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Thread: Haitian Méringue

  1. #1
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Haitian Méringue

    As requested:

    Haiti is the birthplace of a variety of music styles such as, meringue, compas, cadence, troubadour, and Racines (Roots) which includes rara and sacred voodoo songs. The influence of some of these music styles can be felt in Paris, South America, west Africa, America and the Caribbean.

    MERINGUE

    The meringue is originally a syncretism of Spanish and African roots which belongs to the group of quintelet (cinquillo) but can be played as 2/4. The slow meringue has the danza influence, while the fast meringue incorporates African and Creole (carabinier) elements. The Haitian meringue, the ancestor of the Dominican merengue, is spelled with an (i) while the merengue is written with an (e). (meringue/merengue.) The meringue was introduced to the eastern part of the Island, where it is played faster, during 1822-1844.

    The meringue, under the conduct of father and son, Occilius and Occide Jeanty, evolved in marching bands (brass bands). Other masters such as: Dr. Franck Lassegue, Justin Elie, Michel Mauleart Monton, Robert and Nicholas Gefrard, Professor Werner A. Jaegerhuber, Ludovic Lamothe etc., used smaller ensembles. Some of them were known in several U.S and European cities, Paris mostly.

    The US occupation 1915-1934 introduced the jazz in the country and in the 50s, Cuban music and the fast Dominican merengue invaded the country by radio. But Haiti's very large reservoir of folklore roots styles such as petro, congo, yanvalou, ibo… made it possible for its Meringue (big bands) to often use jazz arrangement and Cuban genres without sacrificing its basic African and Creole essence. The Super Jazz des Jeunes and orquestre Issa El Saieh were two giant meringue bands of the 50s.

    Haiti was connected to the Latin world with which there was a musical exchange. Martha Jean Claude, one of the greatest Haitian female stars, who fled to Cuba, interpreted some of the beautifulest slow meringues. The country was the rendezvous of many world stars; no wonder why artists such as: Benvenido Granda, Celia Cruz, Daniel Santo, Harris Bellanfonte, the jazz player Sidney Bechet, even Canadian philharmonic orquestra… interpreted Haitian meringues.

    SUPER JAZZ DES JEUNES

    A super meringue big band that penetrated deeply into the Haitian folklore. The great trumpet player, Antal Murat, was the great arranger of the band mostly when it comes to adapting the several inherited African rhythms such as, petro, congo, ibo, raboday etc. No wonder why the band was attached to the national folklorique troupe that remarkably represented Haiti in many international festivals. in Havana, U.S, Columbia, South America, The musicians included the maestro Rene St. Aude, Antal Murat, the very popular lead singer Gerard Dupervil.

    I thought I'd throw this in there for kicks too


    CADENCE RAMPA

    Cadence means the beat of any rhythmic movement, but here, it is also a style of music created by the talented Haitian saxman Webert Sicot in 1961 after he left Neimours Jean Baptist's compas direct band. He called his music cadence rampa just to differentiate it from the compas. In reality, the two music styles were no different except that two congas and two saxophones where often used in cadence in addition to the basic instruments.

    It is very important to know that there was one and only one cadence. From Haiti, it spread to several islands, mostly Martinique, Guadeloupe, Dominica, French Guyana, and St. Lucia. One of the reasons cadence has been so popular in the islands is because Webert Sicot ensemble toured more often and contracted with producers from the French Antilles. Later, his brother Raymond Sicot, who played compas, would tour many times with his band which, sometimes would spend from 6 months to 2 years in Martinique and Guadeloupe where the music and the dance have been adopted since. The compas mini jazz would Later tour Paris and the French Antilles where they would stay for several months. Musical groups such as: Smoke, Les Leopards, Simon Jurad, les Vikings, Kassav (most of its songs), les Aiglons, Tabou #2, Gramax, and most of the Martinican and Guadeloupeans bands of the so-called cadence era where playing compas. The cadencelypso of Exile one was a mix of compas and calypso.

    Haitian Music Styles | AllMusic
    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

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    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    An article about one of our great musicians.

    In 1830, was born a great man Occilius Jeanty, Sr. Mathematics, music composition, and teaching were his strengths. Among his musical works were some overtures chanson creoles, and Haitian meringues. The meringue was a musical genre that is obviously carrying an African influence, a mixture of Petro and Congo, a set of complex rhythms found in the Vodu culture as part of the Ifa corpus.

    Therefore, the meringue possesses its own style expressing the soul of the Haitian people. The musical concept behind the meringue is based on major and minor scales, 5/8 or 2/4 rhythm with an option of been played lento, allegro or prestissimo. The 5/8 principle called also quintelet was taught by Occilius Jeanty, Sr. at L'ecole Centrale de Musique in Port-au-Prince. The Haitian meringue will reach its full development with Occilius Jeanty's son, born in 1860, musical genius by excellence, leaving with us some incredible works such as Les Vautours du 6 Decembre, Un Choeur de Nos Heros, Les Imprecations de Dessalines, La Trompette des Anges, Nos Masques etc...

    Occide Jeanty, Jr's greatest influence was found in the musique du palais (court music), especially in his military marches. Occide Jeanty elevated the musique du palais to such an extent that this music was rated first in the Caribbean and fourth in the American continent. Other Haitian composers left some gigantic works, among those but not limited to are Ludovic Lamothe, Louis Astree, Toureau Lechaud, Solon Verret, Justin Elie, Frantz Casseus and others. Haiti is counting about sixty composers who contributed towards the evolution of the mizik savant ayisyen.

    Jean E. Saint-Eloi | Music of The Haitian Masters, Vol.1 | CD Baby
    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  3. #3
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Probably the most popular Haitian Meringue song.

    Choucoune

    Choucoune" (Haitian Creole: Choukoun) is an 1883 poem by Haitian Oswald Durand. Its words are in Haitian Creole and are the lyrics to the song "Choucoune" which was later rewritten in English as "Yellow Bird," the title based on the words "ti zwazo" (French: petit oiseau; little bird) from the Durand poem.
    Durand's inspiration for the poem was a "marabou" woman named Marie Noel Belizaire who was nicknamed Choucoune; she was running a restaurant in Cap Haitien when her path crossed with Durand's with a resultant romantic liaison. In the poem Choucoune desserts the poet for a Frenchman's favors; reportedly the real Choucoune and Durand parted because of the poet's serial philandering. Marie Noel Belizaire is said to have died in her seventy-first year in 1924 having spent the last portion of her life in her native village of La-Plaine-du-Nord as a beggarwoman who was widely recognized as the subject of Durand's poem.







    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  4. #4
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  5. #5
    LB
    Peace Love n Pretty Tings LB is offline
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    nice read.

    what is a marabou? what ethnic/racial combination is that?
    ~ If you make the mountain any bigger you wont be able to move it later

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    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ladybug View Post
    nice read.

    what is a marabou? what ethnic/racial combination is that?
    To my knowledge its a Haitian showing varying degrees of Taino/Euro traits sort of a mix between the three afro/amerindian/euro. Who knows though, there are so many unnecessary names for these mixes. I remember growing up people calling Yole Derose a marabou. Who knows if she really is though.

    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  7. #7
    Banned MR.BOOMBASTIC's Avatar MR.BOOMBASTIC is offline
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    so grammacks were playin compas? hahaha irie.

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    Qualified Mixologist Maruka is offline
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    nice read Tk

    but your lil kix contradicted it self in the end

    after saying there is only one cadence they still admitted cadence-lypso was a fusion hence still sets it apart but yet still remains Cadence in truth but yah nice kix

    So was there ever a time recently where Haitians and Dominicans formed one band? and just jammed? That looking like it just waiting to happen.
    Last edited by Maruka; 04-30-2011 at 01:48 PM.

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    Qualified Mixologist Maruka is offline
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    marabou huh i heard that word being used before. did not know there must be 3 mixes. But a black and white person could look like that too though or just taino n black for that matter..

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    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bataka View Post
    nice read Tk

    but your lil kix contradicted it self in the end

    after saying there is only one cadence they still admitted cadence-lypso was a fusion hence still sets it apart but yet still remains Cadence in truth but yah nice kix

    So was there ever a time recently where Haitians and Dominicans formed one band? and just jammed? That looking like it just waiting to happen.
    I'm sure there were Merengue bands that consisting of Haitian and Dominicans. None big though.

    Watch this. An interesting exchange between Dominican and Haitian musicians. One minute when Fernandito comes on with the spanish lyrics it sounds like Dominican Merengue then when Felix comes on with Kreyol it suddenly becomes Konpa. Just goes to show you how close Haitian and Dominican music is.

    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  11. #11
    Qualified Mixologist Maruka is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by tikreyol View Post
    I'm sure there were Merengue bands that consisting of Haitian and Dominicans. None big though.

    Watch this. An interesting exchange between Dominican and Haitian musicians. One minute when Fernandito comes on with the spanish lyrics it sounds like Dominican Merengue then when Felix comes on with Kreyol it suddenly becomes Konpa. Just goes to show you how close Haitian and Dominican music is.

    lol that's kool they should do more stuff like this.. I think music would be something that would break down alot of walls between both countries

    If someone could do a musical biography of one supper Band and document how the mix both sides together that would be sick... remember seeing something like this on hulu. some guy was mixing African bands music with Cuban band members i believe.. it was well done.. Someone should just jack that idea and do one for Haiti n Dr.. both good share same and music

  12. #12
    Banned MR.BOOMBASTIC's Avatar MR.BOOMBASTIC is offline
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    so since they soo close as u say, how many dominicans play haitian merengue

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    Banned bobolee is offline
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    when will yuh haitians stop sucking up to us? and no we music is not the same.

    steups u cyan compare trini n jamaican on dis site without gettin schooled but dese dottish fools be tryina connect dominican and haitian
    Last edited by bobolee; 04-30-2011 at 03:37 PM.

  14. #14
    Got Kompa? tikreyol's Avatar tikreyol is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by MR.BOOMBASTIC View Post
    so since they soo close as u say, how many dominicans play haitian merengue
    First why would they be playing Haitian Meringue when they have and developed their own style of it in the east? When I say they are close I mean listen to the music. The similarities in the rhythm and melodies are there.
    Ti sourit, ti sourit se nan pèlen ou rete
    Rat ki rat se nan pèlen ou rete
    Tèt zozo men pa ou, zozo kale men pa ou
    M ap konyen fanm nan jis solèy leve
    Bwa m kale tou wouj
    Kon piman , kon piman, Langyèt madivinèz
    Ou pa bezwen chandèl pou ou klere l

  15. #15
    Qualified Mixologist Maruka is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobolee View Post
    when will yuh haitians stop sucking up to us? and no we music is not the same.

    steups u cyan compare trini n jamaican on dis site without gettin schooled but dese dottish fools be tryina connect dominican and haitian
    U keep creating fake accounts with your coyon DOTISH fake accent

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