to grips with a secret past that she fears will make Jordan doubt her love for him. By the time she shows Jordan her skeletons, makes up with a troubled family of her own and faces down violence on the streets of New York, ################ey has demonstrated once again his easy mastery of dialogue and voice (both romantic leads share narrator's honors with an omniscient third-person) and his cheerful, wittily acerbic eye for the troubles that plague lovers in the 1990s.

    like i said before... same themes- baby mama drama, family issues, drugs, somebody have a secret... because this woman white there is no "angry sista that need to be broken down to know how to love".. it's like reading a mills and boon where you KNOW.. the woman getting captured by the man and at first she fight against him cos she hate him then as time goes on she start falling for him, a little bit of sex on page 100, and basically teh shrew has been tamed.. she usually brings him civility and he teachers her how to love a "savage, brute man"...lol.. u kno what to expect..
    That book , Milk in my coffee, was written in 1998. Have you read any Eric Jerome D books since then?? Apparently not. He has grown so much as a writer since then. He was written 23 books since then. Alot of his books don't even have black people as main characters. His storylines are full of adventure, suspense, mystery..very similar to an action movie. Like those movies Colombiana and Man of Fire.

    On another note, you still have not addressed the topics on books by Mary Monroe and Carl Weber. Have you read any of their books? These are all leaders in the black fiction community.

    I feel that you think that I am trying to attack you. That is not the case. The message that I am trying to get across is that one should do more research (reading the previews, or one book that was written 10 years ago is not good enough), before they make strong "blanket statements" about any genre, race, culture, etc.
    Make peace with yourself and then you can make peace with the world

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