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Thread: Ragga Soca and Groovy Soca, Define the differences

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    Banned Trinizagada is offline
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    Ragga Soca and Groovy Soca, Define the differences

    I have noticed a contentious thread where the discussion follows two paths regarding what is and is not Ragga Soca. However, it is clear to me that, once again, we have a labeling issue. It appears that in St. Vincent and the Grenadines the term Ragga Soca is used to define what the rest of the region calls Groovy Soca. The problem is that for the rest of the region the understanding for the term 'Ragga Soca' is a combination of Dancehall style intermixed with the Soca riddim.

    VP is not giving ground and contends that Ragga Soca was started in St. Vincent while many are attempting to differentiate the styles as basically two patterns of the music namely Ragga (Jamaican vibes) and Groovy or slower more dancing style Soca.

    Apparently you can't convince someone from St. Vincent and the Grenadines that what you understand as Ragga is different. We can always agree to disagree and let it rest there. However, we can also state our opinions here for others to consume. It is apparent (as stated in the other thread) that many onlookers come here for information. We can provide information for their understanding or confuse them further.

    What is your opinion?

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    I have noticed a contentious thread where the discussion follows two paths regarding what is and is not Ragga Soca. However, it is clear to me that, once again, we have a labeling issue. It appears that in St. Vincent and the Grenadines the term Ragga Soca is used to define what the rest of the region calls Groovy Soca. The problem is that for the rest of the region the understanding for the term 'Ragga Soca' is a combination of Dancehall style intermixed with the Soca riddim.

    VP is not giving ground and contends that Ragga Soca was started in St. Vincent while many are attempting to differentiate the styles as basically two patterns of the music namely Ragga (Jamaican vibes) and Groovy or slower more dancing style Soca.

    Apparently you can't convince someone from St. Vincent and the Grenadines that what you understand as Ragga is different. We can always agree to disagree and let it rest there. However, we can also state our opinions here for others to consume. It is apparent (as stated in the other thread) that many onlookers come here for information. We can provide information for their understanding or confuse them further.

    What is your opinion?
    Did the name GROOVY SOCA EXISTED before 2005?

    If not, why should I GIVE GROUND to a name CREATED in 2005 for a SOCA MONARCH competition?

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    Banned Trinizagada is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    Did the name GROOVY SOCA EXISTED before 2005?

    If not, why should I GIVE GROUND to a name CREATED in 2005 for a SOCA MONARCH competition?
    Here is a part of an article that I just took a look at... this should help spice up the conversation ->

    "ABSTRACT:  In the late 1990s, a new musical genre emerged in Trinidad called ragga soca. Ragga soca is described as the product of blending Trinidad's indigenous soca music with Jamaican dancehall. One peculiarity of ragga soca is the borrowing of Jamaican Creole English phonological features into the performance genre. Initially, there was much opposition to this genre as it challenged notions of Trinidadian identity and self. This paper considers the linguistic innovativeness of ragga soca artists, in particular, their use of Jamaican Creole English phonological borrowings, demonstrating that they have not only created a new performance genre, but have used Jamaican Creole English to mediate their Trinidadian identity."
    Online Library Wiley.com

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    Here is a part of an article that I just took a look at... this should help spice up the conversation ->

    "ABSTRACT:  In the late 1990s, a new musical genre emerged in Trinidad called ragga soca. Ragga soca is described as the product of blending Trinidad's indigenous soca music with Jamaican dancehall. One peculiarity of ragga soca is the borrowing of Jamaican Creole English phonological features into the performance genre. Initially, there was much opposition to this genre as it challenged notions of Trinidadian identity and self. This paper considers the linguistic innovativeness of ragga soca artists, in particular, their use of Jamaican Creole English phonological borrowings, demonstrating that they have not only created a new performance genre, but have used Jamaican Creole English to mediate their Trinidadian identity."
    Online Library Wiley.com
    I remember when the Ragga trend was big in TNT, with artists like Bunji, Denise Belfon, Precious, 3suns and tons of other artistes.... I would have to say that Byron Lee did some Ragga too....dont understand why VP is saying that Ragga started in SVG.

    Natalie Burke did Ragga, Fab 5 and we could go on and on, Machel, the Jamaican artiste, BUD.
    Last edited by SWAGGERIFIC; 03-13-2012 at 12:30 AM.

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    I have noticed a contentious thread where the discussion follows two paths regarding what is and is not Ragga Soca. However, it is clear to me that, once again, we have a labeling issue. It appears that in St. Vincent and the Grenadines the term Ragga Soca is used to define what the rest of the region calls Groovy Soca.
    What was the REST of the REGION calling this so-called GROOVY SOCA before 2005?

    When you can answer that question, then we can have a SERIOUS and SUBSTANTIVE discussion on this issue.

    The problem is that for the rest of the region the understanding for the term 'Ragga Soca' is a combination of Dancehall style intermixed with the Soca riddim.
    You're WRONG.

    Again, the PROBLEM here is TRINIS wanting to DEFINE what other islands should call their MUSIC.

    For example, when, for example, St. Kitts n Nevis defined that style of music, TRINIS will NATURALLY say that's "WE TING"...that is our CREATION.

    And so, people from that nation will LOOK like FOOLS unable to DEFINE their own SOUND, because of FALLING in LINE with WHAT TRINIS say it should be.

    It is just another EXAMPLE of TRINIDAD wanting to DEFINE EVERYTHING that has to do with the word SOCA.

    Well, we in VINCYLAND is not PLAYING that GAME.

    Our MUSIC is RAGGA SOCA, and I can MAKE the CASE for it anytime, anywhere or anyplace.

    VP is not giving ground and contends that Ragga Soca was started in St. Vincent while many are attempting to differentiate the styles as basically two patterns of the music namely Ragga (Jamaican vibes) and Groovy or slower more dancing style Soca.
    Why should I GIVE GROUND to something that has its FOUNDATION in St. Vincent and the Grenadines?

    Apparently you can't convince someone from St. Vincent and the Grenadines that what you understand as Ragga is different. We can always agree to disagree and let it rest there. However, we can also state our opinions here for others to consume. It is apparent (as stated in the other thread) that many onlookers come here for information. We can provide information for their understanding or confuse them further.

    What is your opinion?
    There is NO CONVINCING VINCIES about SOMETHING that has been part of its FOUNDATION SOUND for DECADES to be something else than what they have deemed it to be.

    YUHHHHHHH SEEEEEEEEEE MEEEEEEEEEEEEEEe

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinizagada View Post
    Here is a part of an article that I just took a look at... this should help spice up the conversation ->

    "ABSTRACT:  In the late 1990s, a new musical genre emerged in Trinidad called ragga soca. Ragga soca is described as the product of blending Trinidad's indigenous soca music with Jamaican dancehall. One peculiarity of ragga soca is the borrowing of Jamaican Creole English phonological features into the performance genre. Initially, there was much opposition to this genre as it challenged notions of Trinidadian identity and self. This paper considers the linguistic innovativeness of ragga soca artists, in particular, their use of Jamaican Creole English phonological borrowings, demonstrating that they have not only created a new performance genre, but have used Jamaican Creole English to mediate their Trinidadian identity."
    Online Library Wiley.com
    SMH

    Here we go again, RUNNING for these ABSTRACT ARTICLES that a BUM off the STREET can put together and POST on the INTERNET.

    You think I was BORN YESTERDAY or SOMETHING?

    I know what is the ULTERIOR MOTIVE of all this.

    Again, This STYLE of VINCY MUSIC is RAGGA SOCA.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Lol @ vp

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    I remember when the Ragga trend was big in TNT, with artists like Bunji, Denise Belfon, Precious, 3suns and tons of other artistes.... I would have to say that Byron Lee did some Ragga too....dont understand why VP is saying that Ragga started in SVG.

    Natalie Burke did Ragga, Fab 5 and we could go on and on, Machel, the Jamaican artiste, BUD.
    Bunji, Denise Belfon, Precious, 3suns?

    R U People SERIOUS?

    I said this STYLE STARTED in VINCY.

    We have been calling it that for the LONGEST and no attempt to CATEGORIZE it under some other name created for a SOCA COMPETITION in 2005 is going to CHANGE that FACT.

    Again, our MUSIC is RAGGA SOCA.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    VP, ok if you are saying that Vincies call Groovy Soca, Ragga but to say that Ragga Soca as we Trinis know it is indigenous to SVG is flawed, there were tons of artists from all over who were fusing Reggae/Dancehall/Soca.

    Byron Lee/Fab 5 were pioneers in this, its the same as Dancehall Soca today like what Beenie, Buffy, Swappi, Busy Signal, Lil Rick and so much of them do today.
    Last edited by SWAGGERIFIC; 03-13-2012 at 12:42 AM.
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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    **STILL WAITING for SOMEONE to ANSWER the ONE QUESTION I have been ASKING every time this ISSUE COMES UP**

    Again, what were people calling this style of soca before 2005?

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    Bunji, Denise Belfon, Precious, 3suns?

    R U People SERIOUS?

    I said this STYLE STARTED in VINCY.

    We have been calling it that for the LONGEST and no attempt to CATEGORIZE it under some other name created for a SOCA COMPETITION in 2005 is going to CHANGE that FACT.

    Again, our MUSIC is RAGGA SOCA.
    u could call it what u want, this music by Bomani is Groovy Soca, plain and simple...Ragga Soca would more be like Skinny Fabolous or something.

    so if alyuh call Groovy Soca, ragga Soca.

    then what alyuh call what we call Ragga Soca/Soca Dancehall?

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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    VP, ok if you are saying that Vincies call Groovy Soca, Ragga but to say that Ragga Soca as we Trinis know it is indigenous to SVG is flawed, there were tons of artists from all over who were fusing Reggae/Dancehall/Soca.

    Barrington Levy/Fab 5 were pioneers in this, its the same as Dancehall Soca today like what Beenie, Buffy, Swappi, Busy Signal, Lil Rick and so much of them do today.
    Instead of TALKING, how about putting forth so EVIDENCE to SUBSTANTIATE your ARGUMENT?

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by VINCYPOWA View Post
    **STILL WAITING for SOMEONE to ANSWER the ONE QUESTION I have been ASKING every time this ISSUE COMES UP**

    Again, what were people calling this style of soca before 2005?
    well Soca was just that, with the variations, sub divisions were given over time

    Soca started off Groovy, power came about in the early 90's...
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    Registered Member VINCYPOWA's Avatar VINCYPOWA is offline
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    Quote Originally Posted by SWAGGERIFIC View Post
    u could call it what u want, this music by Bomani is Groovy Soca, plain and simple...Ragga Soca would more be like Skinny Fabolous or something.

    so if alyuh call Groovy Soca, ragga Soca.

    then what alyuh call what we call Ragga Soca/Soca Dancehall?
    We call it RAGGA SOCA...there are DIFFERENT VARIATIONS of it in VINCYLAND.

    Again, what was TRINIDAD calling so-called GROOVY before 2005?.

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    Norman SWAGGERIFIC is offline
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    ah mean Byron Lee, me eh know why the hell ah saying Barrinton LOL

    There is at least 6 subdivisions of Soca

    POWER SOCA

    GROOVY SOCA

    RAGGA SOCA/ SOCA DANCEHALL

    CHUTNEY SOCA

    POP SOCA/ISLAND POP/TECHNO SOCA

    BOYOUN SOCA

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