In the blogs

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            [post_date] => 2014-08-20 10:00:47
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            [post_content] => The National Hurricane Center located in Barbados has titled the latest tropical wave approaching the Caribbean as Invest 96L. According to the latest release by the NHC, Invest 96L is currently located near 10 degrees North and 50.5 degrees West or 800 miles east of the Lesser Antilles and is on a trajectory path west-north-Westwards at 10-15mph.

The rising sea surface temperatures within the area are suitable for the development of Invest 96L as it moves through the Lesser Antilles between Thursday night and Friday morning.

invest-96L-caribean-weatherb

Dr. Jeff Masters from Weather Under The Blog, has indicated that  “two of our three reliable models for predicting tropical cyclone genesis, the UKMET and GFS models, predicted that 96L would develop into a tropical storm after passing through the Lesser Antilles”.

“If 96L does develop, it would likely be similar to Tropical Storm Bertha of early August while it is in the Caribbean–a weak and disorganized system that struggles against dry air” according to Dr. Masters.
            [post_title] => Strengthening Tropical Wave Approaches The Caribbean
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Strengthening Tropical Wave Approaches The Caribbean

August 20, 2014
1

The National Hurricane Center located in Barbados has titled the latest tropical wave approaching the Caribbean as Invest 96L. According to the latest release by the NHC, Invest 96...Continue reading

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            [post_date] => 2014-08-17 19:30:10
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            [post_content] => Dance in the Caribbean can easily be labelled and pinpointed as being only associated with whining and grinding, parties, fetes and the dance hall. We all know that dance is a big part of our cultures as we are very much celebratory people, who like to have a good time and unwind. Dancing is great source of enjoyment for us and we can’t get enough of it. Due to the party culture in the Caribbean, ‘titled’ dance moves have often found their claim to fame worldwide through us. Jamaica and the dancehall scene are primarily known for their perpetual release of new dance styles and the songs that go along with them. Though many times quite outrageous yet comical, not all will have an acquired taste for what is being released by dancehall dancer.

The creativity that flows from our communities is something to be proud of as we are very expressive people. My goal here is to show a different side of dance culture in our islands. The type of dance that has a more formal element yet still resonates with our identity.

With popular shows like So You Think You Can Dance and Dancing with the Stars from North American television it is important to note that we too have just as much if not more talent housed in our own communities. Some have stayed and some have branched out around the world, but it is important to know that though we may not always see our cultures represented in the mainstream, we are there.

The following are some dance companies within the islands that you may or may not have heard of and a few interesting facts from these home grown facilities.

The National Theatre Dance Company of Jamaica

Formed in 1962 by Rex Nettleford and Eddie Thomas, this dance company has been dedicated to maintaining a display of Jamaica’s ancestral roots of dance and culture while incorporating contemporary styles.

Metamorphisis Dance Company of Trinidad and Tobago

Popularily known as The Caribbean School Of Dancing this company too founded quite early in 1957 by a woman named Marcia Moze. This dance company prides itself in raising up many who dance in the professional world and have moved onto to companies such as the Alvin Ailey Dance Company, and the Geneva Ballet in Switzerland to name a few.

National Dance Company of the Bahamas


Founded in 1991 this dance company has brought a flavour and style, grace and culture to the island of the Bahamas. One of its great initiatives is the Revitalizing Youth For Tomorrow program, where disenfranchised youth of Nassau are given the opportunity to learn dance through free instructional classes.

Praise Academy of Dance Barbados

Affiliated with the Praise Academy of Dance that was started in Jamaica by Patricia Noble in 1993, this chapter in Barbados has excelled and grown since its launch in 2004. Now recognized as a Premier Dance Company due to its high standards, Praise Academy of Barbados has over 250 students ranging from age 3 to 50 years old. Their vision as a Christian dance company is to ‘change mindsets through movement’.

The music and dance forms found in our Caribbean are a great part of our identity. There are a lot more dance companies and many other islands to mention, but through this piece I've but just scratched the surface.

**Photo credit: Tony Wong
            [post_title] => The Caribbean Dances
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The Caribbean Dances

August 17, 2014
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Dance in the Caribbean can easily be labelled and pinpointed as being only associated with whining and grinding, parties, fetes and the dance hall. We all know that dance is a big ...Continue reading

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            [post_date] => 2014-08-17 16:05:27
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            [post_content] => Do you remember Sundays in Jamaica? Whether or not you can relate, I am here to share the experience with you. Firstly, I don’t know who named the first day of the week Sunday, but they gave it the perfect name, as the heat from the sun on this day is unmatched. I believe among other things that Sunday is the perfect day to do laundry and hang your clothes on the lines outside to dry, as they will be dried in no time at all.

Now, for the real experience.

You are awaken either by the sound of gospel music belting out in your home, or by your mom, aunt or grandma singing hymns that stems from their Christian beliefs. As a kid Sunday was the day that you wanted to sleep in, but your mother or grandmother would force you to go to church. Nonetheless, your Sunday morning breakfast would be the best breakfast you will have all week guaranteed. Whether it’s that large bowl of cornmeal porridge, sweetened with condensed milk, with a little cinnamon, nutmeg, vanilla, some sugar and a little salt! There’s nothing like it, or the classic egg and bread, or fried dumplings and steamed cabbage with salt fish (cod fish); or some Ackee and fried salt fish, with fried breadfruit and boiled green bananas, dumplings and a cup of cocoa tea! These are some of the best breakfasts guaranteed and a few classic and delicious Jamaican Sunday breakfast options. As for music, don't you dare play anything on your radio but gospel, or ... well, just try it and come back to me and share your experience.

Sundays here are also the most tranquil days on this island. And after church in the morning, the family comes together for the feast of the ages - I don't think I could describe Sunday dinner any better.  This is also the best dinner you will have all week. It seems like for Jamaicans, Sunday is the day to pull out all the stops and just splurge. Sunday dinner always has the best dishes. One common practice for Sunday dinner preparation is that two meats are prepared. This is usually chicken, which is a must, and fried fish or stewed oxtail. Sometimes it can be beef, mutton or some other popular meat. Then there’s the rice and peas, whether it’s red peas (kidney beans) or gungo peas, and some shredded vegetables and a large glass of carrot or sour soup juice. Sometimes there’s some ice cold kool aid. What a 'feastful' day! I'm getting hungry just writing this. In Jamaica, Sundays are a day of love, good food and family fellowship.

Sunday is also the best day to go to the beach here. If you haven’t yet, you need to speed a Sunday in Jamaica at a native’s home. You’ll love it!

Now it's time for my Sunday dinner! Yum!

 

 
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It's Dinner Time, And It's Sunday In Jamaica!

August 17, 2014
1

Do you remember Sundays in Jamaica? Whether or not you can relate, I am here to share the experience with you. Firstly, I dont know who named the first day of the week Sunday, but ...Continue reading