Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Adenike: Caribbean kids were mean to me !

  1. #1
    Alliouagana Garveyite soca_souljah's Avatar soca_souljah is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    JEW YORK...Stolen from Africa though
    Posts
    3,198
    Credits
    1,021,961

    Exclamation Adenike: Caribbean kids were mean to me !

    Black Britons are often grouped together under the term Afro-Caribbean, but things are not always that harmonious between our African and Caribbean communities. And, while this divide is based on ego and rivalry, rather than the ignorance and deep-rooted hatred that drives racism, it is still a cause for concern.

    A provocative new play at Dalston's Arcola theatre explores this subject in depth. Produced by actor and upcoming writer Femi Oguns, Torn is a modern day Romeo and Juliet, centring on teenage lovers, David, of Nigerian parentage and Natasha, from a Caribbean background. The young couple get caught up in their families' refusal to accept the relationship based on cultural prejudice, ignorance and intolerance.

    As a British-born woman of Nigerian parentage, the play's themes are very familiar to me. At primary school, the fact my name sounded different, and that English was not my parent's first language, made my brothers and me a target for unprovoked teasing from some of our West Indian classmates. We expected it from white pupils, from whom we also received it. But, sadly, instead of our cultural attributes being viewed as enriching, they were used by some of our fellow black pupils to fuel an ignorant depiction of Africa as one large jungle, where people spoke a funny language and roamed about naked with the animals. We should have been united in the fact that our skin colour often meant our white counterparts treated us less favourably.

    Throughout my time at primary school I was uncomfortable with my African background. Friends of a similar age and heritage whom I met years later had much the same experience. In fact the son of a friend of my mum's felt so troubled he began using a fake English-sounding name.

    But this culture clash was in no way one-sided. At home my own parents frequently referred to West Indians as "uneducated", "thieves" and "troublemakers" - still a common view held in African households across Britain. As I got older I gained a further glimpse into how West Indians viewed us. Some of them saw us as arrogant and patronising, based on another stereotype that Africans were more studious than Caribbeans.

    This year marks 200 years since the abolition of the slave trade. Because of this trade, Africa has become linked over the centuries with a time when black people were defenceless, weak and treated inhumanely. Some West Indians choose not to acknowledge Africa as the birthplace of their ancestors because of this and in turn look down on the continent's direct descendants. Africans, on the other hand, feel superior in the knowledge that they know their exact ethnic origins and have strongly defined languages, traditions and identities.

    Thankfully, today's second and third generation black Britons are much more tolerant and appreciative of their different cultures, and the number of relationships between Africans and Caribbeans is steadily increasing. In part this was down to the African explosion that occurred in the late 1980s and 1990s. This was fuelled by events such as Nelson Mandela being freed from prison, the introduction of black history month, which shed a new and more balanced light on the continent's history, and the consciousness movement in the US, which led to the new identity, "African-American".

    But despite the noticeable progression, a lot of the negative attitudes are likely to hang around for years - just one of the legacies of the divide-and-rule tactics employed by the slave masters hundreds of years ago. As with skin tone, hair type and nose size, being born in a different part of the world is just another reason to compete with each other. And, as history has borne out, in this "competition" there are no winners.


    Comment is free: Notes on disharmony
    Last edited by soca_souljah; 02-23-2008 at 02:37 PM.
    Agitate until we create a stable society that benefits all our people.
    Instigate the nation until we remedy the injustices of society.
    Motivate our people to set a meaningful path for coming generations.
    Educate our people to free our minds and develop our consciousness

    Mwongozi Cudjoe (Chedmond Browne)
    Chairman of Free Montserrat United Movement

  2. #2
    Boonoonoonoos jamaicangirl's Avatar jamaicangirl is offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    6,825
    Credits
    11,591,897
    Yes. I never really knew alot of Africans when I was back home but they were considered to be almost savages by many people. Even with the pervasive obsession with Ethiopia....

    All of the Africans that I first met in America were noble, kind and proud. It wasn't until I was in grad school that I realized that many of them really hate and look down on non-African blacks. That was when I learned the word "Acatta".

    I would love to see that play.

  3. #3
    D'Original Puttury Lucian Nickyan's Avatar Nickyan is offline
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    kai mwen...340
    Posts
    2,258
    Credits
    1,010,252
    This year marks 200 years since the abolition of the slave trade. Because of this trade, Africa has become linked over the centuries with a time when black people were defenceless, weak and treated inhumanely. Some West Indians choose not to acknowledge Africa as the birthplace of their ancestors because of this and in turn look down on the continent's direct descendants. Africans, on the other hand, feel superior in the knowledge that they know their exact ethnic origins and have strongly defined languages, traditions and identities.
    woooooow! this hit home to me! not that i've ever looked down on them.

  4. #4
    ........ G.T. socalova's Avatar G.T. socalova is offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    4,866
    Credits
    1,016,034
    Quote Originally Posted by jamaicangirl View Post
    Yes. I never really knew alot of Africans when I was back home but they were considered to be almost savages by many people. Even with the pervasive obsession with Ethiopia....

    All of the Africans that I first met in America were noble, kind and proud. It wasn't until I was in grad school that I realized that many of them really hate and look down on non-African blacks. That was when I learned the word "Acatta".

    I would love to see that play.
    Yes, they don't consider us African at all and if you try and claim African as part of your heratige, they look at you as if yuh crazy.

  5. #5
    Registered User pennywhine's Avatar pennywhine is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    guantanamo bay
    Posts
    2,330
    Credits
    3,340,167
    good subject...........i would have to say that certain africans have this we are better than you mentality when it comes to their view of children of slaves as some like to call us...

    but i find its not all of them thats like that,i have good friends from Ghana,madagascar(hope that is spelled right)and the ivory coast.....now not to generalize but i find a lot of nigerians fall into that(we better than you)trap......


    i wonder where are most of these (better than you)brothers and sisters that everyone is talking about from........almost willing to bet that the majority of them are nigerian.......!!!

    esp if they are of the EBO TRIBE.....someone care to differ???

  6. #6
    Registered User RivaNaija is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Cold Azz Midwest
    Posts
    1
    Credits
    1,055,448
    wtf? and what's an ebo tribe? someone enlighten me. maybe you, pennywhine, should. seem to be a wealth of information.

  7. #7
    Banned ken_yatta is offline
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    558
    Credits
    1,010,408
    I don't have a problem with continental Africans. one of my aunts is even married to a Nigerian and I've heard that some Africans say that Guyanese and Nigerians make the best couples. I once went out with a visiting Nigerial girl from London who turned out to be very arrogant. She was also very "proper and English" and a Christian. I have friends from Kenya, Congo and Ghana that are very cool and they all refer to Blacks from the diaspora as Africans. The Ethiopians tend to have more issues than West Africans, though its not good to generalized. Remember, we've all been brainwashed and view each other through European eyes.

  8. #8
    Gangsta Boogie Bake n Shark's Avatar Bake n Shark is offline
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    My business, Population...1
    Posts
    39,910
    Credits
    1,020,185
    Quote Originally Posted by RivaNaija View Post
    wtf? and what's an ebo tribe? someone enlighten me. maybe you, pennywhine, should. seem to be a wealth of information.
    Igbo....formerly spelled Ibo. Shit, them "elitist" even towards their own fellow Nigerians, but it's never that simple, I think many of us just hear the non-Igbo side.

    The Igbos were always a very proud and often inclusive people and that rubbed other Nigerians the wrong way, much like Trinis rub some other West Indians the wrong way. The Hausas and Fulanis saw them as elitist and for that the Igbo were persecuted in a genocidal campaign not unlike what we saw in Rwanda, The Congo and now Kenya.

  9. #9
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Brick City, NJ
    Posts
    24,667
    Credits
    40,139,677
    kids are mean [fullstop]

  10. #10
    where de crix Oneshot's Avatar Oneshot is offline
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Brick City, NJ
    Posts
    24,667
    Credits
    40,139,677
    Quote Originally Posted by ken_yatta View Post
    I don't have a problem with continental Africans. one of my aunts is even married to a Nigerian and I've heard that some Africans say that Guyanese and Nigerians make the best couples. I once went out with a visiting Nigerial girl from London who turned out to be very arrogant. She was also very "proper and English" and a Christian. I have friends from Kenya, Congo and Ghana that are very cool and they all refer to Blacks from the diaspora as Africans. The Ethiopians tend to have more issues than West Africans, though its not good to generalized. Remember, we've all been brainwashed and view each other through European eyes.
    you ever considered that people are just ethnocentric?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •