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Thread: Caribbean Medalists in the Olympic Games

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    Thumbs up Caribbean Medalists in the Olympic Games

    TriniTrini you got your thread wish

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    Usain Bolt



    Usain Bolt IPA: [ju'seːn] (born 21 August 1986) is a Jamaican sprinter and holds the Olympic and world records for the 100 metres at 9.69 seconds, the 200 metres at 19.30 seconds and, along with his teammates, the 4x100 metres relay at 37.10 seconds. At the 2008 Summer Olympics, Bolt became the first man to win all three events at a single Olympics since Carl Lewis in 1984, and the first man in history to set world records in all three at a single Olympics. His name and achievements in sprinting have earned him the media nickname, "Lightning Bolt".[3]

    Bolt also distinguished himself prior to the 2008 Olympics with a 200 m gold medal at the 2002 World Junior Championships making him the youngest gold medallist in the history of the competition. At the 2004 World Junior Championships, Bolt became the first junior sprinter to run the 200 m in under 20 seconds with a time of 19.93 s, breaking Roy Martin's world junior record by two tenths of a second. Bolt also set competition records at a number of other junior events.

    Bolt turned professional in 2004 but missed most of his first two seasons due to injuries; he was eliminated in the first round of the 200 m heats at the 2004 Summer Olympics. In 2007, Bolt beat Don Quarrie's 200 m Jamaican national record with a run of 19.75 s and on the 31st May 2008, set his first 100 m world record with 9.72 s, improving upon his personal best of 9.76 s made earlier in the month.[4]



    Early life
    Bolt was born in Trelawny, Jamaica, on 21 August 1986.[2][3] As a child, he was successful in the annual, national primary schools' meeting for his parish,[3] and enjoyed playing cricket, specialising in fast bowling. Upon his entry to William Knibb Memorial High School, his cricket coach noticed Bolt's speed on the pitch and urged him to try track and field events.[4] Pablo McNeil and Dwayne Barrett coached Bolt, encouraging him to focus his energy on improving his athletic abilities. The school had a history of athletic success with past students including Michael Green.[3] Bolt won his first annual high school championships medal in 2001, taking the silver medal in the 200metres with a time of 22.04seconds.[3]
    Performing in his first Caribbean national event, Bolt clocked a personal best of 48.28seconds in the 400metres in the 2001 CARIFTA Games, winning a silver medal.[5] The 200metres also yielded a silver as Bolt finished in 21.81seconds. He made his first appearance on the world stage at the 2001 IAAF World Youth Championships in Debrecen, Hungary. Running in the 200metres event, he failed to qualify for the finals, but he still set a new personal best of 21.73seconds.[6] In 2002, Bolt won both the 200 and 400metres events in the High School Championships, CARIFTA Games, and Central American and Caribbean Junior Championships.[3] He set championship records for both 200 and 400metres in the 2002 CARIFTA games with 21.12seconds and 47.33seconds respectively.[5] He continued to set records, with 20.61seconds and 47.12seconds finishes at the CAC Junior Championships.[7]
    Rise to prominence
    The 2002 World Junior Championships in front of a home crowd in Kingston, Jamaica, offered Bolt a chance to showcase his talent on the world stage. By the age of 15, he had grown to 1.96metres (6ft5in) tall, and he physically stood out amongst his peers He won the 200metres, in a time of 20.61seconds, a new personal best.As a member of the Jamaican sprint relay team, Bolt took two silver medals and set national junior records in the 4x100metres and 4x400metres with 39.15seconds and 3:04.06minutes, respectively.[Bolt's 200metres win made him the youngest world-junior gold medallist ever. The flow of medals continued as he won another gold at the 2003 World Youth Championships. He set a new championship record in the 200metres with 20.40seconds, despite a 1.1m/s head wind.
    Bolt turned his main focus to the 200metres and equalled Roy Martin's world junior record of 20.13seconds at the Pan-American Junior Championships.[3] In his final Jamaican High School Championships in 2003, he finished the 200metres in 20.25seconds, beating the previous record by a margin of 0.57seconds. In the 400metres, he crossed the line in 45.30seconds to beat the old record of 46.17seconds. As the reigning 200metres champion at both the World Youth and World Junior championships, Bolt hoped to take a clean sweep of the world 200metres championships in the Senior World Championships in Paris. However, he was not able to compete because of a bout of conjunctivitis before the event. This ruined his training schedule, causing him to withdraw.[3]

    Professional athletics career
    Under the guidance of new coach Fitz Coleman, Bolt turned professional in 2004, beginning with the CARIFTA games in Bermuda.[3] He became the first junior sprinter to run the 200 metres in under 20 seconds, breaking Roy Martin's world junior record by two tenths of a second with 19.93 seconds.[3][12] Bolt headed to the 2004 Athens Olympics with confidence and a new record on his side. However, he was hampered by a leg injury and was eliminated in the first round of the 200 metres with a disappointing 21.05 seconds.[15][1] American colleges offered Bolt track scholarships on the strength of his performances, but the teenager from Trelawny refused them all, stating that he was content to stay in his homeland of Jamaica.[16] Bolt instead chose the surroundings of the University of Technology, Jamaica, as his training ground, busying himself with the university's primitive track and weight room.[17]



    Bolt preparing to race at the 2007 Osaka World ChampionshipsThe following year, 2005, signalled a fresh start for Bolt in the form of a new coach, Glen Mills, and a new attitude to athletics. Mills recognised Bolt's potential and aimed to cease the sprinter's unprofessional approach to the sport.[15] The year began well as he registered his 200 metres season's best at London's Crystal Palace in July, running 19.99 seconds.[1] Misfortune awaited Bolt at the next major event: the 2005 World Championships in Helsinki. Bolt qualified with runs under 21 seconds but he suffered an injury in the final, finishing last with a time of 26.27 seconds.[15][18] Eighteen-year-old Bolt still had not proved his mettle in the major world athletics competitions. Bolt soon recovered and continued to improve, reaching the world top 5 rankings in 2005 and 2006.[3] He ran 19.88 seconds, a new personal best, at the 2006 Grand Prix in Lausanne, Switzerland, finishing behind Xavier Carter and Tyson Gay to earn a bronze medal.[19]

    Bolt claimed his first major world medal two months later at the IAAF World Athletics Final in Stuttgart, Germany. He passed the finishing post with a time of 20.10 seconds, gaining a bronze medal in the process.[1] The IAAF World Cup in Athens, Greece, yielded Bolt's first senior international silver medal.[1] Wallace Spearmon from the United States won gold with a championship record of 19.87 seconds, beating Bolt's respectable time of 19.96 seconds.[20] Further 200 metres honours on both the regional and international scale awaited Bolt in 2007. The young Jamaican yearned to run in the 100 metres, but coach Mills diverted his attention, stating that he could run the shorter distance if he broke the 200 metres national record.[15] In the Jamaican Championships, he ran 19.75 seconds in the 200 metres, breaking the 36-year-old Jamaican record held by Don Quarrie by 0.11 seconds.[16][3]

    Mills complied with Bolt's demand to run in the 100 metres, and he was entered to run the event at the 23rd Vardinoyiannia meeting in Rethymno, Crete. In his debut run, he set a career best of 10.03 seconds, winning the gold medal and feeding his enthusiasm for the event.[21][16] He built on this achievement at the World Championships in Osaka, Japan, winning a silver medal.[1] Bolt recorded 19.91 seconds with a headwind of 0.8 m/s but this paled in comparison to Tyson Gay's 19.76 seconds which set a new championship record.[22] The Jamaican national record fell when Bolt partnered with Asafa Powell, Marvin Anderson, and Nesta Carter in the 4x100 metres relay. However, their finish in 37.89 seconds was not enough to beat the Americans' time of 37.78 seconds.[23] No gold medals were gleaned at the major tournaments in 2007, but Mills felt that Bolt's technique was much improved, pinpointing improvements in Bolt's balance at the turns over 200 metres and an increase in his stride frequency, giving him more driving power on the track.[15]

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    Usain Bolt

    World record breaker
    The silver medals from the 2007 Osaka World Championships boosted Bolt's desire to run and he took a more serious, more mature stance towards his career.Bolt continued to develop in the 100 metres, and he entered to run in the event at the Jamaica Invitational in Kingston. On 3 May 2008, Bolt ran 9.76 seconds, aided by a tail wind of 1.8 m/s. This was the second-fastest legal performance in the history of the event; second only to compatriot Asafa Powell's 9.74 seconds record set the previous year in Rieti, Italy. Rival Tyson Gay lauded the performance, praising Bolt's form and technique especially. The Jamaican surprised even himself with the time, but coach Glen Mills remained confident that there was more to come.

    Mills' prediction came true before the end of the month when Bolt established a new 100 metres world record on 31 May 2008. Pushed on by a tail wind of1.7 m/s, Bolt ran 9.72 seconds at the Reebok Grand Prix held in the Icahn Stadium in New York City, breaking Powell's record. The record time was even more remarkable in light of the fact that it was only his fifth senior run over the distance. Gay again finished second and commended Bolt's physical superiority, stating; "it looked like his knees were going past my face". Commentators noted that Bolt appeared to have gained a psychological advantage over fellow Olympic contender Gay. Turning his efforts to the 200 metres, Bolt proved that he could excel in multiple events, breaking the national record again with a 19.67 seconds finish in Athens, Greece. His confidence was building and he was sure that he would perform well in the upcoming Olympics.


    2008 Summer Olympics

    Bolt announced that he would double-up with the 100 metres and 200 metres events at the Beijing Summer Olympics, and the new 100 metres world-record holder was the favourite to win both. Michael Johnson, the 200 metres and 400 metres record holder, personally backed the sprinter, saying he did not believe that a lack of experience would work against him.[ Bolt qualified for the final with 9.92 and 9.85 seconds in the quarter-finals and semifinals respectively. In the Olympic 100 metres final, Bolt broke new ground, winning in 9.69 seconds. This was an improvement upon his own world record, and he was well ahead of second-place finisher Richard Thompson, who finished in 9.89 seconds. Not only was the record set without a favourable wind (+0.0 m/s), but also he visibly slowed down to celebrate before he finished and his shoelace was untied. Bolt continued running past the post, enjoying his victory. Bolt stated that setting a record was not a priority for him, and that his goal was just to win the gold medal, Jamaica's first of the 2008 Games. Olympic medallist Kriss Akabusi construed Bolt's chest slapping before the finish line as showboating, noting that the actions cost Bolt an even faster record time. IOC president Jacques Rogge also condemned the Jamaican's actions as disrespectful. Bolt denied that this was the purpose of his mid-race celebration by saying "I wasn't bragging. When I saw I wasn't covered, I was just happy."


    Bolt then focused on attaining a gold medal in the 200 metres event, aiming to emulate Carl Lewis' double win in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. Michael Johnson felt that Bolt would easily win gold but believed his world record of 19.32 seconds set at the 1996 Summer Olympics in Atlanta would remain intact at the Olympics. Bolt eased through the first and second rounds of the 200 metres, jogging towards the end of his run both times. He won his semifinal and progressed to the last 8 as the favourite to win. The following day, at the final, he won Jamaica's fourth gold of the Games, setting a new world and Olympic record of 19.30 seconds. Johnson's record fell despite the fact Bolt was impeded by a 0.9 m/s headwind. The feat made him the first sprinter since Don Quarrie to hold both 100 and 200 metres world records simultaneously and the first since the introduction of electronic timing. Furthermore, Bolt became the first sprinter to break both records at the same Olympics. Unlike the 100 metres race, Bolt pressed all the way to the finish line, even dipping his chest to improve his time. Following the race, "Happy Birthday" was played over the stadium's sound system as his 22nd birthday began at midnight.



    Two days later, Bolt ran as the third leg in the Jamaican 4x100 metres relay team, taking his gold medal total to three.With the help of Nesta Carter, Michael Frater and Asafa Powell, Bolt broke yet another world and Olympic record as their 37.10 seconds finish broke the previous record by three tenths of a second. Powell, who anchored the team to the finishing line, lamented the loss of his 100 metres record to Bolt but showed no animosity towards his Jamaican rival, stating he was delighted to help him set his third world record.[55]


    Personal life
    Bolt grew up in Trelawny, Jamaica, with his parents, Jennifer and Wellesley Bolt, and his sister Sherine. Bolt expresses a love for dancing and his character is frequently described as laid-back and relaxed. The first sport to interest him was cricket and he said if he was not a sprinter he would be a fast bowler instead. Bolt's Jamaican track and field idols include Herb McKenley and, former Jamaican 200 metres record holder, Don Quarrie. Michael Johnson, the former 200 metres world and Olympic record holder, is also held in high esteem by Bolt.

    After winning the 200 metres title in the 2002 World Junior Championships in Kingston, Jamaica, Bolt signed a sponsorship deal with Puma. To promote Bolt's chase for Olympic glory in the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China, Puma released a series of videos including Bolt's then-world-record-setting run in Icahn Stadium and his Olympic preparations. After his world record breaking run in New York City, which was preceded by a lightning storm, the press frequently made puns on the Jamaican's name, nicknaming him "Lightning Bolt" and the "Bolt from the blue". During the Beijing 2008 100 metres final, Bolt wore golden Puma spikes that had "Beijing 100 m Gold" emblazoned across them.

    Bolt is also a cricket lover, and a fan of Sachin Tendulkar, Chris Gayle, Matthew Hayden, and Adam Gilchrist.[66]


    Medal Record

    Olympic Games
    Gold 2008 Beijing 100metres
    Gold 2008 Beijing 200metres
    Gold 2008 Beijing 4 × 100m relay

    World Championships
    Silver 2007 Osaka 200m
    Silver 2007 Osaka 4 × 100m relay

    World Junior Championships
    Gold 2002 Kingston 200m
    Silver 2002 Kingston 4 × 100m relay
    Silver 2002 Kingston 4 × 400m relay

    World Youth Championships
    Gold 2003 Sherbrooke 200m

    Last edited by LGN; 08-23-2008 at 05:51 AM.

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    Usain Bolt

    'Is the Trelawny yam stand up in him ... '
    published: Sunday | August 17, 2008


    Photo by Noel Thompson
    "Gwaan Usain, gwaan!" This was one of the cheers echoed across the tiny living room of Lillian Bolt (first right), Usain Bolt's aunt, as he throttled down to the finishing line at the 29th Olympiad in Beijing, China, yesterday, winning gold in the Men's 100 Metres - the first time ever for Jamaica in Olympic history. Sharing in the celebrations from left are Christine Bolt, Usain's eldest sister, and his father Wellesley (face partially hidden). Aunt Lillian's house was where some persons went to watch the race on television.

    Noel Thompson, Sunday Gleaner Writer


    THE DEAFENING sounds of celebrations reverberated across Trelawny when favourite son, 21-year-old Usain Bolt created history at the 29th Olympics in Beijing, China.

    The jubilation spread from the rocky and hilly terrain of Sherwood Content to the flat plains of Water Square, Falmouth.

    Bolt clocked a world and Olympic record of 9.69 seconds to win the men's 100 metres yesterday.

    While Bolt reigned at the Bird's Nest stadium in Beijing, China, the celebrations were on in his aunt's living room in Sherwood Content. One could almost touch the excitement inside Lillian Bolt's 10x10 ft living room, shortly after 7 a.m. when Bolt won his semi-final race.

    In that same room, Usain's father, Wellesley, his sister, Christine, a host of relatives, friends and a flurry of media persons crammed to watch the races.

    Tossed and turned all night

    "I was up until 12:30 a.m. I went to bed but I tossed and turned all night," related Wellesley. "Worse, I was alone in the bed. The start is what bothers me, because Asafa is gonna fly out that box, and Usain will have to follow him."

    Added Wellesley: "If the other athletes get out the box, it is gonna be hard, but his top-end speed is very good, so 50 metres into the race he will be chasing them down," Wellesley remarked before the race.

    Usain's Aunt Lillian was obviously nervous, as her feet trembled uncontrollably.

    Wiped a tear

    "Don't let us down boy, don't let us down," she said softly, as she wiped a trickle of tears from her eyes. As Bolt cruised into the finishing line in the semi-finals, she was more courageous. "He is just jogging the race. I am confident he's gonna win the 100 metres," she said.

    And win he did!

    At approximately 9:32 a.m. yesterday when Bolt literally throttled down to take the gold, the tiny room was enveloped in sheer joy and excitement, emotions climaxing. It was obvious that persons were fighting hard to hold back tears of joy as the reality of Bolt's feat was cemented.

    Bolt's father was overwhelmed with emotions. He rubbed his eyes as he fought hard to prevent the tears.

    "Is the Trelawny yam stand up in him, yes, di yam," remarked an elated Wellesley. "Once he gets going, I know they were not gonna catch him. He is such a strong young man.

    "I know he will take more gold," the elder Bolt added. He said he was planning a massive welcome for Usain in September.

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    Richard Thompson



    Richard Thompson
    POSITION: Sprints
    HEIGHT: 6-2
    CLASS: Junior
    EXPERIENCE: 2L
    HIGH SCHOOL: Queen's Royal HS
    HOMETOWN: Cascade,####Trinidad

    Events: 60M (6.51), 100M (9.93), 200M (20.18)
    4-time NCAA Champion
    8-time All-American
    4-time NCAA Mideast Regional Champion
    5-time SEC Champion
    8-time All-SEC
    2008 Olympian (100 meters)
    2008 NCAA Men’s Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year
    2008 SEC Male Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year
    2008 USTFCCCA South Central Region Male Track Athlete of the Year

    Olympic Games

    Silver 2008 Beijing 100 m
    Silver 2008 Beijing 4 × 100 m relay
    NCAA Championships

    Gold 2008 NCAA Championships 100m

    NCAA Indoor Championships
    Gold 2008 NCAA Indoor Championships




    CAREER CAPSULE
    Richard Thompson will go down as arguably the greatest sprinter to ever wear the LSU uniform after dominating the sport of collegiate track and field during his senior season in 2008. He became the first Tiger in history to sweep NCAA sprint titles in both the 60-meter and 100-meter dashes in 2008 and was the first collegiate athlete to accomplish the remarkable feat since Tennessee star Justin Gatlin in 2002. In addition, Thompson ran on a pair of NCAA champion 4x100-meter relay teams as a sophomore in 2006 and as a senior in 2008, while racking up a total of eight All-America honors during his collegiate career to tie for sixth in school history. No one has run faster than Thompson in the history of LSU track and field as he finished his career as the school-record holder in both the 60 meters (6.51) and 100 meters (9.93) after establishing both career best marks in his final season in Baton Rouge. Thompson not only dominated NCAA competition as a senior, but he also proved to be the class of the Southeastern Conference by sweeping 100-meter and 200-meter titles at the 2008 SEC Outdoor Championships, becoming the first LSU athlete to accomplish that feat since Byron Logan in 1998. He was a five-time SEC champion and eight-time All-SEC performer in his four seasons with the Tigers. Thompson’s best time of 20.18 in the 200 meters ranks third in the history of the LSU program. While the NCAA team title eluded Thompson during his collegiate career, he did help lead LSU to a total of four runner-up finishes at the NCAA Championships.

    2008
    Wrapped up a brilliant four-year career at LSU as the premier sprinter in the NCAA in 2008 ... Was named the NCAA Men’s Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year by the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association for his dominance on the track ... Also named the SEC Male Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year for the first time in his career in a vote of the league’s head coaches ... Became the first LSU athlete to sweep NCAA titles in the 60 meters and 100 meters in the same season and the first collegiate athlete to accomplish the feat since Tennessee’s Justin Gatlin in 2002 ... Set a meet record and new school record of 6.51 seconds to win the 60-meter title at the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships in Fayetteville, Ark. ... Won the 100-meter title at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in Des Moines, Iowa, with a time of 10.12 in the final ... Became the first Tiger in program history to be crowned NCAA champion in the 60 meters, while he joined LSU great Xavier Carter as only the second NCAA champion in the 100 meters in the storied history of LSU track and field ... Won a third NCAA title during his senior season by running the second leg on the Tigers’ NCAA champion 4x100-meter relay team ... Teamed with Armanti Hayes, Gabriel Mvumvure and Trindon Holliday to clock the third-fastest time in school history and the sixth-fastest time in the history of collegiate track and field at 38.42 in the NCAA final ... Added a fourth All-America honor during the 2008 season as he was the NCAA runner-up in the 200 meters after clocking a 20.44 in the national final during the outdoor season ... On the strength of his performance, the Tigers earned a fourth-place finish at the NCAA Indoor Championships and a runner-up finish at the NCAA Outdoor Championships for the third straight season ... Finished his senior season unbeaten in both the 60 meters and 100 meters ... Was a perfect 4-0 in 60-meter finals on the year, including a win at the SEC Indoor Championships with a time of 6.59 in the final... Also won 60-meter titles at the Razorback Invitational (6.62) and New Balance Collegiate Invitational (6.57) ... Carried that momentum into the outdoor season as he was a perfect 4-0 in 100-meter finals ... Set the 100-meter school record at the SEC Outdoor Championships with a winning time of 9.93 in the conference final ... His career best time in the 100-meter dash is also the third-fastest time in the history of collegiate track and field behind only the collegiate record of 9.89 set by Clemson’s Travis Padgett in 2008 and the time of 9.92 recorded by UCLA’s Ato Boldon in 1996 ... Also won 100-meter titles at the Texas Relays (10.00) and NCAA Mideast Regional Championships (9.97) ... After winning his first career SEC title in the 100 meters, he clocked a time of 20.23 in the final to sweep sprint titles with a win in the 200 meters ... Became the first LSU athlete to sweep SEC sprint titles during the outdoor season since former Tiger Byron Logan in 1998 ... Went on to set a personal best in the 200 meters at 20.18 in the qualifying round at the NCAA Mideast Regional Championships to rank third in the history of LSU track and field ... Captured the NCAA Mideast Regional title in the 200 meters with a time of 20.21 in the final ... After sweeping 100-meter and 200-meter titles at the regional meet, was named the South Central Region Male Track Athlete of the Year by the USTFCCCA ... Ran the second leg of the Tigers’ 4x100-meter relay team that finished the season with a 6-1 record ... A member of the foursome that won the SEC title with a time of 38.67 at the SEC Outdoor meet ... In addition to winning the 4x100-meter relay at both the SEC and NCAA Championships, also ran on the foursome that won titles at the prestigious Texas Relays (38.74) and Penn Relays (39.18) in 2008 ... Was named the SEC Male Track Athlete of the Week three times during his senior season, including Jan. 29, Feb. 12 and April 8 ... After wrapping up his senior season at LSU, finished runner-up in the 100-meter dash at the Sagicor National Open Track and Field Championships in June where he earned the right to represent his native Trinidad and Tobago at the Games of the XXIX Olympiad in Beijing, China ... It marked his first career appearance in the Olympic Games.

    2007
    Enjoyed a breakout junior season as one of LSU’s premier sprinters in 2007 ... Made the trip to Osaka, Japan, in late August to compete in the IAAF World Championships in Athletics for the first time in his career ... Lined up in the 100-meter dash for his native Trinidad and Tobago ... Finished 31st in his debut after advancing to the quarterfinal round ... Qualified for the World Championships by placing second in the event at the Sagicor National Open Track and Field Championships with a blistering wind-aided time of 9.95 in the final ... Clocked the second-fastest time in LSU history with a wind-legal 10.09 in the semifinal round, tying Tiger great Xavier Carter on the school’s all-time performance list ... Earned his first career individual All-America honor during the collegiate season by placing fifth in the 100 meters at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships in June ... Ran the third leg on the Tigers’ 4x100-meter relay team that finished as the national runner-up during the outdoor season ... Foursome clocked a seasonal best and ninth-fastest time in school history at 38.85 in the final ... Also ran on the sprint relay team that defended its title at the NCAA Mideast Regional Championships and earned all-conference honors with a second-place finish at the SEC Outdoor Championships ... Anchored the sprint relay to its seventh title all-time at both the Texas Relays and Penn Relays ... Clocked an outdoor personal best in the 200 meters with a 20.90 at the Sun Angel Classic ... Individually, placed fourth in the 100 and sixth in the 200 at the outdoor conference meet ... Also finished 11th in the 100 meters at the NCAA Mideast Regional ... Broke the school record in the 60-meter dash during the indoor season, finishing second at the SEC Indoor Championships with a time of 6.64 in the final ... Eclipsed the old mark of 6.66 set by former LSU standout Kelly Willie during the 2006 season ... Made his first career appearance in the event at the NCAA Indoor Championships in March, finishing the meet in 10th place ... Finished 10th in the 200 meters at the SEC Indoor Championships.

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    Richard Thompson

    2006
    Ran the lead leg on LSU's national championship 4x100-meter relay team that clocked a sizzling 38.44 at the NCAA Outdoor Championships in June ... Also ran the lead leg on the 4x100 team that won titles at both the SEC Outdoor Championships (39.35) and NCAA Mideast Regional (39.12) ... Individually, posted a Page Ranking of 10.27 in the 100 meters in his final 100-meter race of the outdoor season at the Sagicor Championships on June 24 ... Was an NCAA Regional participant after posting a regional qualifying time of 10.43 in the 100 meters in the SEC Outdoor Championships ... Competed in the 60 meters during the indoor season ... Clocked a personal best of 6.73 in a first-place finish in the final heat of the LSU Invitational on March 3.

    2005
    Earned All-America honors during his freshman campaign, running the led leg on the Tigers' 4x100-meter relay team that finished fourth at the NCAA Championships (38.86) ... Also ran on the short relay teams that finished second at the NCAA Mideast Regional and the SEC Championships and first at the LSU Alumni Gold, the Sun Angel Classic and the Tiger Relays ... Individually, ran the 100 meters during the outdoor season ... Clocked a season-best wind-legal time of 10.66 at the SEC Championships ... Clocked a wind-aided 10.61 at the Bulldog Invitational ... Ran the 60-meter dash during the indoor campaign ... Top time of 6.83 came at the New Balance Collegiate Invitational ... Clocked 6.87 during both the prelims and finals of the Holiday Inn Team Invitational.
    HIGH SCHOOL

    Coached by Ashwin Creed at Queen's Royal College in Mount Hope, Trinidad ... Was named his school's Athlete of the Year in 2004 ... Came to LSU with personal bests of 10.55 in the 100 meters and 21.70 in the 200 meters ... Also played soccer as a prep.

    PERSONAL
    Born June 7, 1985 ... Son of Ruthven and Judith Thompson ... Has three siblings, Ruthven, Michelle and Natalie



    Surprise, shock at 'T&T's gold'
    Thompson's second



    THE coronation of the Trinidad and Tobago incarnation of Richard the Lionheart took place long before the 23-year-old sprinter bolted to silver in the Olympic Games men's 100 metres final at the Bird's Nest stadium, here in Beijing, China, on Saturday.
    Richard Thompson's silver success-T&T's 13th Olympic medal-shot him into global prominence. But the writing was on the wall many years ago, Ato Boldon having crowned him back in the 1990s.
    "That was so long ago," a laughing Thompson told the Express yesterday.
    "I was in Standard Five and he (Ato) came to Newtown Boys' to talk to us, to give us some advice and motivation. I told him that I was the fastest guy in Newtown Boys' at the time, and he said when he was in Newtown Boys' he was the fastest. He did a sign, he took his hand from over his head, and said 'I pass the crown over to you. You are the fastest guy.'"
    From the fastest in Newtown Boys' to Olympic silver medallist, Thompson has certainly come a long way.

    "His Majesty's" post-race celebrations on Saturday were uninhibited, but by the time he returned to the Olympic Village he was too tired to continue in the same vein.

    "I just went back home, took a shower and went to the cafeteria, got something to eat, and from there I went to sleep."
    Thompson's meal was not what you would call a royal feast.
    "McDonald's-three cheese burgers. I was eating healthy all the time before-chicken salads, fruit bowls and everything-so I felt as though I could treat myself a little bit. And from tomorrow (today) again, back to serious mode for the 4x1."

    Yesterday, the celebrations continued.
    "I went over to where my entire family is staying and we just spent some time together. It was just nice being around them, and everyone was so happy for me. I was so happy to have them here for this special moment."
    Following yesterday's medal ceremony, at the Bird's Nest stadium, Thompson described the "morning after" feeling.
    "I still felt like if it was a dream. Couldn't believe that I had actually won the silver medal. Every two minutes I'm thinking about it, and it's such a great feeling-just feels good to be part of history and to have my name up there with the greats. Definitely a great accomplishment for me."
    Thompson clocked 9.89 seconds to finish second to Jamaica's Usain Bolt, the gold medallist in a world-record time of 9.69. American Walter Dix was third in 9.91.

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    Shelly-Ann Fraser



    Shelly-Ann Fraser (born December 27, 1986) is a sprinter representing Jamaica at the 2008 Summer Olympics. Born in Kingston, Jamaica and running races barefoot in primary school, she later raced for Wolmer's High School For Girls. Fraser is the reigning Olympic champion over 100metres, clocking a time of 10.78.



    Fraser, who trained for the Olympics with teammate Asafa Powell, became the first Jamaican woman is history to win an Olympic gold medal in the 100 metres sprint. Three Jamaican sprinters, in fact, earned medal positions, with a photographic tie for second place between Sherone Simpson and Kerron Stewart (both earned silver medals).

    Personal Bests:

    100 Metres 10.78 0.00 Beijing (National Stadium) 17/08/2008
    200 Metres 22.15 1.10 Kingston (NS), JAM 29/06/2008




    Fraser expects great results in 100 metres

    KAYON RAYNOR
    Wednesday, August 13, 2008

    FRASER... I'm anticipating great results
    BEIJING, China - At a glance she is soft-spoken and shy.

    Even her smile resembles that of a young child. But don't let that fool you because when she takes the track she is as fierce a competitor as they come.

    New Jamaican sprint sensation, Shelly-Ann Fraser introduced herself to the world at June's National Track & Field Championship with a magnificent 10.85-second clocking to finish second in the 100m and book her ticket to the 29th Olympiad in China.

    And like her MVP teammate Asafa Powell, Fraser says sprinting runs in her family.

    "My mother (Maxine Simpson) is probably one of the biggest reasons why I'm running because she used to run and she stopped because she got pregnant with my big brother (24-year-old Omar). She also has a 20-year-old brother - Andrew.

    "My mother encourages me
    a lot and I really love her because when nobody else was there, she always made sure to provide for us (by peddling goods)," she related.

    The Stephen Francis-coached Fraser surprised most people at the National Stadium, including reigning World Championships 100m gold medallist Veronica Campbell-Brown, who crossed the finish line fourth in 10.88secs.

    "I've worked really hard for this, so it's an honour to go under 11 (seconds)," an overwhelmed Fraser told the Observer at the time.In fact, Fraser's 10.85secs clocking made her the joint fifth fastest Jamaican woman, along with Campbell-Brown, behind Merlene Ottey (10.74), Kerron Stewart (10.80), Sherone Simpson (10.82) and Juliet Cutbert (10.83).
    But just who is Shelly-Ann Fraser?

    "I'm very shy," she told the Observer with a smile so bright that it lit up the lobby of the Huibin Yuan Hotel located in the Tianjin Province in China on the penultimate day of Jamaica's mandatory 11-day track & field camp.

    "I'm humble that I really put in a lot of hard work to get to where I am now," the 21-year-old said, noting that she's "laid back and wants to achieve as much as possible".
    Fraser disclosed that she grew up under less than desirable circumstances in a close-knit family.

    "I was born in Kingston and grew up in a tenement yard in Waterhouse and went to George Headley Primary School on Baldwin Crescent in Duhaney Park," Fraser disclosed, adding that she first dabbled in track & field while attending George Headley.

    "I ran at Primary Champs bare-footed and my last year is actually when I won my first medal, coming second in the 100m and then I went to Wolmer's Girls' School," she said.
    "Wolmer's was like the (first) milestone, honestly, because that's what created who I am now," she reasoned, making special mention of her high school coach Michael Carr.Fraser won her first international medal at the 2005 Carifta Games in Trinidad & Tobago, clocking 11.73secs to take bronze in the 100m behind winner Kelly-Ann Baptiste.

    Incidentally, Fraser should come up against Baptiste, the 2008 NCAA champion, here in Beijing. She will also come face-to-face with the American trio of Torri Edwards, Muna Lee and reigning world silver medallist, Lauryn Williams.
    Despite the nervousness of competing in her first Olympics, Fraser, who won a silver medal in the 4x100 relay as an alternative who ran in the heats, is ready to deliver on the big stage.

    "I just want to go out there and do my best and I'm anticipating great results, so for me it's just great, honestly, to be here (in Beijing)," said Fraser. The diminutive sprinter, along with Jamaica's other 51 track and field athletes, arrived in Beijing at 4:00 pm yesterday after a three-hour bus drive from Tianjin.





    Last edited by LGN; 08-23-2008 at 05:54 AM.

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    Sherone Simpson



    Sherone Simpson (born August 12, 1984) is a track and field sprint athlete, competing internationally for Jamaica. She is a gold medalist in the 4 x 100 meter relay from the 2004 Olympics and silver medalist in 2005 World Champoinships and now is the silver medalist in the individual event at the 2008 Summer Olympics after she tied for second with Kerron Stewart in a photo finish. Simpson is coached by Stephen Francis in Kingston, Jamaica, where she attends the University of Technology. She is also a graduate of Manchester High.

    Simpson won the gold medal in the women's 200 m at the 2006 Commonwealth Games, beating Olympic champion Veronica Campbell and completing a Jamaican sweep of 100-200 m gold medals. Jamaica also won both sprint hurdles gold medals.

    With her personal best of 10.82 seconds in the 100 m, Simpson is ranked fourth among Jamaican women, behind Merlene Ottey,Shelly-Ann Fraser and Kerron Stewart. Simpson's 200 m personal best of 22.00 seconds ranks her sixth among Jamaican women behind Merlene Ottey, Grace Jackson, Juliet Cuthbert, Veronica Campbell-Brown and Kerron Stewart. She has run this time on two occasions.



    Medal Record

    Olympic Games
    Gold 2004 Athens 4x100 m relay
    Silver 2008 Beijing 100 metres

    World Championships
    Silver 2005 Helsinki 4x100 m relay

    Commonwealth Games
    Gold 2006 Melbourne 200 m
    Gold 2006 Melbourne 4 x 100 m


    Personal Bests
    Event Time Wind Place Date
    100 m 10.82 -0.7 Kingston, Jamaica June 24, 2006
    200 m 22.00 -0.3 Stockholm, Sweden July 25, 2006
    400 m 51.25 Kingston, Jamaica March 22, 2008

    Family elated at Simpson's silver streak
    published: Monday | August 18, 2008


    THE LITTLE community of Devon, four miles away from Christiana in Man-chester, erupted yesterday as Olympian Sherone Simpson claimed her first individual medal at the Beijing Games.

    Simpson crossed the finish line behind compatriot Shelly-Ann Fraser to share silver with another Jamaican, Kerron Stewart. Both Stewart and Simpson finished in 10.98 seconds.

    "We were so anxious and a bit nervous ... ," said her stepmother Leonie Simpson, " ... because last year she was suffering from injury. At the starting point, the father was so nervous, him couldn't even look at the TV."

    She added: "But it's when him hear me shout now him say something good happening and him look up."

    "I wanted her to carry home the gold medal," her grandfather, Wilbert Campbell, said.

    "But so long as as she win something, I feel good."

    Campbell said he always knew Sherone had the talent because her mother, Viviene, was a good athlete.

    "Her mother was a good runner. Yes, man. She run in school, but she never made it big because we was so rural," he said.

    The family is planning to celebrate Sherone's achievement when she arrives home.

    "I don't know what her father is planning, but we definitely have to do something," her stepmother said.

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    Sherone Simpson

    Sherone Simpson
    A star on and off the track (Article from 2005!)

    By LEIGHTON LEVY, Freelance Writer


    Sherone Simpson - Ian Allen

    A MERE 1.63 metres tall and barely 45 kgs in weight, Sherone Simpson is showing the world that she is a powerhouse on the track.

    A few months shy of her 21st birthday, Simpson is currently in the top five female sprinters on both the 100-metre and 200-metre world lists.

    Simpson clocked a fast 11.03 seconds at the National Stadium on May 7, in what was then the fastest time in the world this year. A week later in Santo Domingo, Simpson lowered her personal best of 22.70 in the 200 metres to a then world leading 22.46 seconds.

    Considering that both performances were early in the season, Simpson has clearly announced herself a medal contender at the upcoming World Athletics Championships in Helsinki this coming August.

    It was just last August that Simpson finished sixth in the Olympic 100-metre final in Athens, and then capped the meet by running a blistering second leg as a member of the first-ever Jamaican female sprint relay team to win a gold medal at the Olympic Games, all this while maintaining a healthy grade point average as a business and management major at the University of Technology (UTech).

    For her achievements on and off the track while she was away competing in Santo Domingo on May 14, Simpson was named Sportswoman of the Year at UTech and awarded the President's Pin for her academic excellence.

    In short, it has been a wonderful 10 months for the little woman from Manchester.

    "It has been good," she said, temporarily at a loss for words to describe her accomplishments over the last year.

    She reveals though that it is a challenge maintaining such levels of excellence both on the track and in the classroom.

    "Balancing academics and track and field is very hard. Waking up for the morning sessions at 5 o' clock and then to be ready for class at 8 o'clock is tedious but both are important and I try to place emphasis on both. I now have a 3.6 Grade Point Average (GPA) and I am hoping to maintain that until I finish UTech in two years. I was so happy to hear that I was a recipient of the President's Pin." Even more, she says, than her Sportswoman of the Year Award.

    "Because, people have it that most athletes can only perform well on the track and field but academically they are no good and I am happy that I am an exception and I do well in both."

    Life after track

    There is after all, life after track and field.

    "I really want to go into the tourism sector, especially in the hotel industry," she reveals. "I really have a love for it. I want to play a positive role in that industry. Tourism is very important to Jamaica and I want Sherone Simpson to be a part of that. So, I want to work in one of those big hotels and maybe later I can be a hotel manager."

    Growing up in Devon, Manchester, Simpson says she had a happy childhood playing cricket and running relays with her siblings. She attended the Christiana Leased Primary School where she says, her teachers always encouraged and supported her passion for track and field. She succeeded at the Common entrance examinations and was placed at Knox College, she says, but transferred to Manchester High because she thought the school offered her a better opportunity to successfully pursue her academic and athletic goals.

    She also enjoyed the love and support of her parents Audley Simpson and Vivienne Campbell. Her father, she says, has always been there for her, helping her make the right decisions and supporting her every step of the way.

    However, it was her mother who kept her from quitting track and field a few years into high school.

    "She lives in the Bahamas and normally I would spend summers with her. My first year in Class II, my performance (at Girls' Champs) wasn't good. I visited her that summer and we spoke. I told her that I was going to quit track and field and just concentrate on school. She said 'no, you know you're going to have rough times'.

    "I came back and decided to listen to her. My last year in Class II was very good. That's when my career started to shine. That's when I made the team to the CAC Championships in Barbados. I am happy I listened to her. I am happy I have a mother like that with whom I can sit down and talk about anything."

    As she has matured, she has been mentored by others as well. She names Ian Thorpe, a lecturer in the Faculty of Engineering at UTech, and Bruce James, president of the MVP Track Club, as being instrumental to her success as both student and athlete.

    "I am happy to have these people to help me with my decision-making," she says.

    So determined

    She learns a lot too from her world-class training partners Asafa Powell and Brigette Foster. I really admire Brigette's whole attitude to training. She is so determined; she'll not stop until she gets it right. I really appreciate training with her. Asafa really works hard and I especially watch when he is doing his starts because he's pretty good. I am happy that I have those two persons who I can emulate and try to adopt some of their positive ways to help me in my career."

    Laughing heartily, she admits she is lazy when it comes to training. Simpson says the exercise she hates the most is the clean and jerk but she is beginning to appreciate it for what it does for her.

    "When it comes to weight training the exercise I really don't like is the 'cleans', and last year I did no 'cleans' at all. But what I have come to realise is that that exercise helps with my explosiveness and now I am doing so well at 'the cleans'. Now that I am doing well, it gives me that push to train," she says.

    She has been doing so well in fact, she has even been surprising herself so far this season. She says that the 22.46 in Santo Domingo was done in cold, wet conditions and with a sore groin which forced her to 'walk' the curve. "I was so surprised by the time," she says. "I'm very, very satisfied, from 22.70 to 22.46, that's very, very good."

    The 200 metres, however, is not a certainty in her future.

    "If I see that I am doing well in the 200 and the 100 metres, especially the 200, I will stick to the double because if I am doing well, why not do them."

    Word from the camp is that Simpson is capable of going as fast as 10.7s this season. It is a target she struggles to embrace.

    "When you think of that time, it takes a lot of work physically, mentally. You have to think 10.7 straight through, when you're training, when you go to bed, before every race, 10.7, 10.7, and let me tell you that takes a lot of work, and right now I am not there yet. Right now I am not thinking about 10.7, I just want to break the 11 seconds barrier."

    Simpson has come to appreciate how much she has accomplished but it still has not diminished her desire for greater individual success. The sweet taste of the relay gold medal in Athens has only served to whet her appetite and she craves for so much more starting at the World Champion-ships in just over two months' time.

    "It really, really gives me that drive for that individual medal." she says, her voice pregnant with the anticipation of what the future holds.

    "At 19 years old, my first senior, major meet, I made the final of the 100 metres, placed sixth and then a gold medalist. That is a lot. Just making the final of the 100 metres is a major accomplishment. So, it really gives me that drive. I want to start from the world championships, maybe not aiming for a gold medal but just to medal in the 100 metres and then at the next Olympics aiming for a gold medal. That is at the top of my agenda."

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    Kerron Stewart




    Kerron Stewart (born 16 April 1984) is a Jamaican sprinter who specializes in the 100 metres. She is the 2008 Jamaican national champion in the 100 meters clocking 10.80s. She defeated World Champion Veronica Campbell-Brown in the process and now is the 2008 Summer Olympics silver medalist after she tied with Sherone Simpson in a time of 10.98s. She also
    earned a bronze medal in the 200 metres at the 2008 Summer Olympics with a personal best time of 21.99s. She was born in Kingston.



    Achievements

    Year Tournament Venue Result Extra

    2000 World Junior Championships Santiago, Chile
    2nd 4 x 100 m relay

    2001 World Youth Championships Debrecen, Hungary
    2nd 100 m 2nd Medley relay

    2002 World Junior Championships Kingston, Jamaica
    4th 100 m
    1st 4 x 100 m relay


    2007 World Championships Osaka, Japan
    7th 100 m
    2nd 4 x 100 m relay


    2008 Beijing
    2nd 100 m
    3rd 200 m

    Medal Record

    Olympic Games
    Silver 2008 Beijing 100 metres
    Bronze 2008 Beijing 200 metres

    World Championships
    Silver 2007 Osaka 4x100 m relay

    College Profile

    The Auburn University Official Athletic Site - Track & Field

    2007 NCAA Champion (60m/200m)
    2007 SEC Champion (60m/200m)
    2007 National Indoor Track Athlete of the Year
    2007 South Region Indoor Track Athlete of the Year
    2007 SEC Women's Indoor Track Runner of the Year
    2006 Outdoor All-American (100m/200m/4x100m relay)
    2006 Indoor All-American (60m/200m/4x400m relay)
    2006 SEC Outdoor Champion (100m/4x400m relay)
    2006 SEC Indoor Champion (55m/200m)
    2006 SEC Women's Outdoor Track Runner of the Year
    2006 Mideast Region Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year
    2006 South District Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year
    2006 South Region Indoor Track Athlete of the Year


    2007 Indoor: Named SEC Runner of the Year and USTFCCCA National Runner of the Year after capturing the SEC and NCAA Championships in the 60m and the 200m ... Named an All-American for the seventh and eighth time as a collegian, which makes her the second-most decorated Auburn female athlete in school history in that category ... Became only the second athlete in Auburn history to win two national titles at one NCAA Championships ... Named South Region Indoor Track Athlete of the Year by the USTFCCCA ... Set school, meet and facility records with her times in the 60m (7.14) and 200m (22.46) at the SEC Championships ... Won 60m and 200m races at the Tyson Invitational ... Also participated on one 4x400 relay at the Clemson Invitational and in one 400m race at the Diet Pepsi Invitational.


    2006 Outdoor: Was the national runner-up in both the 100m and 200m at the NCAA Championships, and anchored Auburn's fifth-place 4x400m relay team ... Posted a time of 11.36 into a headwind in the 100m, finishing just 0.02 seconds behind the race winner ... Set a new school record in the finals of the 200m, racing to a time of :22.65, which was just 0.03 behind the winner ... Became just the second Auburn female athlete to earn three All-American honors at one NCAA Outdoor Championship meet, joining Elva Goulbourne in 2003 ... Also became the second Auburn track and field athlete, male or female, to win six All-American honors in one year, again joining Goulbourne in 2003 ... Was named SEC Women's Outdoor Track Runner of the Year after winning the 100m in an SEC record time of 11.03 seconds, finishing second in the 200m in 22.85, helping the 4x400m relay team win in 3:31.35 and anchoring the fourth-place 4x100m relay time to a time of 44.59 ... Her time of 11.03 in the 100m was at the time the fastest mark in the world in 2006 ... Was named by the U.S. Track and Field and Cross Country Coaches Association as the NCAA Division I Women's Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year for the Mideast Region, and the South District Women's Outdoor Track Athlete of the Year ... Won the 100m and helped the 4x100m relay team place second at the NCAA Mideast Regional ... Helped the 4x400m relay team place second at the Penn Relays with a school-record time of 3:27.93 ... Won the 100m and was part of the winning 4x100m relay team at the Auburn Invitational ... Won the 200m and helped the 4x100m relay team win at the Sun Angel Classic ... Also ran on the winning 4x100m relay team at the Yellow Jacket Invitational.


    2006 Indoor: Earned All-American honors in the 55m, 200m and as part of Auburn's 4x400m relay team ... Became only the fifth Auburn track and field athlete, male or female, to earn All-American honors in three events at one NCAA indoor championship meet ... Finished fourth in the 60m in 7.23 seconds, just 0.03 seconds behind the winner ... Was sixth in the 200m (22.98) and ran the third leg on Auburn's second-place 4x400m relay team that set a school record in 3:29.50 ... Was named the NCAA Division I Women's Indoor Track Athlete of the Year for the South Region ... Earned the Commissioner's Trophy at the SEC Indoor Championships as the highest female point scorer at the meet ... Won the 55m and the 200m at the SEC Championships, and ran on the second-place 4x400m relay team ... Her winning time of 6.71 seconds in the 55m was a new school record ... Posted a mark of 22.97 seconds in the 200m at the Tyson Invitational, posting the fifth fastest time in the world that year at the time and the second-best mark in Auburn indoor history ... Won the 55m at the Pepsi Invitational in 6.85 seconds.


    Prior To Auburn: Won the 60m and the 200m at the 2004 NJCAA Indoor Championships ... Placed second in both events at the 2005 NJCAA Indoor Championships ... First-team NJCAA Outdoor All-American in the 100m in 2004 and second-team in the 200m in 2004 and 2005.

    Personal: Born April 16, 1984 ... Daughter of Winnifred Carnegie and Fernandez Stewart ... Majoring in adult education ... Lists her goals for 2006 as running 11.06 in the 100m and 22.70 in the 200m.




    Caribbean's time to shine, says Stewart

    CMC
    Friday, August 22, 2008



    BEIJING, China (CMC) - Sprinter Kerron Stewart said yesterday the Caribbean had come of age, following the region's clean sweep of the sprint events at the Beijing Olympics here.

    The 24-year-old Jamaican, who copped bronze in the women's 200 metres won by countrywoman Veronica Campbell-Brown yesterday, said the playing field was now level and the Caribbean would now shine.

    "I think it's our time to show what the Caribbean really has and we are coming around at the right time because it seems like the playing field is level now.," said Stewart, who took joint silver along with compatriot Sherone Simpson in the 100 metres.

    ".We know that as long as it is level and everybody is running on the same playing field, we can do what we've always been doing."

    The Caribbean, led by the mighty Jamaicans, dominated the sprint events in both the men's and women's categories here.

    While the amazing Usain Bolt clinched both the men's sprints, Shelly-Ann Frazier took gold in the 100 metres while Campbell-Brown put the icing on the cake with her 200- metres triumph.

    Trinidadian Richard Thompson was also good for silver in the men's 100 metres and the Netherland Antilles' Churandy Martini finished second in the 200 metres before he was disqualified for a lane infringement.

    Stewart said she was not disappointed by her bronze medal as she had aimed to finish in the top three.

    "I felt good. I just wanted to be on that podium because I knew I had run enough races, so I just wanted to hold on and take whatever medal I could get," she said.

    "I'm a Jamaican, we know how to fight so that's one thing I can say, as a kid growing up I had great examples to follow, that hard work does pay off."

    Stewart can claim her third medal of the Games today when Jamaica line up in the 4x100 metres relay. They are the heavy favourites to win after the United States were disqualified in the qualifying heats yesterday.

    "I am definitely looking forward to that. Growing up, relays were fundamental so you can't leave the Olympic Games without running 4x100, so I'm ready for that," she smiled

    Caribbean's time to shine, says Stewart - JAMAICAOBSERVER.COM

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    Jamaica 1,2,2! (No Bronze, Just Silver!)



    Shelly-Ann Fraser (R) of Jamaica celebrates winning the Women's 100m Final and the gold medal held at the National Stadium on Day 9 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 17, 2008 in Beijing, China. Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica finished the event in first place with a time of 10.78.






    (L-R) Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica celebrates winning the Women's 100m Final and the gold medal with teammates Kerron Stewart and Sherone Simpson held at the National Stadium on Day 9 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 17, 2008 in Beijing, China. Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica finished the event in first place with a time of 10.78.
    (Photo by Lars Baron/Bongarts)



    (L-R) Joint silver medalists Sherone Simpson and Kerron Stewart of Jamaica and Gold medalists Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica celebrate after in the Women's 100m Final held at the National Stadium on Day 9 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 17, 2008 in Beijing, China. Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica finished the event in first place with a time of 10.78.
    (Photo by Michael Steele/Getty Images AsiaPac)



    (L-R) Joint silver medalist Sherone Simpson of Jamaica, gold medalist Shelly-Ann Fraser of Jamaica and Joint silver medalist Kerron Stewart of Jamaica stand on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women's 100m Final at the National Stadium on Day 10 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 18, 2008 in Beijing, China.

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    Veronica Campbell-Brown



    Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica receives the gold medal during the medal ceremony for the Women's 200m Final held at the National Stadium during Day 13 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 21, 2008 in Beijing, China.
    (Photo by Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts)

    Veronica Campbell-Brown (born May 15, 1982) is a track and field sprint athlete, competing internationally for Jamaica. A five-time Olympic medalist, she is the current Olympic 200 m and World 100 m champion. She ran the 200 meter in 21.74 seconds.


    Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica crosses the line to win the Women's 200m Final and the gold medal held at the National Stadium during Day 13 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 21, 2008 in Beijing, China

    Early life

    Campbell was born to Cecil Campbell and Pamella Bailey in Trelawny, Jamaica on May 15th, 1982. She has 9 brothers and sisters and attended Vere Technical High School in Clarendon before pursuing higher education in the U.S.

    Junior career

    In 1999, she won 2 gold medals the 100m and 4x100m at the inaugural IAAF World Youth Championships. The following year, she became the first female to win the sprint double at the IAAF World Junior Championships. She took the 100m in 11.12, the current championship record and the 200m in 22.87. At the 2000 Olympic Games, she ran the second leg on the silver medal winning 4x100m relay team.

    Campbell is the only female athlete to win both the 100 m and 200 m sprints at the same World Youth Championships.

    College career

    Campbell attended Barton County Community College in Great Bend, Kansas, where she set several records and won many titles including 4 national junior college titles in the 60, 100 and 200 meter dashes indoors and outdoors. She set the current record for Barton County in the outdoor 100 and 200 meter dashes. Campbell also excelled in academics earning an Associates Degree from Barton County in 2002 with a 3.8 grade average. She went on to attend The University of Arkansas where she stood out as a sprint star in a program dominated by long-distance runners.


    Veronica Campbell-Brown of Jamaica celebrates winning the Women's 200m Final and the gold medal held at the National Stadium during Day 13 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 21, 2008 in Beijing, China.
    (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images AsiaPac)

    Professional career

    At the 2004 Olympics, Campbell first placed third in the 100 meters and two days later won the 200 meters, beating out Allyson Felix of the United States. She later teamed up with Aleen Bailey, Tayna Lawrence, and Sherone Simpson to win the 4 x 100 meter relay race.
    In August 2005, Campbell won the silver medal in the 100 meters at the 2005 World Championships in Athletics as well as another silver medal in the 4 x 100 meter relay (together with Daniele Browning, Aleen Bailey and Sherone Simpson).
    At the 2007 World Championships, Campbell won three medals with a gold in the 100 meters, a silver in the 200 meters (second to Felix) and a silver in the 4 x 100 meter relay.
    At the 2008 Jamaican Olympic trials, she finished 4th in the 100m, thereby missing the qualifying requirement to automatically make the Jamaican Olympic roster for that event. She clocked 10.88 in the final, which is the second fastest time ever for a 4th place finish. She however bounced back to take the 200m final in a personal best of 21.94 seconds.[1] On July 3 it was announced that she was denied a spot in the 100 meters in Beijing, even though she is the reigning World Champion. She will therefore only compete in the 200 and the 4x100 relay at the Olympic Games. At the opening ceremony of the 2008 Olympics, Veronica Campbell-Brown carried the Jamaican flag during the Athletes' Parade. She successfully defended her Olympic 200m title in a new personal best time of 21.74sec, a time which puts her equal seventh on the all-time list.

    Medal Record

    Olympic Games

    Gold 2008 Beijing 200 m
    Gold 2004 Athens 200 m
    Gold 2004 Athens 4x100 m relay
    Silver 2000 Sydney 4x100 m relay
    Bronze 2004 Athens 100 m

    World Championships

    Gold 2007 Osaka 100 m
    Silver 2005 Helsinki 100 m
    Silver 2005 Helsinki 4x100 m relay
    Silver 2007 Osaka 200 m
    Silver 2007 Osaka 4x100 m relay


    Year Tournament Venue Event
    Place Result
    1998 World Junior Championships Annecy, France
    100 m 17th 12.04

    1999 World Youth Championships Bydgoszcz, Poland
    100 m 1st 11.49

    2000 World Junior Championships Santiago, Chile
    100 m 1st 11.12
    200 m 1st 22.87

    2002 Commonwealth Games Manchester, England
    100 m 2nd 11.00

    2004 Olympic Games Athens, Greece

    100m 3rd 10.97
    200 m 1st 22.05

    World Athletics Final Monaco, Monaco
    100 m 1st 10.91
    200 m 1st 22.64

    2005 World Championships Helsinki, Finland
    100 m 2nd 10.95
    200 m 4th 22.38

    VCB's Personal Website

    Olympic Gold Medalist and World Champion Runner: Veronica Campbell-Brown

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    Ibrahim Camejo

    [/

    Ibrahim Camejo (born 28 June 1982) is a Cuban long jumper.
    He won the bronze medals at the 2005 Central American and Caribbean Championships and the 2006 Central American and Caribbean Games. He then won the more prestigious bronze medal at the 2008 Olympic Games. He also competed at the 2005 World Championships without reaching the final round.
    His personal best jump is 8.46 metres, achieved in June 2008 in Bilbao.

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    Shericka Williams



    Shericka Williams (born September 17, 1985) is a Jamaican sprinter and former student of St. Elizabeth Technical High School.

    Together with Novlene Williams, Ronetta Smith and Lorraine Fenton she won a silver medal in 4 x 400 metres relay at the 2005 World Championships in Athletics. She also competed in the individual contest, but was knocked out in the semifinal. Two years later, she won another silver medal in the 4 x 400 metres relay event at the 2007 World Championships in Athletics, this time with Shereefa Lloyd, Davita Prendagast and Novlene Williams. The team set a national record in that race, finishing second to the United States in a time of 3:19:73.

    At the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, China, Williams won the silver medal in the 400 metres in a personal-best time of 49.69 seconds.

    Personal bests

    200 metres - 22.55 (2006)
    400 metres - 49.69 (2008)


    Medal record

    Beijing Olympics 2008
    Silver 400 m

    World Championships

    Silver
    2005 Helsinki
    4x400 m relay

    Silver
    2007 Osaka
    4x400 m relay



    (L-R) Silver medalist Shericka Williams of Jamaica, gold medalist Christine Ohuruogu of Great Britain and bronze medalist Sanya Richards of the United States stand on the podium during the medal ceremony for the Women's 400m Final held at the National Stadium on Day 11 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 19, 2008 in Beijing, China.
    (Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images AsiaPac)
    Last edited by LGN; 08-23-2008 at 06:21 AM.

  15. #15
    LGN
    Registered User LGN's Avatar LGN is offline
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    Melaine Walker



    Melaine Walker (born 1 January 1983) is a Jamaican hurdler and a past student of the St. Jago High School .Walker won the 400 m hurdles Gold at the 2008 Olympics in a new Olympic record of 52.64. She was born in Kingston.


    Achievements

    Year Tournament Venue Result Event
    1998 World Junior Championships Annecy, France 5th 200 m
    3rd 4x100 m relay

    1999 World Youth Championships Bydgoszcz, Poland 2nd 200 m
    6th 100 m hurdles

    2000 World Junior Championships Santiago, Chile 3rd 400 m hurdles
    2nd 4x400 m relay

    2002 World Junior Championships Kingston, Jamaica 2nd 400 m hurdles
    2006 Central American and Caribbean Games Cartagena, Colombia 3rd 400 m hurdles
    2nd 4x400 m relay

    2007 World Athletics Final Stuttgart, Germany 3rd 400 m hurdles

    2008 Olympic Games Beijing, China 1st 400 m hurdles




    Melaine Walker of Jamaica celebrates with her countries flag after winning the Women's 400m Hurdles Final at the National Stadium during Day 12 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 20, 2008 in Beijing, China.
    (Photo by Adam Pretty/Getty Images AsiaPac)

    Personal bests

    60 metres hurdles - 8.05 s (2006, indoor)
    100 metres hurdles - 12.75 s (2006)
    400 metres hurdles - 52.64 s (2008)
    60 metres - 7.40 s (2005, indoor)
    200 metres - 23.67 s (1998)
    400 metres - 51.61 s (2008)



    Melaine Walker of Jamaica receives the gold medal during the medal ceremony for the Women's 400m Hurdles Final held at the National Stadium during Day 13 of the Beijing 2008 Olympic Games on August 21, 2008 in Beijing, China.

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