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Thread: A Tribute to A Haitian legend Antoine Rosini Jean Bapstiste ” Ti-manno”

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    Registered User Seawall's Avatar Seawall is offline
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    A Tribute to A Haitian legend Antoine Rosini Jean Bapstiste ” Ti-manno”

    I must admit that I never really listened to Ti Manno's music until recently (though I have some of his songs on compilations). I also didn't realize how highly regarded he was to Haitians and kompa music. So, I've been playing catch up and trying to get his music that available through various mp3 retailers.

    A Tribute to A Haitian legend Antoine Rosini Jean Bapstiste ” Ti-manno” | The Haitian Post

    In the long history of Haitian Music there has never been a figure more singular than Antoine Rosini Jean Baptiste, better known as Timanno. Twenty six years after his death, you can still hear and feel the power of his music through the timeless melody and powerful messages in his songs. Timanno was a gifted singer, composer, and arranger. He was the most charismatic Haitian performer of his time, and his music enthralled generations of konpa music ( popular Haitian music) fans. Timanno’s unique talent and deliberating music continues to resonate with millions of Haitians and French Caribbean’s.
    Timanno was a genius, ahead of his time, a musical prophet, a visionary, and revolutionist. His lyrics did not only examine and elucidate the vices and cite the lack of progress thereof in Haiti, but his music also sheds lights on the human condition, African unity, freedom, exploitation, corruption, immorality, and discrimination. Unlike many other popular Haitian singers in his time; Timanno’s had the courage to denounce the ambiguous nature of Haitian society. He understood his role as an artist and the power of his music, which he used effectively to appeal to people’s consciousness. He was the first Haitian singer to denounce sexual harassment and discrimination in the work place through his songs.
    Although Timanno’s musical career was short-lived, but his contribution to Haitian music and society was enormous and must not be forgotten. By the time of his death on May 13, 1985 (at the age of 32); Timanno had become a national icon and the most recognized and influential voice in the Haitian music industry.
    His songs have universal appeal and possess a therapeutic effect on everyone who####listens to them. Timanno’s talent as both a singer and a songwriter transcends all boundaries. Referring to the inhuman treatment Haitian immigrants are subjected when they arrive on the soil of certain countries. Timanno wrote in his song “####Nan Danje( mp3), ” we are in danger wherever we go: whether it’s in the United States, Nassau, Bahamas, Venezuela, Peru, Canada, Bolivia. We are in danger. Although we helped many of these nations to gain their independence, yet they show very little gratitude, instead they treat us like second class citizen. They use Haiti’s poverty status as a stigma to isolate and humiliate us. I will never forget December 26, 1981, the most humiliate day in my life, when U.S immigration officials publicly humiliated Haitian migrants as they arrived on Florida’s shore. They had their dogs sniffing and attacking my poor Haitian brothers and sisters, it hurts me”. Today, Timanno would have been outraged by the way Haitian migrants are treated by both U.S immigration and American media .
    The song “Nan Dange” ( we are in danger) had inspired two American anthropologists, Nina Glick-Schiller and Georges Fouron; to name an entire movement after him, “Ti Manno and the Emergence of a Haitian Transnational Identity”. “The lyrics of Ti Manno, a popular Haitian singer, and the short-lived Ti Manno movement are examined in order to elucidate the factors that shape the multiple and overlapping identities of Haitian immigrants. It is argued that, as black immigrants, Haitians tend to be “transnational” who form identities that allow them to accommodate to and resist realities of race and class in both Haiti and the United States”, wrote Nina Glick- Schiller and Georges Fouron in their research article that was published in the American Ethnologist in 1990 .
    In the mid-1980′s during a time when there was a growing AIDS crisis in the United States and other affluent Western countries. Haitian were inexplicably stigmatized and named “AIDS Carriers” by the so-called AIDS experts and other world health organizations. During that same time period, FDA regulation excluded Haitians from donating blood, a ban that was eagerly challenged by Haitians across the world. On April 20, 1990, nearly a million Haitian converge on Brooklyn Bridge to protest this unfounded accusation. Although the ban was later repealed by the FDA, but the damaged was already done. Haitians were or are still subjected social ostracism, discrimination, and injustice.
    Timanno was the first world and Haitian artist who attempted to dispel this myth and denounced theAIDS stigmatization (mp3)####which seek to target and discrete an entire nation and ethnic group. Timanno wrote, ” Disease has caused concerns for mankind since the beginning of civilization. A disease has no nationality, no absolute physical entity; yet American officials have a tendency to falsely accuse small developing nations when they have no scientific explanation for certain problems. American: AIDS, SIDA ( creole), 3H, did not originate from Haiti, American you need to find your cure for AIDS . Numerous scientific studies have shown that Haitians are not responsible for the HIV virus, yet you continue to falsely accuse us. American you need to find your cure for AIDS. Babylon holds your tongue and find your cure for AIDS”. Timanno was keenly aware of his environment, and he understood his role as an artist. He used his microphone and songwriting abilities to demand respect, equality, and a better life for his nation and its people.
    Although Timanno’s name is not well recognized in the English speaking Caribbean nations and Western countries, but Timanno’s deep humanity, social lyrics, and nfluence on French Caribbean music has made his life legendary. He left behind a remarkable reservoir body of recorded work, which refers to almost every conceivable situation or crisis….

    Antoine Rosini Jean Baptiste’s aka Timanno musical career has spanned over 15 years. Timanno began his professional musical career with ” Les Diables du rythme de Saint-Marc, Les Jouvenceau, and Astro ” in the early 1970′s; he left the group to become part of Massachusetts’ most successful Haitian band, Volovo De Boston. He was featured as one of the lead vocalists on Volovo’s first album “Rivie Si Malo”. The hit songs “Rivièm Simato” and “Regrets” helped him to gain national recognitions.
    After experiencing success with the group Volovo, Timanno returned home in 1978 where he later joined the dynamic group D.P Express De Petion Ville. It was there that Timanno made his mark as a serious song writer and composer. By the time DP Express released the hit album David (the title of album referred to hurricane David’s impact on Haiti in 1979). The album was considered as one of the greatest konpa album of all time, the smash hit songs “David”, “Corrige”, “E, E, E, E”, and “Ansanm Ansanm” dominated the airwaves. Timanno’s vocal talent and magnetism as a performer propelled him into national stardom.
    So popular did he become after the success of David that at the end of 1981 Timanno left D.P Express to form his own group “Gemini All Stars”. With the help of the talented keyboardist, Ansito Mercier, now a member of the group Kreyol La, Timanno established his successful solo career. During the summer of 1982, the group released the album entitles “Largent” one of the best and fastest-selling albums in the 80′s. The infectious lyrics and enthusiasm of the group’s performance captured the public’s imagination and propelled the record to number one on the Haiti’s music charts.
    Under pressure from the Duvalier Regine, Timanno relocated in the United Sated as his####popularity was at its peak. He recorded several albums where he addressed many social issues affecting Haitians both at home and abroad. All of his songs were inspirational and meant something to those of us who grew listening to his music in the mid 1980s.
    One of my personal favorites from Timanno’s rich archive is the song entitles “Canter (The boat)####“. The lyrics in the song warned “rural Haitian peasant” (fleeing economic regression and a fragile and brutal political system) about the dangerous and sometimes tragic journey by the sea to reach the shores of South of Florida. “Taking a wooden boat is a great danger; you sold everything you have to pay for the trip, while you left your family in distress. The trip often claimed many lives; those who made it to the refugee camps still faced struggle, racism, and hardships in their quest for economic freedom. You must stop cutting the tree to build boat; and invest in agriculture. With GOD grace, you will survive and send your kids to school.You need to work land and improving your life”, depicted one of the many Timanno’s powerful messages.
    Timanno was Haiti’s most engaging singer and composer; he was well respected and loved by the people of Haiti. Timanno was often referred to as “The Haitian Bob Marley” by many of his fans. Although no others artists really compare to Bob Marley’s mystic and influence on world music, Timanno was nonetheless a musical prophet, and a legend in his own right in the eyes of many Haitians
    Two year before his death Timanno paid a compelling tribute to one of his favorite artists, Bob Marley, arguably one of the greatest figures in World music. “If a genius has one generation, Bob Marley is still with us. From his reggae music he has left for us a musical heritage, which cannot be forgotten . He (Bob Marley) did not work just for himself, unlike the others he works (ed) for freedom, progress, and respect of all Black People”, wrote Timanno in his song “Hommage A Bob Marley ( listen to the mp3)“. The same can be said about Timanno’s legacy
    Last edited by Seawall; 08-23-2011 at 10:04 PM.
    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

    “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters.” Frederick Douglass

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    Registered User Seawall's Avatar Seawall is offline
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    Some videos by the great singer.






    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

    “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet depreciate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters.” Frederick Douglass

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