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Thread: Ce qui est bon au Haïti ? (What's good in Haiti ?)

  1. #1
    joon-yah
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    Thumbs up Ce qui est bon au Haïti ? (What's good in Haiti ?)

    like you werent expecting one from me ? . . . .

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    MORE TO COME !!

  2. #2
    I breed Ank Panty Droppa's Avatar Panty Droppa is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by joon-yah
    like you werent expecting one from me ? . . . .

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    MORE TO COME !!
    Where the pics? Had us waiting for a while there.

  3. #3
    ***//\\*** femmeayitienne's Avatar femmeayitienne is offline
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    cremas!!!!

    Labadee!!!

    legume!!!!

    rhum:-)

  4. #4
    Unregistered User sk gyal's Avatar sk gyal is offline
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    Je ne sais pas.

  5. #5
    Pebbles362436
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    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by joon-yah
    like you werent expecting one from me ? . . . .

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    MORE TO COME !!
    Cool you can teach some of us how to speak Hatian creole as well.
    Last edited by Pebbles362436; 04-18-2005 at 11:20 AM.

  6. #6
    joon-yah
    Guest

    I'll start with a time line . . .

    December 5, 1492: Columbus discovers Haiti (the island of Hispaniola)

    1697: The Spaniards cede the western third of Hispaniola to the French crown at the Treaty of Ryswick. Haiti is now called "Saint Domingue".

    1697-1791: Saint Domingue becomes the richest colony in the world. Its capital, Cap Français, is known as the Paris of the New World. It is also a regime of extraordinary cruelty; the 500,000 slaves taken by the French are flogged, starved, and buried alive for minor offenses.

    August 1791: the first major black rebellion takes place, initiated by Boukman, a voodoo houngan. This begins the markings of civil war between the black dominated north and the mulatto dominated south.

    1796: Toussaint L'Ouverture, an educated herb doctor and military man, emerges as the leader of the former slaves in the north. He restored order, ended the massacres, and restored some of Saint Domingue's former prosperity.

    1801: Napoleon Bonaparte despatches an army of 34,000 to tru to subdue the slave armies and retake the colony for France; this mission was unsuccessful. The leader of the army Leclerc ultimately had Toussaint L'Ouverture seized and deported to France. He died within a year.

    May 1802: Convention in Paris reintroduces slavery, which brings on more rebellions and massacres.

    January 1804: Jean Jacques Dessalines proclaimed the independent black Republic of Haiti in the northern half of the island. Dessalines was unpopular with the mulattos and was assassinated in 1806. His death led to civil war again between the south (under General Petion) and the north (under Henry Christophe).

    1820: Henry Christophe commits suicide by shooting himself with a silver bullet; he had been a tyrannical ruler, crowning himself "king", and building a palace and citadel (at Cap Haitien in the north) at great cost to Haitian lives. At his death Haiti was taken over by General Boyer, and civil war ceased. Boyer obtained official Haitian independence from France at the price of 150 million French francs.

    1843 to 1915: Haiti sees 22 heads of state, most of whom leave office by violent means. Rivalry continues among the whites, the mulatto elite, and the blacks.

    1915: Presdient Guillaume Sam is dismembered and the Americans invade the country. They remain for 19 years. Despite improvements made to the infrastructure by the Americans, the Haitians opposed their presence.

    1934: The Americans leave Haiti, which is now prospering once again.

    1957: François Duvalier, a doctor and union leader, was elected president. Duvalier, also known as 'Papa Doc', terrorized the country, rooting out any and all opponents to his administration. He was a practicing vodunist, his loa being Baron Samedi, the guardian of cemeteries and a harbinger of death. He ensured his power through his private militia, the tontons macoutes (which means in kreyol, "uncle boogeyman").

    1964: Duvalier changes the constitution so that he can be elected president for life.

    1971: François Duvalier dies and is succeeded by his son Jean Claude, age 19 (also known as 'Baby Doc'). By this time Haiti is the poorest country in the western hemisphere (and remains so to this day).

    February 1986: The Duvalier regime collapses under Operation Deschoukay and Baby Doc flees to France.

    December 1990: Jean-Bertrand Aristide (a religious priest) is elected in a landslide victory.

    Military coup deposes Aristide's government; Organization of American states imposes an embargo lasting three years.

    1994: Aristide returns to Haiti to serve out his term of office, facilitated by the US military and UN troops.

    December, 1995: René Préval elected in a landslide victory

    1998: elected government, President René Préval (currently no Prime Minister)


    and umm . . . currently there are UN troops placed in Haiti due to the controversial removal of former President Aristide. Currently Prime Minister Latortue is in "power".

  7. #7
    joon-yah
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    the most important figure head of Haiti history . . .

    Francois Dominique Toussaint Louverture

    Last edited by joon-yah; 04-18-2005 at 10:46 PM.

  8. #8
    joon-yah
    Guest

    L'Ouverture's biography . . .

    Francois Dominique Toussaint L'Ouverture 1744–1803, Haitian patriot and martyr. A self-educated slave freed shortly before the uprising in 1791, he joined the black rebellion to liberate the slaves and became its organizational genius. Rapidly rising in power, Toussaint joined forces for a brief period in 1793 with the Spanish of Santo Domingo and in a series of fast-moving campaigns became known as L'Ouverture [the opening], a name he adopted. Although he professed allegiance to France, first to the republic and then to Napoleon, he was singleheartedly devoted to the cause of his own people and advocated it in his talks with French commissioners. Late in 1793 the British occupied all of Haiti's coastal cities and allied themselves with the Spanish in the eastern part of the island. Toussaint was the acknowledged leader against them and, with the generals Dessalines and Christophe, recaptured (1798) several towns from the British and secured their complete withdrawal. In 1799 the mulatto general AndrE Rigaud enlisted the aid of Alexandre PEtion and Jean Pierre Boyer, asserted mulatto supremacy, and launched a revolt against Toussaint; the uprising was quelled when PEtion lost the southern port of Jacmel. In 1801, Toussaint conquered Santo Domingo, which had been ceded by Spain to France in 1795, and thus he governed the whole island. By then professing only nominal allegiance to France, he reorganized the government and instituted public improvements. Napoleon sent (1802) a large force under General Leclerc to subdue Toussaint, who had become a major obstacle to French colonial ambitions in the Western Hemisphere; the Haitians, however, offered stubborn resistance, and a peace treaty was drawn. Toussaint himself was treacherously seized and sent to France, where he died in a dungeon at Fort-de-Joux, in the French Jura. His valiant life and tragic death made him a symbol of the fight for liberty, and he is celebrated in one of Wordsworth's finest sonnets and in a dramatic poem by Lamartine.

  9. #9
    Island Soul's PD zenzele1's Avatar zenzele1 is offline
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    Labadee

  10. #10
    Island Soul's PD zenzele1's Avatar zenzele1 is offline
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  11. #11
    Blessed ILanDFnTsY's Avatar ILanDFnTsY is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by zenzele1
    More
    The pics are pretty...I always find it so sad that Haiti has so much tragedy...

  12. #12
    Island Soul's PD zenzele1's Avatar zenzele1 is offline
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    Cap Haitien
    Port Au Prince
    Jacmel
    Add some more folks:

  13. #13
    Island Soul's PD zenzele1's Avatar zenzele1 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by ILanDFnTsY
    The pics are pretty...I always find it so sad that Haiti has so much tragedy...
    It is extremely sad. The first Black republic in the Western hemisphere with such tragedy.

  14. #14
    joon-yah
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    Creole

    Haitian Creole

    The Sound System (Phonology)

    It is difficult to give a standard description of the Haitian Creole phonological system; linguists do not agree on a phonological analysis of Haitian Creole, probably because there is so much regional variation in pronunciation. As a rule, the pronunciation of monolingual Creole speakers is taken as a standard. There is variation between North and South, however, and Port-au-Prince pronunciation (especially of vowels) tends to be more like French, since most of the bilingual Haitian Creole–French speakers live there.

    Since English has also borrowed many words from French, the sound systems of Haitian Creole and English share many similarities. Therefore, Haitians learning English should not have overwhelming problems with the pronunciation of individual words. Basically, Haitian Creole only lacks the /th/ sounds in "thick" and "the," the /i/ sound in "pin," the /a/ sound in "hat," and the /r/ sound in "row." It contains, however, other sounds (e.g., nasals) that do not exist in English.

  15. #15
    joon-yah
    Guest

    Labadee, Haiti . . .

    is known for its tourism




    the Royal Caribbean Cruise ship stops in it's ports




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