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Thread: Trinizagada

  1. #1
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Trinizagada

    If i make a typo in the member's name can a mod fix it please.

    I remembered you said you had some clout with the radio stations owner....

    If you recall you had us listen to a show with Wellington, you said you will try to get it to post so those that missed it can listen...since you are back now can you try to get it to us or if you can remember I have a specific question about it.
    Last edited by Amare Triniboi; 12-05-2011 at 08:15 AM.

  2. #2
    Banned Trinizagada is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ushawishi View Post
    If i make a typo in the member's name can a mod fix it please.

    I remembered you said you had some clout with the radio stations owner....

    If you recall you had us listen to a show with Wellington, you said you will try to get it to post so those that missed it can listen...since you are back now can you try to get it to us or if you can remember I have a specific question about it.
    I never said that I have clout.... I said the owner of the radio station "Mr. Kenny Phillips" of KMP music studios (whose son is Kasey Phillips of Precision Productions) is a good friend.

    Now regarding the interview that was broadcasted (and listened by the imix crew)... the outcome was pretty simple. That show alluded to the fact that Wellington's music was more in line with what we know as soca ( in other words they did not support the Lord Shorty camp)... what else do you wish to know?

    I guess you want to listen to the podcast of the show... Ok I will contact Kenny (he is busy as hell now ok) and see if he or Ellsworth can pull the program. If and when I get it I will post it here, ok.....
    Last edited by Trinizagada; 12-05-2011 at 11:45 AM.

  3. #3
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    I never said that I have clout.... I said the owner of the radio station "Mr. Kenny Phillips" of KMP music studios (whose son is Kasey Phillips of Precision Productions) is a good friend.

    Now regarding the interview that was broadcasted (and listened by the imix crew)... the outcome was pretty simple. That show alluded to the fact that Wellington's music was more in line with what we know as soca ( in other words they did not support the Lord Shorty camp)... what else do you wish to know?

    I guess you want to listen to the podcast of the show... Ok I will contact Kenny (he is busy as hell now ok) and see if he or Ellsworth can pull the program. If and when I get it I will post it here, ok.....
    you doh even need to post it can pm np.thanks.

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    Banned Trinizagada is offline
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    I already contacted Kenny... as soon as it becomes available I will get it to you...

  5. #5
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    I already contacted Kenny... as soon as it becomes available I will get it to you...
    Respect King.

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    Registered User Shaqdiesel's Avatar Shaqdiesel is offline
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    Shakki Starfire - Party Plenty/We Losing It (Official Video)

    2012 Official Music Video Release of St.Kitts Soca Queen Shakki Starfire performing "Party plenty/We Losing It"


  7. #7
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Since you decide to use me in your nonsense fight...make sure wen you doing it you doh making people use you...check with your cheerleader... you wasn't on here wen Imix was bashing henderson calling him a liar... Val even went as far as getting henderson to personally email her on it and posted it on imix... doh make de woman gas you up .... it have a bad look for you not her because she learning trini juss like most of us ... and you trying to come of as some kinda open to all opinions blogger...

    Real talk now as someone who use to have respect for what you had to say...

    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    I am waiting for an audio clip from WACK radio regarding King Wellington's claim that he created Soca... however, Ellsworth James who co hosts that show and holds the recorded clips is away from the station... Kenny Phillips (owner of the station is busy producing music for KMP music studios at this time). I will add it here for the person who requested it - Ushawishi!

    The problem I have with some people in here who are attempting to debunk Shorty's claim... is that they are also trying to discredit Trinidad as a whole. Imix is too Afrocentric and afraid to embrase the European and East Indian elements of our culture. A certain radio station calls Trinis the "Curry Crew"... isn't that racist! Who said 'Small Island Massive?"

    Shorty named the genre... yes it has changed over the years and each island added its unique flavor to the music but one problem remains.... music that is not even Soca today also falls under the umbrella of Soca! That creates more kankalang!

    Madmen productions have created "Island Pop" .... already discredited as nothing new but the haters would not address "Madmen Productions". Nothing Trinidad does is worth anything in here. However, wheh they add someting to the music eg... Ragga Soca ... what happens? We praise that person as innovative... when someone adds something and calls it 'Power Soca' that person gets all the praise. Trinis are disliked but a Tobagonian is acceptable as in a Shadow or a Shurwayne Winchester - enough now... we are called 'traumatized' on this site by the class clown and that is OK!

    When we speak out we are called hyprocrites! Those were some frigging random thoughts.... Choops!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ushawishi View Post
    Big man i see you respectfully avoiding responding to me directly ... i was trying to respect that and just listen to what you have to say... since you decide to mention me in dis friggin random thoughts.. I think my intention should be made to you...

    I for one can not deny shorty claim to de music he made.. impossible i would be lying... I will however say that Soca doesnt fit de same umbrella as sokah I gave my opinions on that already... I look at de man, his words and his music as a whole...


    I asked you for de transcript because he explain in detail de music he was making as in chord progession keys etc...i love caribbean music... do i think it is Soca? No ... Do I think it has influence in what we call Soca ? yes.

    If you all were interested in anything other than Trinidad maybe we would be talking about something other than Trinidad...
    I will also say de very same thing to Grant wellington and who else want sole claim to de genre...

    Now lemme put cadence-lypso what I wanted to talk about in dis topic once again... many documents out there claim is Henderson who create it ... which i does call out anytime I get de chance in a discussion about de music and its creator... is a similar situation going on in dominica where dey giving one man credit for de music... I will most publicly talk against that ... if de situation comes up.

    Do I ever hide or deny my black agenda/ideology ... i is rastafari..... most active people on here know that....putting black people against each other nothing new... black people normally de one most gullible and leading de charge... up to a point yet you find other people fighting for us more dan we do for ourselves...

    Do i think de people of trinidad and tobago need to realize dat Shorty did not support de music they say is his ? yes. If you have an ovastanding of de man as i do you will understand why he humbly try to keep his people united under something he wanted...He asself is living proof all man can live with highest regards to each other and not take once ounce of him proudly being black.... study de man...


    I just doh like my name called in de same place with hypocrisy... yes i know you didnt call me a hypocrite... This man not afraid to call a spade a spade...just letting you know... random thoughts..

    I for one on no fight down thing ... because de music doesnt change de attitude of the people like it was/is supposed to according to Ras shorty I...Since in de musically definition i.e when everybody accepted de music as one genre, about de same time with de typo Shorty walk away...it is reflected take de blinders off...

    @ man of mystery I done already support dat plenty songs sounds like Socah but with man like Triniking around I picking up indian in more and more songs I hadn't previously recognize... Seawall done explain de eddy grant song and what part sounds like soca ... he didn't say de whole song was soca...

    Oh yea gada if you using my request for a fight down thing doh say is for me you doing it because that would be hypocrisy...I doh want you do it at my requests( i specifically ask you to PM it), that is all you now... if you didn't know it now you do.Respect King.

  8. #8
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    R U Really serious? Do I own a radio station? I asked for the tape of the program but Ellsworth James is away and is the person responsible for that program... What the hell do you want me to do? I am in Manhattan and Trinidad is a phone call away... I asked and have to wait! Ignore you... believe what you want...

    VP listened to that show when it happened... ask him and maybe he can tell you what took place.

    I am tired of all the 'tawk'... good, bad, indifferent, for and against... it has come full circle and will continue to do so with various thread names. I believe what I believe and it is of no importance to anyone here .... right! Nobody cares what anyone from Trinidad has to say because we are all robots and can't think for ourselves... People like Seawell and VP and yourself can see things in the 'right light' and put everything in the right context/perspective unlike these biased Trinidadians like myself. Good ... so be it.

    I know what I know.... people like Kenny Phillips, Ellsworth James and Sprangalang, some of whom I have spoken to on the radio and in person, (Kenny Phillips is a personal friend) have told me stories about the soca story that many of you would like to hear but will never ever accept. Some of them believe that Soca was started by Wellington some by Shadow and some will give Shorty some credit... I have my views. I have never heard any of them say it started outside Trinidad! By the way Ellsworth is from St. Vincent.... Kenny (according to VP) has Vincy roots but they all root for Trinidad... I wonder why?

    I believe that Lord Shorty created the name for the music genre.... I believe that his music which he named Sokah and was misquoted as Soca by Ivor Fereira has changed and continues to change to this day... but I believe that he laid the foundation for the genre... you believe what you want to...

    Having made that statement everything else is mute as far as I am concerned. If you want to consider that arrogance or even ignorance then so be it... Believe whatever you, Seawell or VP want to... life goes on even though Shorty is gone and cannot now defend his work!

    VP, Seawell ... Good luck with trying to get the world to believe otherwise! Seawell you said Shorty was an arrogant Liar but he was man enough to demonstrate how he created his music ... did Eddie Grant do that? Who else demonstrated how they created Soca? Not a damn dog barked.... so who the hell do you guys think you are?
    Quote Originally Posted by Ushawishi View Post
    Big man ... I get accused of de way i write not my fault i honestly bad at writing...I a reader...

    I am nobody important to you... I only speak for myself tho... doh tie me in with Seawall and VP our opinions tho similar are very much different...

    nothing you said in this long post relate to 1 thing i said to you... help me connect de dots if you do not mind please? i have read again for good measure...

    You never responded to any thing i said directly in this thread i was just reading de entire thread when you said you were going to post something because i requested it...so i responded to explain why i asked for it...

    I did not care to hear what VP said about it else i would have asked him...

    It would be a shame to not get my hands on it because you get offended personally... but I can respect dat ... if i offended you i am sorry ... If you would tell me where so i can apologize because it wasn't my intention...you tell me wait when i asked i said thanks and said you can PM it np... I have plenty patience.

    You have me really wondering atm ... if i didnt respect what you had to say i would never be endorsing your blog or following up on your references when I can if the opportunity presents its self.

    Maybe I misunderstood your not replying to me but mentioning my name ...if that is it I am sorry for the misunderstanding.
    Respect king ...
    How can i not think of you as a hypocrite now when you so blatantly show your passion is having de same ole my dik bigger dan yours talk...I respected what you say enough to be visiting your blog now and den... fool me once... now thats twice... won't be a thrid...

    You doh give a fuk about Shorty as a man else you would have wanted to know everything about him... Shorty was a household name in Dominica he was one of us ... as with every other caribbean person at de time... people wasn't fighting each other for nofing it was just about making positive music.... my grandparents and parents... dominican musicians... everybody has de highest regard for Shorty... every Dominican I know of give him his respect with no negatives... dey even have a local nickname for him...since 1960s Shorty all in Dominica making music with big calypso man...


    Listen big man doh even bother doh even bother getting transcript for me anymore ... i will talk to de man if i get a chance before he die... I not in all you same ole useless talk... doh use me in your foreplay...

    All you know nothing about Shorty... who he was comes nowhere close to de fact his name coincides with a typo in de eyes of many proud trini....Before yesterday i thought Wellington was a trini... now I even fraid to ask where he from on imix.


    All you googlers quick was quick to jump down on Henderson... a spade is a spade and I think you a hypocrite... doh use me in your nonsense... i not in dem vibes dere...

    Thanks.

  9. #9
    Registered User Seawall's Avatar Seawall is offline
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    I posted the Wellington interview some time ago. it was done by Dmitri Subotsky and John Child (Who i trade music with from time to time). I don't think that the show is still on their site.
    totallyradio | world guest shows

    here's a related piece from The Guardian newspaper.

    Thursday 22nd February, 2007

    The Trinidad Guardian -Online Edition Ver 2.0

    A fresh look at Calypso, Soca history

    ‘You cannot help but note the brilliant new directions in which he continues to steer Calypso. In Movin’ Up, King Wellington forges even further ahead with his highly successful calypso experiments…to create a distinctively different Calypso sound that is entirely his own.’

    Calypso researcher Dmitri Subotsky takes a fresh look at the development of Calypso into Soca.

    The creation of soca is almost always credited to Garfield Blackman, Lord Shorty (later Ras Shorty I), with tracks such as Indrani, Endless Vibrations and Soul Calypso Music being identified as landmark tracks in the development of the music. Others dispute this and names mentioned include Lord Nelson (Garrot Bounce), Shadow (Bass Man), Maestro (Savage) and even Eddy Grant (Black Skinned Blue Eyed Boys). I have personally never been comfortable with any of these assertions.

    My first real exposure to soca music was on the airwaves of London’s radio stations in 1987. My views on what soca music was (and indeed should be!) were essentially formed from what I heard that year.

    I had read about the beginnings of soca, and in particular the significance of Indrani, but it was many years before I actually heard the track, and when I did I was most surprised. By that time I was reasonably familiar with calypso from the pre-soca era and was expecting to detect the key elements of what I knew as soca music in this famous track. In all honesty I heard nothing that I recognised as soca. Certainly its use of Indian instruments singled it out as an interesting experiment, but I really did not feel that it was the missing link between calypso and soca that I had been led to believe.

    I rather felt the same when I heard Endless Vibrations and Soul Calypso Music; they were certainly very different musically from most other calypsoes being recorded at that time and their lyrical content left one in no doubt that Shorty was trying to experiment with music, but to me they just did not have a soca sound.

    I did not give the matter much further thought until in 2005 my colleague John Child invited me to join him in a discussion of the origins of soca for a BBC radio documentary. My views on the subject had not really changed and, although I did not at that stage have an alternative view, I was not prepared to tow the Shorty line.

    I tried to think of what records I had heard from the early to mid-’70s that stood out as being different, and my mind was drawn to two particular albums by the same calypsonian. Examining his prior work led me to believe that this man played an important part, if not the most important part in the development of calypso into soca. That man was King Wellington.

    King Wellington (Hawthorne Quashie) made his recording debut in 1966 under the name The Cisco with a track celebrating the PNM’s victory in that year’s general election.

    He emigrated to the US in 1967, initially living in Manhattan but subsequently moving to Boston. Whilst there he studied music, including a period at Berklee College of Music.

    Wellington’s first recording in the US was released in 1969/70 on his own Plek label. It was his commentary on the moon landings, entitled Moonwalking. The track was notable for its prominent bassline - an earlier indicator of things to come. Listening to it again, this track seems years ahead of its time.

    In 1970/71 he recorded approximately ten tracks for the Straker’s label including Mango Vert, Mod Squad USA and Treat Your Woman Nice. However the most significant of these recordings was New Calypso Music. According to King Wellington, speaking to John Child and me in 2006, That was the first time a calypso was made with the bass soloing. Calypsoes in those days were four verses. I chose to make three verses because I wanted to leave space for the musicians to improvise. That was always my intent.

    Soul singers like Arthur Conley, Jerry Butler and Otis Redding were the popular singers in Trinidad. Calypso was sort of pushed to the side. I thought if we join calypso with soul music we may generate some sales.

    In 1973, King Wellington had possibly the biggest hit of his career with Steel & Brass, just missing out on that year’s Road March. Later that year he recorded his debut album, Who is King Wellington, which was initially released on Plek (dated 1973) and then received a wider issue on Charlie’s Records for the 1974 Carnival.

    Art DeCoteau, Ed Watson and Ron Berridge arranged the vast majority of recorded calypso in the early 1970s, but King Wellington used a different arranger, pianist Orville Wright, a Trinidadian whom King Wellington had met at Berklee (and who was later Chair of the Ensemble Department there for many years). Further, the big band had been replaced by a smaller, tighter, group of musicians that included Michael Toby Tobas on drums (who later performed on Shorty’s Sweet Music) and King Wellington himself on bass.


    The whole album sounded very different to other calypso of the time, particularly in its use of prominent bass lines and percussion. Also notable was the extended instrumental jam at the end of More Woman.

    The album included several re-recordings of tracks originally recorded just a couple of years earlier, and when directly compared, the change in the sound is marked.

    King Wellington called his music of the time Rusofunk, and he believes that if that name had stuck to the modern form of calypso, then he would be recognised as its creator.


    His second LP, Movin’ Up, was released for the 1975 Carnival, the same time as Lord Shorty’s Endless Vibrations album.

    In the title track, Wellington proclaimed, “pretty soon the world will see and know how much soul we have in we calypso.” The standout track on the album is, for me, the extraordinary Mighty Stone and Dem Calypso Jam, a bizarre funky effort that I am unable to compare to any other calypso.

    Dave Elcock wrote of the album at the time: “You cannot help but note the brilliant new directions in which he continues to steer Calypso. In Movin’ Up, King Wellington forges even further ahead with his highly successful calypso experiments…to create a distinctively different Calypso sound that is entirely his own.”

    King Wellington has in recent years been managing the Kaiso House tent.

    His 2006 song, The Problem Is, was amongst the more highly regarded calypsoes of the year. When I contacted him last year, expressing my desire to speak to him about his contribution to the development of soca, he initially seemed shocked and reluctant to talk. For some reason, credit has been assigned elsewhere and his works have almost been written out of history.

    In any genre of music, it is virtually impossible to put a change in the sound down to one person, but listening to the music of King Wellington today and putting it in its historical context can leave one in no doubt as to the significance of his contribution.

    The influences of American soul and funk, giving space to the musicians, the prominence of the electric bass, the extended instrumental play-outs and the move away from the big band sound are all key elements of early soca, and they are evident in the recordings of King Wellington more prominently and earlier than that of any other artist.

    This article is not in any way intended to denigrate the works of Lord Shorty and others, but to bring due credit to an unsung hero, who in his own words did not want to toot his own horn.
    ©2005-2006 Trinidad Publishing Company Limited
    "Every onlooker is either a coward or a traitor." — Frantz Fanon

  10. #10
    Registered User Ushawishi is offline
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    Seawall as usual you pull out an excellent read... you never cease to amaze with your resources ... If you have sources on what i need hook me up

    I interested in dat particular interview not because of his claim in the involvement of soca... i give him dat long time... but because he went into intimate details about his music Rusofunk... chord progressions ,keys , combinations... dem kinda fing dere... dem pioneers have juss pure genuis...they also play his first track where he distinguish it from calypso...

    ... but gada on some other... stuff... sigh.

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