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Thread: The term 'dreads' or 'dreadlocks'

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    Imix Official Prima Donna Prinzez Diva's Avatar Prinzez Diva is offline
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    The term 'dreads' or 'dreadlocks'

    OH MY GOSH I HATE THAT TERM, I usually try to shy away from the term because I believe that there is nothing dreadful from that locs. I often find myself being offended when someone refers to my hair as dreads. How do you feel about that term?

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    I'm in love triniprincess76's Avatar triniprincess76 is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prinzez Diva
    OH MY GOSH I HATE THAT TERM, I usually try to shy away from the term because I believe that there is nothing dreadful from that locs. I often find myself being offended when someone refers to my hair as dreads. How do you feel about that term?
    A Jamaican friend of mine has locs and we were talking one day, and someone walked by us, and was like man, you girls have really nice dreads...

    I didn't say anything, but she asked the person kindly to not refer to them as dreads, 'cause that makes it sound negative...as if it's something nasty, or dreadful...I never thought of it like that before, so I'm careful to refer to it as locs whenever I talk to people, because I don't know who dislikes the term dreads or dreadlocks...it doesn't really bother me personally though when I hear people say dreads.

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    Dawtah of the Sun Empressdududahlin's Avatar Empressdududahlin is offline
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    I personally try not to say dreadlocks...because of the feeling of the word "dread" sometimes I say locks but I do find myself calling someone a "dread". Dreadlocks is the term given. Read this link about the History of the hair. Even though they say it throughout this reading I have to wonder what did the earlier cultures called them?


    The History of Dreadlocks

    by Bouneith Inejnema Naba

    Many times I have heard friends admit to me that, because they have dreadlocks, they have been approached in the street by someone who wanted to sell them marijuana. The sellers approached these individuals solely because they had dreadlocked hair; none of the individuals used drugs or associated with those who do use. Dreadlocks have become so much associated with Rastafarian culture, which is, in turn, associated with smoking ganga, that few people know the real roots and history of dreadlocked hair. What are the traditional origins and meanings of dreadlocks?

    New-generation Rastafarians will tell you that the culture of locked hair came, originally, from Africa, but any knowledge beyond the continent that locks came from is unknown. Where old-generation Rastafarians hold great pride in their natural hair and see it as a symbol of their fight against Babylon, non-violence, non-conformity, communalism and solidarity, and as a heavy spiritual statement, many new-generation Rastas see their dreads as a passport to smoking ganga and listening to Reggae music, not understanding the real Rastafarian culture and values. Where Rastafarians once shunned everything from Babylon, such as soda, alcohol and cigarettes, modern Rastas are often seen smoking, wearing designer clothing, eating meat and drinking beer. Wearing your hair “naturally” has become more of a status symbol than a spiritual decision, and people begin locking their hair so that they are seen as conscious, afrocentric, or different, rather than for honest spiritual and conscious reasons.

    Dreadlocks have been a part of the history of every spiritual system. From Christianity to Hinduism, locked hair has been been a symbol of a highly spiritual person who is trying to come closer to God(s). If one is to research the spiritual history and meaning of locks, they will be mentioned in all holy books (the biblical Sampson wore his hair in dreadlocks, and his unsurpassed strength was lost when Delilah cut off his seven locks of hair) and cultures. Dreadlock’s roots are commonly traced back to Hinduism and the God Shiva, but stops there. Meanwhile, most people recognize that dreadlocks have their origin in Africa, but nobody seems to know where, how or why! As with everything else, the true origins of dreadlocks can be found in Kemet (Africa).

    “Originally, dreadlocks were the mark of spiritual status,” Dogon Priest and Kemetic Spiritual Master Naba Lamoussa Morodenibig of The Earth Center explained in an interview. “Priests of diverse Deities were required, at least for a specific period of time, to have dreadlocks. For example, priests of Deities that are involved in the healing of the body and with procreation, such as Wsr, Heru, Theouris and Sekhmet, are required to have dreadlocks. There is a period of seven to thirteen years that a priest of these Deities must let their hair grow freely and devote themselves completely to the Deity. During this time, the priest has a role of responsibility towards the God and the temple. After that time period, if they want to cut their hair, a ceremony is done and they can remove their locks if they choose. Interest-ingly, for other Deities, like Aishat, one must shave every hair on their body when serving that God or Goddess. It depends on which God and temple is being served.”

    What is it about hair that is so important for priests and temples? “It is a notion of purity. Hairs are huge emitters and receptors. When one is in an area, such as a temple, where the flow of energy must be tightly controlled, hair becomes either very helpful or very disturbant, depending on the energetic needs,” Master Naba explained. “Even when a hair falls off of the body, it does not lose its qualities, and it can become a big disturbance to the flow of energy.” Even animals that are sacrificed are checked thoroughly for a specific type of fur. It is not every ram or cow that can be used in a ceremony - it is only a priest who can safely determine whether an animal is fit for sacrifice, and it is a heavy responsibility to do so. The untrained eye will think that any animal will do, but if there is one piece of the wrong kind of fur on an animal, it cannot be used!

    It is known that many Pharaohs had locked hair, and on Tutankhamen’s mummy, dreadlocks can still be found intact. How did dreadlocks become such a symbol of Rastafarian belief and culture rather than of African spirituality? Master Naba offered his knowledge: “Dreadlocks in spirituality has a very high value. During pre-colonial Africa, healers and priests in many parts of the continent carried dreadlocks, and every religion that has come has adopted the idea of either having dreadlocks or shaving all hair on the body. In the Bible, it states that those who don’t shave, drink alcohol or eat meat are the closest to God; Jesus himself is shown with long hair! In Islam, shaving is seen as a value of cleanliness. To associate dreadlocks with only Rastafarianism is unfair. But, in the history of Black people, Rastafarianism became a politico-spiritual movement after the prophesy of Marcus Garvey surfaced. It gave Black people a spirit of hope, and the Rastafarian then adopted the attitudes of African priests: they kept their hair like a priest, did not eat red meat, drink alcohol, use drugs or smoke cigarettes. They decided to stay spiritually hopeful, and the dreadlocks represented, instead of a priest serving a temple for seven years, a period of time spent waiting for something to happen.”

    Dreadlocks carry a very heavy spiritual meaning that is virtually unknown in today’s modern society. Now worn as a fashion statement, a political message, or as a rebellion, many people, young and old alike, have no idea what dreadlocks mean spiritually, and they do not know the position they are putting themselves in by having locked hair. “Dreadlocks carry the notion of devotion and sacrifice to the Deities, according to the spiritual rules,” says Master Naba, the only Dogon/Kemetic priest who has been commis-sioned by the committee of elders in Africa to bring initiatic knowledge outside of trad-itional initiation camps. “Dread-locks carry a very heavy spiritual bur-den. It is only people that have conscious-ly decided to take a vow of purity and to follow all of the seventy-seven commandments and apply them to all aspects of their lives that should wear dreadlocks. People of any race or gender can wear them, because spirit-ually we are the same, but the one who has dreadlocks must understand the spiritual meaning behind them if they do not want to face negative consequences.”

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    Registered User sapphyre's Avatar sapphyre is offline
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    i definitely don't like the term dreads but like you i find myself using it from time to time but only when referring to an individual not the hair itself. sometimes i get annoyed because i find that when i use the term locs (as opposed to dreads) people lookin at me like i have two heads

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    SocaLuvinYardieGyal Caribsun's Avatar Caribsun is offline
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    I'm glad someone raised this issue.

    Though I understand everyone's position, it doesn't offend me at all. Though it has become more politically correct to call them locs and not dreads, I use both terms. Though some folks use to the terms to distinguish cultivated locs from ones that are born out of neglect, the average person is not going to know that difference, nor should they care. If a person tells me I have nice dreds, I say thanks and keep going. They could be saying or doing worse things to me. In the end it's not worth the time nor energy to get offended when someone calls them dreds. Many years ago, I used to get very turned off by people who wanted to exist in their natural state (wearing locs, fros, etc..) who would sweat the small stuff. When they tried to correct every word and phrase from a well-intentioned person, they came off as self-righteous and arrogant; thus they failed miserably at their goal, which was to "educate." If the person is paying a compliment or refers to the hair in a non-threatening manner as dreds, I know they mean no harm. Our self esteem is high enough to deal with that because we're wearing this style now. We know that they're not dreadful, and that will come across in how we carry ourselves. People will never stop calling them dreds. We will remove the "dread" from dreadlocks when we show people how powerful, regal, and sexy they are when we proudly sport them. That's what is going to remove the stigma. Constantly correcting people will not. Now, if dem call mi "dutty locs," "######################## locs," or "umfufu," I will have to verbally kick their a$$.
    Educate those who truly want to know the difference, but it's not worth the effort to correct everyone.
    Last edited by Caribsun; 11-18-2005 at 07:47 PM.

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    ........ G.T. socalova's Avatar G.T. socalova is offline
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    Dread is de name for it... most of the time when someone uses de term dey don't even think of the word "dread" as it is. I don't think it's offensive. I am not a dread, so I feel I have very little to say on de matter. But, I think dreads are beautiful. I could also refer to it as locs, I guess, but I don't ever use dat term.

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    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
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    The History Of Dreadlocks
    by Vic D http://www.static-void.com


    Left to its own devices, hair will naturally knot together and form mats or "dreadlocks". Upon seeing Dreadlocks, most people think of Bob Marley, reggae, and Rastafarianism, unaware that the roots of Dreadlocks go back much further, to at least 2500 BCE with the Dreadlocked Vedic deity Shiva and his followers.

    Dreadlocks are a universal phenomenon in the East as well as in the West. Spiritualists of all faiths and backgrounds incorporate into their paths a disregard for physical appearances and vanity. And so, throughout the world, such seekers often cease to comb, cut, or otherwise dress their hair: This is how "dreadlocks" are born.

    In the West, the Nazarite is most widely known for developing Dreadlocks. In the East, Yogis, Gyanis, and Tapasvis of all sects are the most famous bearers of Dreadlocks.

    Dreadlocks, then, are universally symbolic of a spiritualist's understanding that vanity and physical appearances are unimportant. The counterpart to Dreadlocks is the shaven head, which has the same aim: disregard for vanity associated with physical appearances. Usually we find that spiritualists whose religious path includes elaborate rituals tend to embrace the shaven head technique as it affords a level of ritual cleanliness, while those mystics who adopt meditative or otherwise non-ritualistic paths prefer to disregard the hair altogether and thus develop Dreadlocks.

    Dreadlocks are more than just a symbolic statement of disregard for physical appearance. Both Eastern and Western Traditions hold that bodily, mental and spiritual energies mainly exit the body through the top of the head and the hair. If the hair is knotted, they believe, the energy remains within the hair and the body, keeping a person more strong and healthy.

    An excellent example from Western tradition is biblical Sampson, whose unsurpassed strength was lost when Delilah cut off his *seven* locks of hair. In classical India, all students on the spiritual path were directly enjoined by their scriptures to develop Dreadlocks as a means to detach them from physical vanity and aid them in the development of bodily strength and
    supernatural mental and spiritual powers.

    As the world moved into the Industrial Era, Dreadlocks were rarely seen anywhere outside of India. However, at the turn of the Twentieth Century, a socio-religious movement started in Harlem, NY by Marcus Garvey found an enthusiastic following amongst the Black population of Jamaica. This eclectic group drew their influences from three primary sources (1) the Old
    and New Testaments, (2) African tribal culture, and (3) The Hindu culture that had recently become a pervasive cultural force in the West Indies.

    The followers of this movement called themselves "Dreads," signifying that they had a dread, fear, or respect for God. Emulating Hindu and Nazarite holymen, these "Dreads" grew matted locks of hair, which would become known to the world as "Dreadlocks" - the hair-style of the Dreads.


    Soon after, this group would focus their attention on the Ethiopian Emperor Ras Tafari, Haile Selassie, and thus became known as Rastafarians. But the term "Dreadlocks" stuck.

    Ever since becoming connected with the Rastafarians in the early 1900's, Dreadlocks have taken on, in addition to their original religious and spiritual significance, a potent social symbolism as well. Today, Dreadlocks signify spiritual intent, natural and supernatural powers, and are a statement of non-violent non-conformity, communalism and socialistic values,
    and solidarity with less fortunate or oppressed minorities.
    Last edited by Otorongo; 11-18-2005 at 08:47 PM.

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    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
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    The first writing we have about dreadlocks is in the Veda scriptures of India, the earliest piece is dated to 1800 BC. But many peoples and tribes have worn dreadlocks the Germanic tribes, the Greeks,Samson and other Nazorites, John the Baptist, the Pacific peoples, and the Naga Indians also wore dreadlocks. King Tut himself had dreadlocks, and they are still intact to this day. The Mau Mau tribe wore dreadlocks to intimidate the colonizers of Kenya in east Africa. Even Caesar claimed that the Celts wore dreadlocks by describing them as having "hair like snakes".

    The actual word dreadlocks comes from Jamaica, made up in the early movement of the Rastamen, dreadlocks came from the word dread for the meaning of fear and horror.

    Locks are now worn in India by Sadhus (holy men), the Somali, the Galla, the Maasai, the Mau Mau, the Kau, the Ashanti, the Fulani, the Aborigines, and the New Guineans.

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    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
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    Sadhu men wearing jaTaas




    Locks occur in EVERY culture:
    1. The bible speaks of locks so Hebrews, Christ, and early Christians must have had them.
    2. Most ancient cultures had not devolped a brush for a long time.
    3. King Tut's body, to this day, still has locks.
    4. Ancient Mayan artwork proves that they had Locks
    5. Aborigine tribesman to this day still have locks proving that their ancesters must have had them as well.
    6. Native New Guineans have/had locks.
    7. Hindu Sadhus out of tradition have locks, and so its been for a long time.
    8. Ceasar reported that Celtic tribes had "hair like snakes".
    9. The Muslim Whirling Dervishes of Sudan have locks.
    10. Various African tribes have locks.
    11. Ethiopian monks have locks.
    12. The longest hair in the world is one lock of a man in Thailand
    13. There are Sihks with locks.
    and so on and so on

    The Hindu/Dravidian term is jaTa or jaTaa
    The first known written records date back to 2500 BCE, when the dreadlocked Vedic deity Shiva and his followers were reported in the Vedic scriptures of India as "jaTaa", meaning "wearing twisted locks of hair", probably derived from the Dravidian word "caTai", which means to twist or to wrap.

    http://www.fortunecity.com/business/...readlocks.html
    http://spaces.msn.com/members/Kulummba/Blog/cns!1pCrofvjb7lK-NxXaM7OwaQw!2618.entry
    Last edited by Otorongo; 11-18-2005 at 08:48 PM.

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    Imix Official Prima Donna Prinzez Diva's Avatar Prinzez Diva is offline
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    WOW...THANKS everyone on all the insights on the culture of locs.

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    Dippity Doo-Dah SeReNDiPiTy is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Otorongo
    Sadhu men wearing jaTaas




    Locks occur in EVERY culture:
    1. The bible speaks of locks so Hebrews, Christ, and early Christians must have had them.
    2. Most ancient cultures had not devolped a brush for a long time.
    3. King Tut's body, to this day, still has locks.
    4. Ancient Mayan artwork proves that they had Locks
    5. Aborigine tribesman to this day still have locks proving that their ancesters must have had them as well.
    6. Native New Guineans have/had locks.
    7. Hindu Sadhus out of tradition have locks, and so its been for a long time.
    8. Ceasar reported that Celtic tribes had "hair like snakes".
    9. The Muslim Whirling Dervishes of Sudan have locks.
    10. Various African tribes have locks.
    11. Ethiopian monks have locks.
    12. The longest hair in the world is one lock of a man in Thailand
    13. There are Sihks with locks.
    and so on and so on

    The Hindu/Dravidian term is jaTa or jaTaa
    The first known written records date back to 2500 BCE, when the dreadlocked Vedic deity Shiva and his followers were reported in the Vedic scriptures of India as "jaTaa", meaning "wearing twisted locks of hair", probably derived from the Dravidian word "caTai", which means to twist or to wrap.

    http://www.fortunecity.com/business/...readlocks.html
    http://spaces.msn.com/members/Kulummba/Blog/cns!1pCrofvjb7lK-NxXaM7OwaQw!2618.entry
    THAT IS SOOOOOOOOOO COOOOOOOOOOLLLLLLLL

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    Baby Luv Sencia's Avatar Sencia is offline
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    Talking

    Otorongo- beautiful job luv. u save me alot of work

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    Knowledge is a hell of a thing...

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    Salsero de pura cepa Otorongo's Avatar Otorongo is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prinzez Diva
    OH MY GOSH I HATE THAT TERM, I usually try to shy away from the term because I believe that there is nothing dreadful from that locs. I often find myself being offended when someone refers to my hair as dreads. How do you feel about that term?
    dreadlocks does not come from a description of the hair.
    Rastafarian theology emphasises individual apprehension of God (called Jah), and one who is "dread," that is, God-fearing, a belief that is referred to theologically as "theosis," or God-becoming.

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    be like water DeSocaPrincess's Avatar DeSocaPrincess is offline
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    learned a lot todat thanks guys
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