Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Jamaica's True Queen: Nanny of the Maroons

  1. #1
    Dawtah of the Sun Empressdududahlin's Avatar Empressdududahlin is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    in a sacred space...
    Posts
    27,131
    Credits
    545,950

    Jamaica's True Queen: Nanny of the Maroons

    After having a great conversation with a sista about Nanny of the Maroons in Jamaica... she sent me this link and I want people to see the reference of her African spiritual background in the second section of this thread... once you're done reading this and you don't know about Queen Nanny please read up about her in history HERE:


    Background

    Queen Nanny of the Windward Maroons has largely been ignored by historians who have restricted their focus to male figures in Maroon history. However, amongst the Maroons themselves she is held in the highest esteem. Biographical information on Queen Nanny is somewhat vague, with her being mentioned only four times in written historical texts and usually in somewhat derogatory terms. However, she is held up as the most important figure in Maroon history. She was the spiritual, cultural and military leader of the Windward Maroons and her importance stems from the fact that she guided the Maroons through the most intense period of their resistance against the British, between 1725 and 1740.

    Queen Nanny is presumed to have been born around the 1680’s in Africa’s Gold Coast (now known as Ghana). She was reported to belong to either the Ashanti or Akan tribe and came to Jamaica as a free woman. It is possible that Queen Nanny brought slaves of her own, reportedly being of royal African blood. It was not uncommon for African dignitaries to keep slaves. She was said to be married to a man named Adou, but had no children. She died in the 1730’s.

    Moore Town is now the primary town of the Windward Maroons – it was founded in 1734 after the British destroyed the original Maroon town, which was known as ‘Nanny Town’.




    Historical Maroon Identity and Culture
    Slaves imported to Jamaica from Africa came from the Gold Coast, the Congo and Madagascar. The dominant group among Maroon communities was from the Gold Coast. In Jamaica this group was referred to as Coromantie or Koromantee. They were fierce and ferocious fighters with a preference for resistance, survival and above all freedom and refused to become slaves. Between 1655 until the 1830’s they led most of the slave rebellions in Jamaica.

    Spiritual life was of the utmost importance to the Maroons which was incorporated into every aspect of life, from child rearing to military strategies. Almost every slave rebellion involved African spiritual practices. Leaders, such as Queen Nanny usually practiced Obeah and were able to instill confidence in their followers. Spiritual practices such as Obeah (and voodoo in Haiti) evolved from Africa, and during slavery times were of great significance to the black population. However, under colonial rule as Western culture was imposed on the Caribbean, these African practices became ‘outlawed’ and took on negative connotations.
    Among Maroon culture, their ancestors are revered and their importance to everyday life is recognized. The past is a source of pride which is both taught and shared. Amongst modern day Maroons, the history of their resistance against slavery is an extreme form of pride that forms a large part of Maroon identity. The story of the Maroons endurance and ability to hold off the British troops for almost eighty years is one that has never been repeated in history. What saw the Maroons through to freedom were their unfailing courage and determination. Their resistance to slavery drew on the strength of their memory of Africa and its culture. Their African culture and identity instilled in them great confidence and self esteem. So much so, that this diluted the stigma of inferiority imposed by the plantocracy. Therefore, the resistance against slavery by the Maroons was a defense of their culture and identity, their spiritual and political values and preservation of African civilization. This is why Maroon ancestors are an integral part of their day to day lives. At each annual Maroon celebration of the 1739 Peace Treaties there is a ‘private’ element of the festivities at which only Maroons may attend, where the ancestors are said to visit, including Queen Nanny who is honored.

  2. #2
    Chemical-Oxide & Bangaray islandcocoa's Avatar islandcocoa is offline
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Mysterious Babylon
    Posts
    848
    Credits
    320
    I LOVE HERRRRRRRRRRRRRRR

  3. #3
    RasYardHindian Simon S's Avatar Simon S is offline
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    D BLOCK
    Posts
    5,569
    Credits
    52,717
    Gimme me African Princess..
    mi have fi luv them up excess...


    Imagine if every woman was a "Nanny"?

    Last week when I was reading about Yoruba's I did see a connection with the Obeah and the traditions.
    But now you throw Nanny into my equation ....good.

    My friend who sent me the links I posted was laughing at my discovery - my "ahh" moment because I am from Obeah central, Jamaica and didn't recognize it sooner. Now I'm beating myself for not visiting a Maroon village in Jamaica, like Moore Town or Accompong..I will when I go back.

  4. #4
    Chemical-Oxide & Bangaray islandcocoa's Avatar islandcocoa is offline
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Mysterious Babylon
    Posts
    848
    Credits
    320
    Quote Originally Posted by Simple Simon
    Gimme me African Princess..
    mi have fi luv them up excess...


    Imagine if every woman was a "Nanny"?

    Last week when I was reading about Yoruba's I did see a connection with the Obeah and the traditions.
    But now you throw Nanny into my equation ....good.

    My friend who sent me the links I posted was laughing at my discovery - my "ahh" moment because I am from Obeah central, Jamaica and didn't recognize it sooner. Now I'm beating myself for not visiting a Maroon village in Jamaica, like Moore Town or Accompong..I will when I go back.
    Awww Simon...here take an e-hug...i am really glad that you took the liberty to go read upon the Yoruba and now you see why i had asked you about the pocomania, i was hoping you would see the link and the evidence of it in Jamaica....

  5. #5
    Dawtah of the Sun Empressdududahlin's Avatar Empressdududahlin is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    in a sacred space...
    Posts
    27,131
    Credits
    545,950
    Quote Originally Posted by Simple Simon
    Gimme me African Princess..
    mi have fi luv them up excess...


    Imagine if every woman was a "Nanny"?

    Last week when I was reading about Yoruba's I did see a connection with the Obeah and the traditions.
    But now you throw Nanny into my equation ....good.

    My friend who sent me the links I posted was laughing at my discovery - my "ahh" moment because I am from Obeah central, Jamaica and didn't recognize it sooner. Now I'm beating myself for not visiting a Maroon village in Jamaica, like Moore Town or Accompong..I will when I go back.
    Wouldn't it be such a powerful world.

    Man you need to check out some other traditions in the Caribbean as well and see the connection ie. check out my threads about the Garifuna culture in Belize.

  6. #6
    Registered User BacchanalDiva's Avatar BacchanalDiva is offline
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    In Oshun's embrace
    Posts
    15,815
    Credits
    6,935,802
    Quote Originally Posted by HoneyEmpress
    After having a great conversation with a sista about Nanny of the Maroons in Jamaica... she sent me this link and I want people to see the reference of her African spiritual background in the second section of this thread... once you're done reading this and you don't know about Queen Nanny please read up about her in history HERE:


    Background

    Queen Nanny of the Windward Maroons has largely been ignored by historians who have restricted their focus to male figures in Maroon history. However, amongst the Maroons themselves she is held in the highest esteem. Biographical information on Queen Nanny is somewhat vague, with her being mentioned only four times in written historical texts and usually in somewhat derogatory terms. However, she is held up as the most important figure in Maroon history. She was the spiritual, cultural and military leader of the Windward Maroons and her importance stems from the fact that she guided the Maroons through the most intense period of their resistance against the British, between 1725 and 1740.

    Queen Nanny is presumed to have been born around the 1680’s in Africa’s Gold Coast (now known as Ghana). She was reported to belong to either the Ashanti or Akan tribe and came to Jamaica as a free woman. It is possible that Queen Nanny brought slaves of her own, reportedly being of royal African blood. It was not uncommon for African dignitaries to keep slaves. She was said to be married to a man named Adou, but had no children. She died in the 1730’s.

    Moore Town is now the primary town of the Windward Maroons – it was founded in 1734 after the British destroyed the original Maroon town, which was known as ‘Nanny Town’.




    Historical Maroon Identity and Culture
    Slaves imported to Jamaica from Africa came from the Gold Coast, the Congo and Madagascar. The dominant group among Maroon communities was from the Gold Coast. In Jamaica this group was referred to as Coromantie or Koromantee. They were fierce and ferocious fighters with a preference for resistance, survival and above all freedom and refused to become slaves. Between 1655 until the 1830’s they led most of the slave rebellions in Jamaica.

    Spiritual life was of the utmost importance to the Maroons which was incorporated into every aspect of life, from child rearing to military strategies. Almost every slave rebellion involved African spiritual practices. Leaders, such as Queen Nanny usually practiced Obeah and were able to instill confidence in their followers. Spiritual practices such as Obeah (and voodoo in Haiti) evolved from Africa, and during slavery times were of great significance to the black population. However, under colonial rule as Western culture was imposed on the Caribbean, these African practices became ‘outlawed’ and took on negative connotations.
    Among Maroon culture, their ancestors are revered and their importance to everyday life is recognized. The past is a source of pride which is both taught and shared. Amongst modern day Maroons, the history of their resistance against slavery is an extreme form of pride that forms a large part of Maroon identity. The story of the Maroons endurance and ability to hold off the British troops for almost eighty years is one that has never been repeated in history. What saw the Maroons through to freedom were their unfailing courage and determination. Their resistance to slavery drew on the strength of their memory of Africa and its culture. Their African culture and identity instilled in them great confidence and self esteem. So much so, that this diluted the stigma of inferiority imposed by the plantocracy. Therefore, the resistance against slavery by the Maroons was a defense of their culture and identity, their spiritual and political values and preservation of African civilization. This is why Maroon ancestors are an integral part of their day to day lives. At each annual Maroon celebration of the 1739 Peace Treaties there is a ‘private’ element of the festivities at which only Maroons may attend, where the ancestors are said to visit, including Queen Nanny who is honored.
    Thanks Honey, GREAT article. I had never heard of Nanny but reading about her just reinforced my thoughts on a few things. Its all coming together slowly but surely :-)
    "Those who are able to see beyond the shadows and lies of their culture will never be understood, let alone believed, by the masses." -Plato

    "god is the deification of a culture."
    -Dr Yosef ben-Jochannan

  7. #7
    .
    L O S T .'s Avatar . is offline
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    .|.
    Posts
    38,035
    Credits
    578,961
    nice post
    coming from someone with MAROON BLOOD !

  8. #8
    Baby Luv Sencia's Avatar Sencia is offline
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Zion
    Posts
    10,948
    Credits
    512,107
    hmmm nice article empy. my ex's family is from the hills of st Catherine and they were always talking about the Maroons and Nanny and incorporating it into the reason behind the agressive nature of many jamaicans.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •